Tuesday, September 11, 2012

Amanda Knox Appeal Statement

old post 2010


What follows is Amanda Knox's statement before the court in the recent hearing regarding a review of the DNA.

It must be noted that this was released in Italian and translated into English.

Statement Analysis, in the proper term, "Scientific Content Analysis" (SCAN) is best conducted in the original language. The Labratory for Scientific Interrogation (LSI) conducts instruction in various countries in the native language of the country.

In Knox' case, her first language is English and not Italian. Should the original version in English be released, we will do a more detailed analysis. To avoid error, we will employ only general principle.

Amanda's speech in court:

...It would happen sometimes that someone would propose a subject to discuss among us, everyone giving their opinion. I liked to followed these discussions but I was uncomfortable about whether I should participate directly, because I'm not talented for discussions. Often I don't succeed in expressing my convictions, at least verbally right at the moment. In fact, of all my friends, I'm the weakest for this. That's why, jokingly, my friend would usually jump on this, that my character was so peace-loving, and would challenge me with a little sentence: “Stand up for yourself Poindexter”, which means “Defend yourself, grind” [secchiona=someone who studies too hard, too serious]. It was a joke. And inevitably, either I would answer, but the answer coming out of my mouth would get all twisted incomprehensible...incomprehensibly around itself, or, I just didn't succeed in answering at all, because my mind would get blocked and my tongue would get all stuck. I couldn't do the thing that my friend often asked me to do, which was to defend myself. We have to imagine [Figuriamoci se io...not easy to render in English: maybe “You can imagine”] that I'm the weakest person in this room for expressing myself. That's why I ask for patience, because all this that I've prepared are the things that I didn't succeed in saying to you yet. Or better, I find myself in front of you for the second time, but these are the things that I would like to have said already. I ask you for patience because there have been opportunities to speak, but I was of few words. I believe that often words didn't come to me, because I never expected to find myself here,

Note that in Amanda Knox' address to the court, she spoke at length about how she feels she does not communicate well. Almost 25 per cent of her words are about her own speech.

Note that her initial accounts of what happened tested deceptive in statement analysis. (see prior analysis) The language she used suggested sexual activity and deception. She claimed to have been confused about details and here she dedicates a lengthy introduction to claim that although educated, she lacks skill in verbal communication and that she isn't someone to defend herself. Note that when an innocent person is falsey accused, they find ways to communicate this plainly.  In her magazine interview, as well as her descriptions of prison life, she does not show any handicap or disability in communication. Nor do we find any here, in her recent statement.

Next, we find her first denial:

"for I crime I didn't do" (which may have been 'commit' lost in translation) Note that this denial has the first person singular, but is not as strong as identifying the action, rather than the classification of actions (crime). We look for a specific denial such as "I didn't stab Meredith" or "I didn't attack Meredith" as being stronger.


condemned for a crime I didn't do. In these three years, I've learned your language, and I've seen how the procedure goes, but I've never gotten used to this broken life. I still don't know how to face all this if not just by being myself, who I've always been, in spite of the suffocating awkwardness. I was wrong to think that there are right or wrong places and moments to say important things. Important things have to be said, and that's all.

The only thing I am really sorry about now is that there are people to whom I should turn, who are not here, but I hope my words will reach them, because I am either locked in prison, or I'm here. And...I'm here.

Here she says that there is only one thing she is "really sorry" about: people she cannot see due to being in prison or court. "really" sorry would indicate other sorrows. Next, she then says she is sorry to the family of Meredith:

To the family and dear ones of Meredith, I want to say that I'm so sorry that Meredith is not here any more. I can't know how you feel, but I too have little sisters, and the idea of their suffering and infinite loss terrifies me.

Note that "I'm so sorry" is found with the same sentence as "Meredith is not here any more", which is minimizing. It is not just that Meredith isn't present, she is murdered and will never be anywhere but dead. This minimization is noted among the deceptive and guilty; coupled with "I'm sorry" shows responsiblity.


It's incomprehensible, it's unacceptable, what you're going through, and what Meredith underwent. [Long pause]

note "what Meredith underwent" is to avoid much stronger language of being knifed, attacked, and brutally murdered. Minimization is noted.

I'm sorry all this happened to you and that you'll never have her near you, where she should be. It's not just and never will be. If you're not alone when you're thinking of her, because I'm thinking of you, I also remember Meredith, [5:00] and my heart bleeds for all of you.

It is likely that Meredith's family did not wish to hear that Amanda Knox was thinking of them.


Meredith was kind, intelligent, nice and always available.

I hesitate to quote the word "available" as it sounds strange to the English language, and may not be what Knox said. "Available" in a sexual homicide, suggests willingness. It is noted here, but, again, with caution, as it may not have been the English word intended by Amanda.


She was the one who invited me to see Perugia, with her, as a friend. I'm grateful and honored to have been able to be in her company and to have been able to know her.

By stating that "she was the one who invited me" she may suggest that what happened was Meredith's fault and is a subtle casting of blame. Again I caution the reader due to translation. Amanda Knox' other statments, in English, should be considered more reliable. Yet, is there blame being cast here?

If Meredith was "available" when wanted, would she have been killed? Note the caution above of putting too much into this word, "available" since it may not have been the English word used. If it was, then under the circumstances, it is highly sensitive.

Patrick? I don't see you. But, I'm sorry. I'm sorry, because I didn't want to wrong you. I was very naïve and really not courageous, because I should have been able to endure the pressure that pushed me to hurt you. I didn't want to contribute to all that you suffered. You know what it means to have unjust accusations imposed on your skin. You didn't deserve what you went through. I hope you'll succeed in finding your peace.


Amanda Knox implicated Patrick in the murder of Meredith, falsely, and here says that she is "sorry" but then blames others in the "pressure that pushed me to hurt you"; alleviating her of personal responsibility.

Note that although she claims to be unable to defend herself clearly due to language and communication limitations, she was clear when she implicated Patrick as Meredith's killer.

Meredith's death was a terrible shock for me. She was my new friend, a reference point for me here in Perugia. But she was killed. Because I felt an affinity towards her, suddenly, in her death, I recognized my own vulnerability. I clung above all to Raffaele, who was a source of reassurance, consolation, availability and love for me.

I also trusted the authorities carrying out the investigation, because I wanted to help render justice for Meredith.

She trusted the authorities carrying out justice but lied to them (see original analysis) and blamed another.



It was another shock to find myself accused and arrested. I needed a lot of time to accept that reality, of being accused, and redefined unjustly. I was in prison, my photo was everywhere.

note that she mentions her photo published. Journalists have written that she appeared, initially, to enjoy the attention. Her photo taken is important to her, which is why it entered her statement.

Insidious, unjust, nasty gossip about my private life circulated about me.

Note that this gossip was about her "private life" and note order:
"insidious"
"unjust"
"nasty"



Living through this experience has been unacceptable for me. I have trusted above all to the hope that everything will be arranged as it should have been, and that this enormous error about me will be recognized, and that every day that I spend in a cell and in court is one day nearer to my liberty. This is my consolation, in the darkness, that lets me live without despairing, doing my best to continue my life as I always have, in contact with my dear friends and my family, dreaming about the future.

What allows her to be consoled is that she is closer to liberty with each passing day.

Now, I am unjustly condemned, and more aware than ever of this hard and undeserved reality. I still hope for justice, and dream about a future. Even if this experience of three years weighs me down with anguish and fear, here I am, in front of you, more intimidated than ever, not because I'm afraid or could ever be afraid of the truth,

Note that the subject tells us what she is not afraid of


but because I have already seen justice go wrong. The truth about me and Raffaele is not yet recognized, and we are paying with our lives for a crime that we did not commit.

Note the order: "me and Raffaele" with regards to the truth


He and I deserve freedom, like everyone in this courtroom today.

Note the order: "He and I" with regards to freedom.

We don't deserve the three years that we already paid, and we certainly don't deserve more.

Note here that she uses "we" in regards to time served


I am innocent. Raffaele is innocent. We did not kill Meredith.

This is a weak denial.
"I am innocent" is not "I didn't do it" but then is weakened further by the use of "we". She has the need to speak for him as well. This, along with "we" indicates that the two are tied together; whereas one cannot be guilty without the other being guilty; one cannot be innocent without the other being innocent.


I beg you to truly consider that an enormous mistake has been made in regard to us.

Note "mistake" regarding a conviction of murder.
Note "us" continuing to tie herself to Raffaele


No justice is rendered to Meredith or her dear ones by taking our lives away and making us pay for something we didn't do.

Note that here we have the denial of "didn't do" but it is weakened by the pronoun "we". "I didn't do it"; first person singular, past tense, is strongest. Of course, there is nothing to stop a lawyer from writing out a statement for her to read as we know in Statement Analysis, the "I didn't do it" must be in the freely edited process of the subject, such as Richard Jewell, while the subject is speaking for himself, unrehearsed. When this is done, an innocent person will say that they didn't do it, and accept nothing else. The innocent person has no "we", and has no need to minimize what happened because they do not have an emotional attachment (hate, rage, anger, etc) to the crime; therefore, the innocent person will often use harsh terminology, whereas we see, particularly in brutal murders, softer language, such as "I would never harm him" or "I wouldn't hurt her" when talking about murder but ONLY while the person's mind is choosing the words to speak. This is the editing process that we all exercise. It must be free (this is why we note reflected language in interviews and why we are careful to ask open ended questions whenever possible).

I am not the person that the prosecution says I am, not at all.

Note that in an answer with the word "no" that each word that follows "no" weakens, even if slightly, the statement.


According to them, I'm a dangerous, diabolical, jealous, uncaring and violent girl.

This is something we find in guilty statements where the subject frames truthful words together, such as "you think I did it". (See the example in Scripture regarding the trial of Christ as "king" of the Jews). It is Amanda Knox who frames these words:

"I'm a dangerous, diabolical, jealous, uncaring, and violent girl" within her statement. This is not something that innocent people do because they do not have the connection (emotionally or intellectually) with the description.
If someone says to you "you think I cheated on you!", the wording shows an increased in the percentages that the subject cheated on you. It is not to be taken by itself; but upon the whole. If something is 70% likely, it still is 30% unlikely. But when taken with other indicators, it can reveal if the person cheated. Note the innocents generally cannot connect themselves with guilty words in this manner. Given the many indicators of deception in her early statements, it would appear that Amanda Knox is recognizing things about herself. It would be interesting to learn the Italian word for "girl" rather than "woman". Again, Statement Analysis is best conducted in the language of the statement.




Their hypotheses depend on this. But I've never been that girl. Never.

Note two things: previously, she stated that she has always been herself. Note also that she repeats the word "never" which increases the sensitivity of the statment.


The people who know me are witnesses of my personality. My past, I mean my real past, not the one talked about in the tabloids, proves that I've always been like this, like I really am,

Something may be lost in translation here, especially in the words ""that I've always been like this..." following the tabloids. It does not flow, which may suggest translation difficulty.

and if all this is not enough, I ask you, I invite you, I ask you to ask the people who have been guarding me for three years. Ask them if I have ever been violent, aggressive or uncaring in front of the suffering that is part of the broken lives in prison.

Knox offers her behavior in prison as proof that she is not violent. I do not think "in front" is meant as deceptive (as if she has been violent, just not in front of others) but is convoluted in translation. The way to verify the meaning is to either ask her to explain it in English, or check not only her prison record, but interview other prisoners.


Because I assure you that I'm not like that. I assure you that I have never resembled the images painted by the prosecution.

note "resembled"

How could it be possible that I could be capable of achieving the kind of violence that Meredith suffered? How could it be possible that I could throw myself like that at the opportunity to hurt one of my friends?

Note again the wording that is phrased. On general terms, the innocent do not frame guilty language within their sentences, even when posed as a question or an exclamatory statement.


such a violence, as though it were more important and more natural than all my teaching, all my values, all my dreams and my whole life? All this is not possible.

That girl is not me. I am the girl that I have always shown myself to be and have always been. I repeat that I also am asking for justice. Raffaele and I are innocent, and we want to live our lives in freedom. We are not responsible for Meredith's death, and, I repeat, no justice is accomplished by taking our lives away. [Whispers: “okay”] Um, thank you

We still not have have a strong denial from Amanda Knox.

Note that many words have been skipped due to possible translation issues. She does frame words in a manner of guilt, but more reliable are her statements made early on, and to the press when she spoke in English. Italian Statement analysis would be better, though the analysts there must use caution as Italian is her second language.

http://seamusoriley.blogspot.com/2010/08/amanda-knox-statement.html
What is best for our understanding is when she speaks English and the analysis is done in English.

No comments: