Wednesday, November 27, 2013

Deputy Jeremy Banks 911 Call Analzyed

The Scientific Content Analysis (SCAN) system was developed by Avinoam Sapir, and it is the basis for all Statement Analysis today.  Mr. Sapir's website is LSI   Any claim to the contrary is fraudulent and intellectual theft.

He taught investigators to begin with "the expected" and to then analyze the "unexpected."  This is the same everywhere there is communication, including emails, texts, interviews, and 911 calls.

This is a domestic homicide call where the victim  Michelle O’Connell died.  The NY Times article has mocked the investigation into the 2010 death.  I would like to analyze the transcripts of Jeremy Banks' interview.  It will reveal the truth of whether he murdered her, or if she committed suicide.  Statement Analysis always gets to the truth. 

                                    What do we expect from a 911 call?

We expect urgency, therefore, in a domestic homicide, we do not expect a greeting.  (See Sergio Celis, Tiffany Hartley 911 calls).

We do expect someone to be upset and not giggling when his 7 year old child is missing  (also see Sergio Celis).

We do expect the caller to ask for help for the victim.  This is what Avinoam Sapir called, quite simply, the "expected."  If someone does not, who does the caller ask for help for?

We listen, in every statement, for an apology of any kind.

We listen for truth, and not qualifiers.  We use the same principles of analysis applied everywhere in statements.  We set up what we expect ("I didn't do it") versus what we hear ("Dead squirrels crawled up my engine...") and we are faced with the unexpected for analysis.

Deputy Jeremy Banks made this 911 call.  First is the transcript, then it is repeated, with emphasis added, with Statement Analysis in bold type.

Question for Analyst:  Does Jeremy Banks make this call as a caller with guilty knowledge of the death of Michelle O'Connell?

PS:  More to come on this case.  See http://www.sjso.org/releases/O'Connell%20Case%20Review.pdf


911 Call.

DISPATCHER: 911.

JEREMY BANKS: HEY! Please get someone to my house! It’s 4700 Sherlock Place. Please!

DISPATCHER: What’s going on?

JEREMY BANKS: Please! Send─ my girlfriend, I THINK she just shot herself! There’s blood everywhere!

DISPATCHER: She what?

JEREMY BANKS: She shot herself! Please! [unintelligible] Get someone here please.

DISPATCHER: Ma’am? Ma’am, I need you to calm down.

JEREMY BANKS: It’s mister! It’s SIR!

DISPATCHER: Ma’am, listen to me─

JEREMY BANKS: It’s SIR! It’s SIR. Listen─ hang on, LET ME TELL YOU THE TRUTH. I’m Deputy Banks with the St. Johns County Sheriff’s Office. I work with y’all. Get someone here now!

DISPATCHER: Ok i need you to calm down you know how it goes. Whats the address ? I don't..

JEREMY BANKS: 4700 Sherlock Place.

DISPATCHER: Ok what's going on there?

JEREMY BANKS: My girlfriend has just shot herself with my duty weapon. Please get someone here now please.

DISPATCHER: Sir were doing that while in talking to you. is she still breathing ?

JEREMY BANKS: No,there is blood coming out of everywhere.-please.

DISPATCHER: Ok, she's not breathing.

JEREMY BANKS: Call dispatch on Tac 2, get them here now.

DISPATCHER: Sir their on the phone i need you to calm down.

JEREMY BANKS: Please please please-

DISPATCHER: Jeremy were coming as fast as we can ok? Calm down for me ok.

JEREMY BANKS: Please, you don't understand she just shot herself, pleases get someone here.

Here is now the same transcript (thanks John!) with analysis and emphasis added.

911 Call.

DISPATCHER: 911.

JEREMY BANKS: HEY! Please get someone to my house! It’s 4700 Sherlock Place. Please!

I'm not sure if everyone will consider that "Hey" is a greeting of sorts, but I believe it is.  
Note that the caller does not here ask for help for the victim, only to get "someone" to his house.  




DISPATCHER: What’s going on?

JEREMY BANKS: Please! Send─ my girlfriend, I THINK she just shot herself! There’s blood everywhere!

I'm not a big fan of capitalizing things spoken, but these are the transcripts I have to work with. 

Please notice the weak commitment.  He only "thinks" she has "just" shot herself.  He does not know this?  He is unable to bring himself to say "she shot herself" at first.  He allows for someone to "think" that someone else may have shot her, or even for himself to think contrary.  

He does not specifically ask for help for the victim....yet.  

DISPATCHER: She what?

JEREMY BANKS: She shot herself! Please! [unintelligible] Get someone here please.

He now drops the word "think" from his initial statement.  

DISPATCHER: Ma’am? Ma’am, I need you to calm down.

oops.  

JEREMY BANKS: It’s mister! It’s SIR!

Not only does he want to clarify his gender, but he wants to be respected:  call him "Sir"

This is likely more important than many realize.  When a man holds a gun, he holds power and authority.  Those unarmed are at a significant disadvantage.  Insecure law officers are  a danger and menace to society.  There is little nobility in hiding behind a bush and pulling over a driver for going 10mph faster than others, just to make money, so when someone with insecurity is given authority, much patience is needed when said cop approaches a car.  

Yet, this is also significant because we are all wondering if there was domestic violence in this relationship and the more insecure he is, the more I am going to wonder if his girlfriend did not show him the "respect" he feels he needs.  This one word, "Sir!" would have sent Domestic Violence expert Susan Murphy Milano into writing an entire article about insecure and demanding law enforcement:  her own father was one, who killed her mother. 
DISPATCHER: Ma’am, listen to me─

His voice did sound high at this point.  Let's now see if the insecurity of not being addressed as "Sir!" matters:

JEREMY BANKS: It’s SIR! It’s SIR. Listen─ hang on, Let me tell you the truth. I’m Deputy Banks with the St. Johns County Sheriff’s Office. I work with y’all. Get someone here now!

"Sir" is repeated, making the title of respect sensitive to the subject.  If you know anything about domestic violence, you're choking on this one now. 

But next he signals that he is deceptive:  he prefaces his words with "Let me tell you the truth."  This is a strong indication that what he is about to say is true, but other things may not be.  

"I'm Deputy Banks"; note that he uses title, rather than first and last name.  He sounds like one who is desperate for respect.  This does not bode well for the girlfriend.  

Note that he now demands that they get someone out there, but fails to ask for help for the victim.  He does not beg, he orders.  This is part of who he is. 

DISPATCHER: Ok i need you to calm down you know how it goes. Whats the address ? I don't..

JEREMY BANKS: 4700 Sherlock Place.

DISPATCHER: Ok what's going on there?

This is the best question.  It allows him to begin his statement where he chooses, as well as choose his own words:  
JEREMY BANKS: My girlfriend has just shot herself with my duty weapon. Please get someone here now please.

Note that he no longer "thinks" she shot herself, but goes into extra detail.  Not only did she shoot herself, but did so with his weapon; his "duty" weapon.  He is no longer just "Sir" calling who thinks his girlfriend might have shot herself, he has changed:  he is now "Deputy Banks", sounding self important, and demanding, acknowledging that the weapon was his "duty" weapon and it belonged to him.   He returns to "please" (repeated) rather than order, but he still has not asked for help for the victim. 
DISPATCHER: Sir were doing that while in talking to you. is she still breathing ?

JEREMY BANKS: No,there is blood coming out of everywhere.-please.

Specifically, where is blood coming out of?
DISPATCHER: Ok, she's not breathing.

JEREMY BANKS: Call dispatch on Tac 2, get them here now.

Deputy Banks is now telling Dispatch how to do its job.  He still, however, hasn't asked for help for the victim.  
DISPATCHER: Sir their on the phone i need you to calm down.

JEREMY BANKS: Please please please-

DISPATCHER: Jeremy were coming as fast as we can ok? Calm down for me ok.

JEREMY BANKS: Please, you don't understand she just shot herself, pleases get someone here.


Here is leakage.  He has first reported that she may have shot herself, but then changed to the affirmative, without question.  Yet, he feels the need to persuade with "you don't understand."

What does Dispatch not understand?  This is something that readers may wish to question. 

It may be that he has failed to sound convincing to the Dispatcher, that in spite of repeating that she shot herself, he has failed to cause Dispatch to "understand" this?

He did not ask for help for his victim and there are signals in his call that he may not be telling the truth.  What it is that is to be understood is that he needed to persuade Dispatch that she shot herself.  Why would he need them to understand this?  Would it matter, to the bleeding victim, who pulled the trigger?

It matters very much to the caller.  

I would be very surprised if the victim's family did not hear of at least some reports of domestic violence or threatening by this caller.  

It is a short call, but there are signals that Deputy Jeremy Banks was not truthful in this call.  

Thanks to John for the transcription!  

43 comments:

Anonymous said...

this is really interesting to read. the times article was awesome too. I can see how "hey" in indeed a greeting. it matters a lot. his first priority is to establish alliance.

also -- how much he avoids describing the condition of the victim. like how he doesn't say where she is bleeding -- but also that he just doesn't describe her. he's a cop -- he's got to be used to visually summarizing a situation. but he completely -- avoids doing this

OverAnalysis said...

While I agree with all of the analysis regarding the respectful positional aspect of the word SIR, in this circumstance it may merely be the descriptive counterpart of the word MA'AM for clarification.

Trigger said...

I agree that "Hey" is a greeting.

He is alibi building right from the start.

He needs to be addressed as "Sir" and he needs to have control over the information that is related to the 911 operator.

He uses the word "Please" in regards to his need, not the needs of the gunshot victim.

He needs to qualify himself as the authority in this event and connect with the operator on a professional level, yet fails to ask for help for his girlfriend.

Trigger said...

What do we expect in a 911 call?

asking for help for someone who is hurt, first and most importantly.

Anonymous said...

Are all 911 calls a matter of public record? 10 years ago, a friend took her own life by shooting herself. She had made several previous attempts but therapy seemed to be helping. She knew she was in trouble and called her fiance at work and told him she needed him to come home. He didn't make it fast enough. He didn't think she knew how to fill a black powder shell so he had not removed that ammo. Anyway, when the rescue squad got there he was throwing up in the front yard after finding her and fleeing the house. Despite her previous attempts they did investigate her fiance just to rule out a domestic situation, but forensics plus the time from clocking out to when the neighbors reported a gun blast didn't bgive him time. I wonder if I could acquire his 911 call for analysis.

Catharina said...

OT


"My fear is that I`m looking for two adult shallow graves and...my two nephews` crosses. Michael McStay said this to the Orange County Register shortly after his brother and family disappeared on February 4, 2010. *(Quote is from a People article)

Peter, can you analyze the statements of Michael McStay? He seems to have had an uncanny prediction?

Buckley said...

"OverAnalysis said...
While I agree with all of the analysis regarding the respectful positional aspect of the word SIR, in this circumstance it may merely be the descriptive counterpart of the word MA'AM for clarification."

I thought that too, but at the same time he first says "mister" to correct the gender but adds "SIR" quickly afterwards. In his frantic state, he quickly corrects to get the correct descriptive counterpart. but at first only "thinks" she shot herself, can't state where she is bleeding. With "SIR" he is being attentive to detail.

Lemon said...

My first question on listening to the 911 call - was "hey" considered a greeting? Thanks for analyzing this.

Anonymous said...

OT: Article from yesterday, November 26th.

PROSECUTOR LAYS OUT CASE IN AMANDA KNOX RE-TRIAL

The prosecution in the new trials of U.S. exchange student Amanda Knox and her former Italian boyfriend Raffaele Sollecito for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher is asking the court in Florence to hand down a guilty verdict and sentences of 26 years in prison for both. The prosecutor argued Knox should also spend an additional 4 years behind bars for slander.


http://www.cbsnews.com/news/closing-arguments-lay-out-case-against-amanda-knox/

Nic said...

OT,

On a happier note, Happy Thanksgiving to Peter, Heather and family, and all our American friends.

Hugs,
Nic

Anonymous said...

http://gothamist.com/2013/11/27/receipt_saga_server_lied_about_havi.php#photo-1

Anonymous said...

OverAnalysis, why bother clarifying if the caller is a man or a woman when someones life may be on the line? Is that really the time to worry about someone calling you by a title for the wrong gender?

Rose said...

Did you all see the thing on the former marine waitress who had an anti gay rant written on the tip line of the credit card slip?

http://happyplace.someecards.com/27805/gay-former-marine-waitress-may-have-faked-the-hateful-note-on-her-receipt

It was a hoax. The waitress has all the classic statement analysis tells.

dadgum said...

'hey' is a common greeting in rural areas, notably in the South.

sidewalk super said...

If I have a formerly loved one lying akimbo on my living room floor bleeding profusely while dying, I'm not going to be haggling the 911 operator about my gender and title.

john said...

Hi All,

Would someone try the search engine on the right hand side please and see if it works for them. Every time i try and put a specific word in, Ie, "Because" "so" etc, nothing is coming up.

Thanks.

wildpitch40 said...

Peter, I agree with Catherine. Michael McStay's comment on two shallow graves reminds me of "the ugly field" comment. Can you do SA on his statements?

john said...

Happy Thanksgiving Peter and family, and to all.

Great Article too, and well done to Sean. :-)

Hobnob said...

HI John i had the samer problem, i thought it was my beastie having a tantrum due to the large number of windows and tabs i have open at any one time .

Lemon said...

Bonus points for "akimbo" :)

Anonymous said...

hey, is a "greeting" to someone who is about to be given an order by someone who thinks they are your authority but you do not know that. the "sir" correction, gender was not enough, a dispatch has to call a deputy Sir. he was trying to call it in as a regular civilian, but then he told dispatch the truth, he was a deputy. ego was his downfall.
because she used his duty firearm, he knew he was in deep doo doo, that is why he wanted someone to come down there, his rep.
he surely knew she was dead before he called, that is why he didnt ask for help for her.

Anonymous said...

Thank you so much for posting and analyzing the call. I was so disgusted by the story, and really wanted to read your take on the deputy's statement. I pray for justice for Michelle.

Anonymous said...

The victim's hands were on their hips? No points for akimbo.

Anonymous said...

Akimbo is a human position where the hands are placed on the hips and the elbows are bent outward.

How does this description fit here in describing the victims' position while lying on the floor dying?

Agreed. No points for akimbo.

Lemon said...

2. Being in a bent, bowed, or arched position: "There he remained, dead to the world, limbs akimbo, until we left"

pwned.

Anonymous said...

"There HE remained"?

Akimbo does not describe or fit the description this poor murdered woman was found in at the time of her death.

Anonymous said...

Thank you for doing this analysis. The call is very disturbing to her family and friends and we are doing all we can to get justice for our beloved Michelle. BTW To the person that concludes that he didnt ask for help for her because he knew she was already gone, this is untrue. She was alive and suffering for about 20 minutes after the EMTs arrived. Therefore he was not concerned with getting her help, he was however concerned about how he was addressed, because he is insecure and arrogant. Please Like & Share our page to show your support in getting Justice for Michelle & getting this case into a Grand Jury:
https://m.facebook.com/justiceformichelleoconnell?__user=100004174480524

Please write Governor Rick Scott ask asking him to re-assign a prosecutor to take this case to trial.
Rick.scott@eog.myflorida.com

We are also asking that you take a moment to sign our petition on Change.org for a Grand Jury:
http://www.change.org/petitions/brad-king-bring-michelle-o-connells-case-to-a-grand-jury

Watch the Full Story on Frontline here:

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/death-in-st-augustine/

Read the full Story in NYTimes here:
http://www.nytimes.com/projects/2013/two-gunshots/?hp

Anonymous said...

Even though I'm not a big fan of nancy grace, can you see if she can help spread the word.

Anonymous said...

If my girlfriend just shot herself I wouldn't care if the dispatcher called me ma'am, miss, grandma, Obama, whatever. I would want help for her!

Anonymous said...

Scumbag got away with murder and all the cops around him are culpable. I can see why people like George Zimmerman lives in Florida.

Anonymous said...

I saw part of thus story on Frontline last night, too busy cooking but I did hear the 911 call. Heis screeching, high pitched cries sounds very feminine over the phone. It was mentioned that he had alcohol on his breath. Strong odor, reeking of alcohol. I think he shot her in a fit of drunken rage. One split second of rage....HE SHOT HER.

Anonymous said...

What interested me was his saying that he "thinks" she shot herself but seemed to have backfired according to his agenda, so he had to "make them understand" that she had shot herself with his police duty firearm. During a short two minute call you're not going to suddenly realize that she had absolutely shot herself, and with your own gun, you're too busy talking on the phone. And on the actual 911 call in the Frontline episode, as often happens in 911 calls where the caller is the killer, they have to force emotion that is not there, and it sounds fake and contrived emotionally, and that is why the 911 receptionist thought he was a woman, which is funny in that he had to reassert his gender, LOL!

If you watch all the Dateline and other murder mysteries on tv where the murderer slips up is when they are trying to show the emotion expected of them, but it's always either way over the top, or there is no emotion at all. It's just not easy when you've killed someone to convincingly show others that you are sincerely grieving for that person. The emotions that overrule all others are fear and guilt, not sadness and concern, and those close to the victim can usually tell something is just not right in the way the person is acting.

Joe said...

Can you do a review of the actual statement he gave to police, rather than the 911 call. I'd be especially interested in that.

Joe said...

Could you do analysis in the complete statement given to police rather than just the 911 call? I'd be especially interested in seeing that

Peter Hyatt said...

do you have a link or can post the statement?

Anonymous said...

Can you analyze his interview on Dateline tonight at 9:00?

Anonymous said...

I am "sorry" but this is another case of suicide-denial and I have seen a ton too many of them.

In a state of shock, the words placed for an emergency number can't be that analysed - the brain is processing visual images and processing speech along with a new paradigm and actually trying to act while the body tries to "shut down".
This is reminding me of a sad denial by the mother of Sheena Morris (read the report). Denial is an amazing thing..

Hasn't anyone imagined that "Hey" is also the reaction you have when you have an emergency and you try to stop a car in the freeway? Hey is to get the attention when something happens. Trying to say you're SIR and who you are is certainly a way to get them at you faster (since it's recognition is possible, it's almost certain you would try to use it). Also, within the confusion you'd think that it doesn't matter anyone confuses you gender-wise or otherwise.
But no - In such cases, for multiple reasons I'll not name now (long) if you feel you are not being rightfully interpreted by the only help you can get (on minute details) you feel help won't come to you and anger will strike (bad reception on the phone can cause people to scream at 911 operators, operators hearing them wrong triggers rage, cars that won't stop to aid will get hurt people to rage as well)...

And no matter how a person "loves life", cares for a child, "and would neeeeeeeeever"... interferes with the ability of a mental illness taking its toll (in less then 5mins).

Dennis Swearingen said...

JEREMY BANK'S urgency over the phone was OVERPLAYED by himself. HE TO DISTRACT THE OPERATOR FROM ASKING ANY QUESTIONS ABOUT WHAT HAPPENED BECAUSE HE NOT HAD A STORY TOGETHER YET. Also he say "YOU DON'T UNDERSTAND SHE JUST SHOT HERSELF" Most in a real case of suicide in that urgency would have said "YOU DON'T UNDERSTAND SHE IS DYING AND NEEDS HELP HURRY NOW" He is trying to rush the operator even though he states that she is already dead but it was proven that she wasn't actually dead yet. Had he believed she was dead and he was truly innocent he most like would have been crying and on his hands and knees helping her or holding her in devastation...

Jon Maher said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Anonymous said...

Scott O'Connel=Real life Caleb Prior(Divergent)

Reid said...

the tell-tale sign is the fully prepped "high pitched voice" and fake "hyperventilating" breathing that you can tell he prepped himself up for prior to the 911 call.

After the 911 dispatcher calls him "ma'am" he completely forgets his cliche "breath heavy and panicked voice" routine that he feels is congruent with the situation.

I agree with most of this analysis but in relistening to the call - the pathetic transition from fake staged "pump myself up for 911 call" to regular voice minus fake hyperventilating at "ma'am" stage is key.

Peter Hyatt said...

Reid,

Interesting comment. Thank you, Peter

Anonymous said...

I thought the same thing as Reid when I heard the 911 call on Front Line. He instantly goes from sounding freaked out to collected.