Thursday, July 24, 2014

Statement Analysis: Gender

When Bill Clinton first ran for the presidency, in accepting the Democratic nomination, he thanked two people.  Statement Analysis of this has been done repeatedly, but for those who have not read it, the order, and the wording was noted:

1.  He thanked his mother before he thanked his wife, Hillary.

2.  He said that his mother was the most "important woman" in his life, while he said Hillary was the most important "person" in his life.

By calling his mother a "woman" and his wife a "person" he did the unexpected, which gave question to:

Was Bill Clinton closer to his mother?  Might he have been a victim of abuse?  Would this abuse likely have been sexual?

His sexual behaviors suggest as much.  Sexual abuse, especially in the early formative years, is devastating to the brain development, including the inhibition of natural boundaries of a child, which is why we see, at times, such self destructive, risk-taking behavior of adult victims of childhood sexual abuse.

We now learn in a new book that Hillary Clinton blamed her mother-in-law's abuse of Bill for his "sex addiction" in life:

A year after the Monica Lewinsky scandal shook the presidency, Hillary Clinton told an interviewer that Bill Clinton’s mother abused him and caused his sex addiction, an explosive new book claims.
The comments were made to Pulitzer-prize winning journalist Lucinda Franks in a 1999 interview - and Franks admits in her new memoir that she watered them down for publication.
The Daily News obtained galleys of the memoir, due out next month, in which Franks — the wife of former Manhattan District Attorney Robert Morgenthau — reveals that she published only part of the interview in the piece she wrote for Tina Brown's short-lived Talk magazine and focused on the conflict between the President's mother and grandmother rather than direct abuse.
In her book, Franks recounts Hillary Clinton’s comments about Bill’s mother Virginia Kelley.



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Bill Clinton with his mother, Virginia Kelley, in Little Rock, Ark., minutes before Clinton delivered a farewell speech to the people of Arkansas before leaving for Washington to be inaugurated.
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  • President Clinton hugs his mother Virginia Kelley as his step-father Richard Kelley looks on during  the Arkansas Ball, Wednesday night at the Washington Convention Center.  (AP Photo/Greg Gibson)
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She was a “doozy," Hillary said, according to the book.
Kelley, who was married to Bill's abusive alcoholic stepfather Roger Clinton during the future President's formative years, hurt her son "in ways you wouldn't believe," the then-First Lady continued, according to Franks.

"He was abused. When a mother does what she does, it affects you forever," Hillary said, according to the new book


She did not specify the nature of the abuse but said it was the source of her husband’s infidelities. "I am not going into it, but I'll say that when this happens in children, it scars you," she said, according to Franks’ account. "You keep looking in all the wrong places for the parent who abused you."
In the original 1999 Talk piece, Hillary Clinton's description of her husband's tough childhood spoke more hazily about an abusive atmosphere — focusing more on Kelley's problems with her mother Edith Cassidy, who cared for Bill when he was small.
"He was so young, barely 4, when he was scarred by abuse and he can't even take it out and look at it," Hillary was quoted as saying in Talk's debut issue.


Web graphic for June 24,2014
"There was terrible conflict between his mother and grandmother. A psychologist once told me that for for a boy, being in the middle of a conflict between two women is the worst possible situation. There is always a desire to please each one," she said.
Attempts to reach Franks were not immediately successful Wednesday, and the Clintons did not immediately respond to requests for comment.
In the galleys of her new book, "Timeless: Love, Morgenthau and Me," Franks said Hillary never gave her the specifics of Kelley's alleged abuse.



39 comments:

Buckley said...

2. He said that his mother was the most "important woman" in his life, while he said Hillary was the most important "person" in his life.

By calling his mother a "woman" and his wife a "person" he did the unexpected"


Peter, it would be a mildly interesting contrast if it were true. In the speech you reference, Clinton does not say his mother was the "most important" woman in his life. He talks about her influence, and later (as he goes through his life in *chronological* order, as opposed to order of importance) does refer to Hillary as the most important "person" in his life.

But he didn't make the "woman" vs "person" contrast you assert.

If he didn't say it, why are you stating it for him?

http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/?pid=25958

Anonymous said...

Buckley said...
2. He said that his mother was the most "important woman" in his life, while he said Hillary was the most important "person" in his life.

By calling his mother a "woman" and his wife a "person" he did the unexpected"

Peter, it would be a mildly interesting contrast if it were true. In the speech you reference, Clinton does not say his mother was the "most important" woman in his life. He talks about her influence, and later (as he goes through his life in *chronological* order, as opposed to order of importance) does refer to Hillary as the most important "person" in his life.

But he didn't make the "woman" vs "person" contrast you assert.

If he didn't say it, why are you stating it for him?

http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/?pid=25958


July 24, 2014 at 11:07 AM
-----------------------------

Because Peter has a sick fascination with pedophilia and likes to insinuate that everyone was sexually abused.

Buckley said...

I never met my father. He was killed in a car wreck on a rainy road three months before I was born, driving from Chicago to Arkansas to see my mother.

After that, my mother had to support us, so we lived with my grandparents while she went back to Louisiana to study nursing. I can still see her clearly tonight through the eyes of a three-year-old, kneeling at the railroad station and weeping as she put me back on the train to Arkansas with my grandmother.

She endured that pain because she knew her sacrifice was the only way she could support me and give me a better life. My mother taught me. She taught me about family and hard work and sacrifice. She held steady through tragedy after tragedy, and she held our family - my brother and I - together through tough times.

As a child, I watched her go off work each day at a time when it wasn't always easy to be a working mother.

As an adult, I watched her fight off breast cancer, and again she has taught me a lesson in courage. And always, always, always she taught me to fight.

That's why I'll fight to create high-paying jobs so that parents can afford to raise their children today.

That's why I'm so committed to make sure every American gets the health care that saved my mother's life and that women's health care gets the same attention as men's.

That's why I'll fight to make sure women in this country receive respect and dignity, whether they work in the home, out of the home, or both.

You want to know where I get my fighting spirit? It all started with my mother. Thank you, Mother. I love you.

Buckley said...

I think it's just that he's much more loose with facts and language when the topic is political. He loses objectivity and his bias is obvious, which, when couching in the name of the "science" of "statement analysis" is an Achilles heel.

john said...

I would want to know, what, her, subjective internal dictionary definition of "abuse" is?

"Abuse" comes in all forms, not just sexual.

john said...

Hi Buckley,

I respect your input and comments, and i enjoy reading your posts.

Anonymous said...

Check out the poem "Pop" supposedely written by obama when he was in college. if you want indications of sexual abuse.

Anonymous said...

I dont doubt both clintons were horribly abused as kids. but i think its cause they were programmed by cia. their parents may have assisted.

Anonymous said...

Buckly stays.

Anonymous said...

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/05/18/us/politics/18poems.html?_r=0

Obama poems

Dacea said...

Buckley is well within proper boundaries of posting about statement analysis. If you are going to post something for analysis, it should be accurate so the analysis is accurate.

Also, Buckley has been respectful and well spoken and I appreciate the truth he has shared. I say this as a conservative republican who is not a fan of Bill Clinton.

Anonymous said...

It appears Buckly and Anon below are one and the same. Arguing 101010 poetic style to get to the conspiracy of mind controlled sex slaves.

These dueling dynamos are most likely to stalk their prey via scripts on Youtube. In real life, they are more about securing slaves for themselves via stalking and extortion.

Having said that, Hillary would say anything and blame any woman to get into political office.

Not buying it.

john said...

OT,

Brother of missing teen, Erica Parsons, sorry investigation 'got out of control'

Interview:

http://www.kpho.com/story/26098050/jamie-parsons-on-his-missing-adopted-sister-erica-i-put-in-for-a-missing-persons-report-i-didnt-put-in-for-a-body

Buckley said...

Good find, John- some interesting quotes:

Wednesday afternoon when the 21-year-old sat down with WBTV, he said of the abuse, "half the time I didn't see stuff just like that - no. I didn't see physically abusing as what people are trying to put."

"Half the time"
"Stuff just like that"
"As people are trying to put"

He can't deny he saw abuse.

"I'm not changing the story. I'm just saying my mom is trying to help too. She's not as guilty as everybody keeps saying she is. She might be. From my point of view she's not. That's my opinion."

How guilty is she then? "Point of view...My opinion"

Anonymous said...

POP

Sitting in his seat, a seat broad and broken
In, sprinkled with ashes
Pop switches channels, takes another
Shot of Seagrams, neat, and asks
What to do with me, a green young man
Who fails to consider the
Flim and flam of the world, since
Things have been easy for me;
I stare hard at his face, a stare
That deflects off his brow;
I’m sure he’s unaware of his
Dark, watery eyes, that
Glance in different directions,
And his slow, unwelcome twitches,
Fail to pass.
I listen, nod,
Listen, open, till I cling to his pale,
Beige T-shirt, yelling,
Yelling in his ears, that hang
With heavy lobes, but he’s still telling
His joke, so I ask why
He’s so unhappy, to which he replies...
But I don’t care anymore, cause
He took too damn long, and from
Under my seat, I pull out the
Mirror I’ve been saving; I’m laughing,
Laughing loud, the blood rushing from his face
To mine, as he grows small,
A spot in my brain, something
That may be squeezed out, like a
Watermelon seed between
Two fingers.
Pop takes another shot, neat,
Points out the same amber
Stain on his shorts that I’ve got on mine, and
Makes me smell his smell, coming
From me; he switches channels, recites an old poem
He wrote before his mother died,
Stands, shouts, and asks
For a hug, as I shrink, my
Arms barely reaching around
His thick, oily neck, and his broad back; ’cause
I see my face, framed within
Pop’s black-framed glasses
And know he’s laughing too.

- Barack Obama

Anonymous said...

Buckley,

Thank you for your comments. I come here when I can because I find this is a site that teaches how to get to the Truth. When there is need for correction, it needs to be honored.

I was touched to read about your mother. She was a good role model, and a woman of noble character. It was not an easy road to travel, but she did the right thing for her children. Life does involve difficult choices. She left you temporarily to make things better in the long run. I'm sorry you never meet or experienced knowing your father.

Soph

Anonymous said...

I agree with John, what is Hillary's internal dictionary for abuse? Would Hillary open up and tell anyone, and if so who, about sexual abuse? I wasn't sure what to make of this 'revelation' when I saw the headline yesterday.

Lately, there seems to be a barrage of books about sexual exploits written by aging hollywood people. More of the Enquirer type of leanings, imho. I would like to know more about the author who wrote Hillary told him Bill was abused 'sexually' by his mother.

Soph

Buckley said...

Thanks, Soph, but I think you are referring to the transcript of Clinton's speech, the one Peter refers to in his post. Sorry, I thought the context and italics would make that clear. I should have labelled it.

Anonymous said...

it's hard to imagine that Hillary would be completely transparent in her feelings about Bill cheating,

I can't help wondering if the quote has more to do with how Bill views Hillary.

what does it mean and not mean that he refers to her as a person.

I've noticed men often reffer to women as people, even whe they veiw them romantically.

Peter Hyatt said...

It's a lot of dysfunction but it does remind me of the original analysis, done many years ago, by Mr. Sapir.

He is the one who pointed out that the mother was a "woman" while the wife was just a "person."

Over the years, I have learned to not be surprised to see Mr. Sapir's analysis be proven correct.

Anonymous said...

my guess is that the clintons are a professional team and not a romantic marriage. there may be plenty more to it, but I think that would explain it unto itself as well.

Anonymous said...

does anybody have an opinion of Obama's poem??

I find it laden with imagery of sexual abuse and psychological manipulation.

there's argument out there that obama only passed it off as his own and it was really written by frank marshall davis. maybe thats the case but if so I think it just makes it more evident that frank marshall davis was the guy abusing Obama when he was a kid, ad he wrote the poem as commemorative reiforcement.

I'd be interested if anybody has a different take on it. I realize it's not conclusive evidence of anything -- but I think it sure supports reason to be suspicious.

Sus said...

Thank you, Buckley, for pointing out the mistaken quote. And for Bill Clinton's speech about his mother.

Hillary nor Bill has ever said that Bill was sexually abused. It is well documented that his mother left him with his grandparents. I wonder from Bill's words if it was a back and forth thing...like his mother had him when it was convenient for her. It would seem so when Hillary says there was some type of struggle between his mother and grandmother. Notice how Bill describes the sacrifice his mother made by leaving him and how hard it was on her. How did it affect him? I get the feeling mother/son didn't form a bond because the mother was more about herself. Bill Clinton is always looking for some type of attachment, yet can't be truly close or intimate.

That's my take on the type of abuse Hillary spoke of. By the way, there is a book on Gerald Ford that was only to be published after his death. He and Mrs. Ford were in agreement that Bill Clinton is a sex addict and needs help. They also felt Hillary was the stronger of the Clinton's and wore the pants in the marriage.

Anonymous said...

Buckley,

Hahaha, thanks for clearing up the family story, which was Clinton's speech at the Democratic National Convention Presidential Nomination speech! I don't see the quote of most "important woman'" regarding his mother.

Thank you for the link which I went to:

http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/?pid=25958

In that speech he goes back to where it started, the most important influence in his life, his mother.

Later, some paraphrases further along he mentions "I learned a lot from another person....that person is my wife."

This makes sense as his mother was the first person to shape his views. Later he met Hillary who became his wife. They shared world views, had political aspirations and married. So his wife would be someone to have great influence on him.

I have read that men often cheat to have emotional needs met. There are the serial cheaters who imho are deeply insecure, though, some men would argue its in their dna. I don't agree because a good marriage provides deep bonds and deep fulfillment that is not satisfied in shallow sexual exploits, typically based on you stroke my ego, I'ill stoke your ego.

It certainly sounds odd, to say most "important woman" mother, then say wife "person." Both are females, and at the point he makes references to them both are woman.

However, I don't see the quotes Peter highlighted in this particular case said at the Nomination....???

Anonymous said...

Buckley,

that was my post, Anon, Soph

Jen Ow said...

I see Buckley provided the excerpt about Clinton's mother. The following is the excerpt from the same speech, about 'another important person'. His wife. You will notice a striking difference in his comments about Hillary, and his comments about his mother:

"I learned a lot from another person too: a person who for more than 20 years has worked hard to help our children, paying the price of time to make sure our schools don't fail them. Someone who traveled our state for a year, studying, learning, listening, going to PTA meetings, school board meetings, town hall meetings, putting together a package of school reforms recognized around the Nation, and doing it all while building a distinguished legal career and being a wonderful, loving mother.

That person is my wife."

In Clinton's words about his mother he introduces her immediately. He reference's 'women' several times. He outlines the impact she had on HIS life. She gave HIM support, taught HIM courage, taught HIM about hard work and sacrifice, etc. His mother had an impact on HIM.

The 'other person': Spent 20yrs helping OUR schools, OUR children, OUR state, etc. All of the 'other person's' accomplishments are civic in nature. They are not related to HIM in any way, although he is 'thanking' her. He only assigns gender after he lists all of the 'persons', life accomplishments. THEN-he finally calls her "a wonderful, loving mother", and as the last word of his introduction...his 'wife'.

Ouch!


Anonymous said...

Peter, are you going to admit your wrong with the quote?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous Anonymous said...
Peter, are you going to admit your wrong with the quote?


July 24, 2014 at 6:47 PM

has peter ever admitted an error? not that I've seen.

Anonymous said...

Ghostwriters, political speech writers are the norm for politicians, and many ghostwriters are used by claimed authors.

It seems to me Bill and Hillary's marriage has been more of a dual effort aimed at gaining political power and office.

People marry for different reasons. Some individuals claim not to care about romantic love, they mate for companionship foremost or mutual interest. I never witnessed "deep romantic ties" between Bill and Hillary. Our first love is with our mother, if our mother is the main nurturer. Bill may like his mother more than Hillary. It wouldn't surprise me because theirs seem to be a marriage of convenience and mutual goals. His words reflect it in that speech at the Nomination convention about Hillary

Jen Ow said...

Well, technically, there was no quote.

There was no line or excerpt quoted. Peter referenced the difference in language regarding Clinton's mother as a 'woman', and his wife as a 'person'. As well as the order they were thanked, and presented in his speech.

The difference in language is clear, as I outlined above.

Isn't that what we are here to do...note the different language a subject uses in reference to specific topics?

Bill Clinton is a public figure, and his words are just as valuable for demonstrating SA principles, as the Ramseys or the Dipeitros.

Buckley said...

Technically, there was. It's short but easily spotted with quotation marks around it in Peter's commentary.

Jen Ow said...

Hi Buckley,

I took it as a comparison of the two concepts, 'woman' / 'person'.

I don't understand why this is such an issue.

The concept being illustrated was clear to me.

Clinton DOES use woman in relation to his mother, and person in relation to his wife.

There was no LINE of the speech directly quoted.

Maybe the punctuation needs tweeking from "---", to '--', to end this distracting controversy.

Anonymous said...

I agree with Buckley.
Clinton’s Speech at Nomination Acceptance:

“I never met my father. He was killed in a car wreck on a rainy road three months before I was born, driving from Chicago to Arkansas to see my mother.

After that, my mother had to support us, so we lived with my grandparents while she went back to Louisiana to study nursing. I can still see her clearly tonight through the eyes of a three-year-old, kneeling at the railroad station and weeping as she put me back on the train to Arkansas with my grandmother.

She endured that pain because she knew her sacrifice was the only way she could support me and give me a better life. My mother taught me. She taught me about family and hard work and sacrifice. She held steady through tragedy after tragedy, and she held our family - my brother and I - together through tough times.

As a child, I watched her go off work each day at a time when it wasn't always easy to be a working mother.

As an adult, I watched her fight off breast cancer, and again she has taught me a lesson in courage. And always, always, always she taught me to fight.

That's why I'll fight to create high-paying jobs so that parents can afford to raise their children today.

That's why I'm so committed to make sure every American gets the health care that saved my mother's life and that women's health care gets the same attention as men's.

That's why I'll fight to make sure women in this country receive respect and dignity, whether they work in the home, out of the home, or both.

You want to know where I get my fighting spirit? It all started with my mother. Thank you, Mother. I love you."

Clinton calls her "Mother." "Thank you Mother. "I love you."

Anonymous said...

Several Paragraphs along, Clinton says:

"I learned a lot from another person too: a person who for more than 20 years has worked hard to help our children, paying the price of time to make sure our schools don't fail them. Someone who traveled our state for a year, studying, learning, listening, going to PTA meetings, school board meetings, town hall meetings, putting together a package of school reforms recognized around the Nation, and doing it all while building a distinguished legal career and being a wonderful, loving mother.

That person is my wife.

Hillary taught me. She taught me that all children can learn and that each of us has a duty to help them do it.

So if you want to know why I care so much about our children, and our future, it all started with Hillary. I love you."

Clinton says "that person is my wife" - (he makes reference to person who ALSO influenced his life - his mother and Hillary - persons). "Hillary, I love you."

Clinton says, "I learned a lot FROM ANOTHER PERSON TOO."

Skeptical said...

To me, his speech sounds like story telling. Bill Clinton loves drama and this speech is filled with it. How much of it is embellishment of a difficult but rather ordinary childhood and how much is truth?

Peter Hyatt said...

I first heard the analysis in a recorded lesson by Mr. Sapir; not a written transcript.

He is non political and uses statements that teach, and this one, along with his commentary, proved brilliantly accurate.

Peter

Peter Hyatt said...

Skeptical said...
To me, his speech sounds like story telling. Bill Clinton loves drama and this speech is filled with it. How much of it is embellishment of a difficult but rather ordinary childhood and how much is truth?
July 25, 2014 at 12:54 AM


I did not use a transcript, only a memory of the lecture years ago.

In it, Mr. Sapir said that Bill Clinton referenced his mother as "woman" and his wife as "person" and that pronouns are instinctive.

Instinctive.

This has nothing to do with politics but as per today, it does for commentators.

Statement Analysis is only used on left wing Democrats because we all know that right wing Republicans do not lie.
The truth speaks for itself.
Of course.

(I love "of course" in a debate!)

smile today,

Peter

Nic said...

I've always missed the 'person'/'woman' analysis discussion. In fact, I have a hard time with 'third party' descriptions because my English teacher always taught us to use "they" (third part/non descript) when speaking generally. So I don't understand the relevance.

Trigger said...

It sounds like Hillary Clinton is blaming Bill's mother for Bill's sexual prowess. The "blame-game" is a soft pillow for Hillary to hug when she feels unloved.

If Virginia is to blame for Bill's sexual prowess then she is also to blame for Bill's successes and accomplishments.

Maybe Bill is just another guy who enjoys irresponsible/reckless sex with women that he finds attractive/sexy because he likes the predictable "high" of the orgasm.

Does Bill's behavior make her feel ashamed?