Saturday, August 9, 2014

President Obama's Speech on Bombing Iraq

Good evening. Today I authorized two operations in Iraq — targeted airstrikes to protect our American personnel, and a humanitarian effort to help save thousands of Iraqi civilians who are trapped on a mountain without food and water and facing almost certain death. Let me explain the actions we're taking and why.
First, I said in June — as the terrorist group ISIL began an advance across Iraq — that the United States would be prepared to take targeted military action in Iraq if and when we determined that the situation required it. In recent days, these terrorists have continued to move across Iraq, and have neared the city of Irbil, where American diplomats and civilians serve at our consulate and American military personnel advise Iraqi forces.
To stop the advance on Irbil, I've directed our military to take targeted strikes against ISIL terrorist convoys should they move toward the city. We intend to stay vigilant, and take action if these terrorist forces threaten our personnel or facilities anywhere in Iraq, including our consulate in Irbil and our embassy in Baghdad. We're also providing urgent assistance to Iraqi government and Kurdish forces so they can more effectively wage the fight against ISIL.
Second, at the request of the Iraqi government — we've begun operations to help save Iraqi civilians stranded on the mountain. As ISIL has marched across Iraq, it has waged a ruthless campaign against innocent Iraqis. And these terrorists have been especially barbaric towards religious minorities, including Christian and Yazidis, a small and ancient religious sect. Countless Iraqis have been displaced. And chilling reports describe ISIL militants rounding up families, conducting mass executions, and enslaving Yazidi women.
 note gender specific.  Have they attempted to enslave men?
In recent days, Yazidi women, men and children from the area of Sinjar have fled for their lives. 
note order:  "women, men and children"

And thousands — perhaps tens of thousands — are now hiding high up on the mountain, with little but the clothes on their backs. They're without food, they're without water. People are starving. And children are dying of thirst. Meanwhile, ISIL forces below have called for the systematic destruction of the entire Yazidi people, which would constitute genocide. So these innocent families are faced with a horrible choice: descend the mountain and be slaughtered, or stay and slowly die of thirst and hunger.
I've said before, the United States cannot and should not intervene every time there's a crisis in the world. So let me be clear about why we must act, and act now. When we face a situation like we do on that mountain — with innocent people facing the prospect of violence on a horrific scale, when we have a mandate to help — in this case, a request from the Iraqi government — and when we have the unique capabilities to help avert a massacre, then I believe the United States of America cannot turn a blind eye. We can act, carefully and responsibly, to prevent a potential act of genocide. That's what we're doing on that mountain.
I've, therefore, authorized targeted airstrikes, if necessary, to help forces in Iraq as they fight to break the siege of Mount Sinjar and protect the civilians trapped there. Already, American aircraft have begun conducting humanitarian airdrops of food and water to help these desperate men, women and children survive. Earlier this week, one Iraqi in the area cried to the world, "There is no one coming to help." Well, today, America is coming to help. We're also consulting with other countries — and the United Nations — who have called for action to address this humanitarian crisis.
I know that many of you are rightly concerned about any American military action in Iraq, even limited strikes like these. I understand that. I ran for this office in part to end our war in Iraq and welcome our troops home, and that's what we've done. As commander in chief, I will not allow the United States to be dragged into fighting another war in Iraq. And so even as we support Iraqis as they take the fight to these terrorists, American combat troops will not be returning to fight in Iraq, because there's no American military solution to the larger crisis in Iraq. The only lasting solution is reconciliation among Iraqi communities and stronger Iraqi security forces.
However, we can and should support moderate forces who can bring stability to Iraq. So even as we carry out these two missions, we will continue to pursue a broader strategy that empowers Iraqis to confront this crisis. Iraqi leaders need to come together and forge a new government that represents the legitimate interests of all Iraqis, and that can fight back against the threats like ISIL. Iraqis have named a new president, a new speaker of Parliament, and are seeking consensus on a new prime minister. This is the progress that needs to continue in order to reverse the momentum of the terrorists who prey on Iraq's divisions.
Once Iraq has a new government, the United States will work with it and other countries in the region to provide increased support to deal with this humanitarian crisis and counterterrorism challenge. None of Iraq's neighbors have an interest in this terrible suffering or instability.
And so we'll continue to work with our friends and allies to help refugees get the shelter and food and water they so desperately need, and to help Iraqis push back against ISIL. The several hundred American advisers that I ordered to Iraq will continue to assess what more we can do to help train, advise and support Iraqi forces going forward. And just as I consulted Congress on the decisions I made today, we will continue to do so going forward.
My fellow Americans, the world is confronted by many challenges. And while America has never been able to right every wrong, America has made the world a more secure and prosperous place. And our leadership is necessary to underwrite the global security and prosperity that our children and our grandchildren will depend upon. We do so by adhering to a set of core principles. We do whatever is necessary to protect our people. We support our allies when they're in danger. We lead coalitions of countries to uphold international norms. And we strive to stay true to the fundamental values — the desire to live with basic freedom and dignity — that is common to human beings wherever they are. That's why people all over the world look to the United States of America to lead. And that's why we do it.
So let me close by assuring you that there is no decision that I take more seriously than the use of military force. Over the last several years, we have brought the vast majority of our troops home from Iraq and Afghanistan. And I've been careful to resist calls to turn time and again to our military, because America has other tools in our arsenal than our military. We can also lead with the power of our diplomacy, our economy, and our ideals.
But when the lives of American citizens are at risk, we will take action. That's my responsibility as commander in chief. And when many thousands of innocent civilians are faced with the danger of being wiped out, and we have the capacity to do something about it, we will take action. That is our responsibility as Americans. That's a hallmark of American leadership. That's who we are.
So tonight, we give thanks to our men and women in uniform — especially our brave pilots and crews over Iraq who are protecting our fellow Americans and saving the lives of so many men, women and children that they will never meet. They represent American leadership at its best. As a nation, we should be proud of them, and of our country's enduring commitment to uphold our own security and the dignity of our fellow human beings.
God bless our armed forces, and God bless the United States of America.

12 comments:

Anonymous said...

He's not "Bombing Iraq" he's bombing ISIS mother fuckers and their convoy's...Obama can't do anything right, if he does nothing I am sure you'd be the first to say "why isn't he doing something in IRaq?"

Anonymous said...

| In the impact statement, Leanna Harris writes, "The death of my son is still unreal. Not a moment goes by when I don't think about him or what our future would have held. The amount of grief this has caused is indefinable, it cannot be explained in words or emotions. I now live a tortured existence. I depend on my Lord for strength and guidance." |

(Article goes on to give further excerpts of direct quotes by LC)

http://www.wrcbtv.com/story/26239220/attorney-leanna-harris-not-a-suspect-in-sons-hot-car-death

-TXAnon/ CM

Anonymous said...

^ cont'd-

| Harris, a registered dietitian, said that she had to transfer her job to Alabama, and says her "return to work has been delayed due to the media hounding me."

She writes, "I did lose a consulting job I have had in Alabama for four years due to the media. As of [August 1], I have been out of work 43 days."

Harris goes on to say, "The storm around my family has prevented us from grieving the right way, if there is a right way. Some days I completely break down because I miss my baby and my family so much. August 2 would have been my precious boy's 2nd birthday."

Leanna Harris maintains support of her husband in the impact statement, writing, "Ross was a wonderful father, and he loved Cooper with all of his heart. Because i saw how he treasured our little boy for 22 months, I know without a doubt he could never have knowingly allowed any harm to come to our son. I want you to know what a loving father he was." |

The fact she'd still defend him in light of all the evidence- says plenty!

-TXAnon/ CM

Anonymous said...

(Sorry missed one section between 2 posts)

| In the impact statement, Leanna Harris writes, "Whatever issues that transpired in our marriage is between God and us, for He will judge those moral sins. The rush to judgement by the public and the mainstream media has left me with little confidence in our legal system and our society."

Leanna Harris states that she has received counseling for grief and depression and says, "I have a lot of support from family and friends and my faith in God." |
-CM

Buckley said...

Good evening. Today I authorized two operations in Iraq — targeted airstrikes to protect our American personnel, and a humanitarian effort to help save thousands of Iraqi civilians who are trapped on a mountain without food and water and facing almost certain death. Let me explain the actions we're taking and why.
“I authorized” he is the person with that authority, so “I” is appropriate.
“Let me explain” he is the one speaking, logical first person pronoun

“food”- persuasive device to suggest basic human needs not met; “trapped” is a similarly sensitive word.


First, I said in June — as the terrorist group ISIL began an advance across Iraq

He did say it, so “I” is appropriate

— that the United States would be prepared to take targeted military action in

I would have underlined “United States.” Here, he’s shifting from first to an all inclusive third person. If we ae noting shifts from first to third, he just made one even though “U. S.” is not a pronoun.
Iraq if and when we determined that the situation required it. In recent days,

Here, he shifts to “we”; as he is likely working with military and intelligence personnel, and not doing all the work himself, it is appropriate; this is different from his “authorizing” which comes from him as Commander in Chief.

these terrorists have continued to move across Iraq, and have neared the city of Irbil, where American diplomats and civilians serve at our consulate and American military personnel advise Iraqi forces.
I’m more interested in what he means by “advise” than “military personnel.

To stop the advance on Irbil, I've directed our military to take targeted strikes against ISIL terrorist convoys should they move toward the city. We intend to
Again, (like it or not) he makes the call, but does the work with others. Appropriate shift.

stay vigilant, and take action if these terrorist forces threaten our personnel or facilities anywhere in Iraq, including our consulate in Irbil and our embassy in Baghdad. We're also providing urgent assistance to Iraqi government and

Yes, “assistance” vague like “advise” above. Tell us what that means. “Urgent” makes it even more sensitive. I’d expect they have “urgent” needs; seems awkward with “assistance.”

Buckley said...

Kurdish forces so they can more effectively wage the fight against ISIL.
Second, at the request of the Iraqi government — we've begun operations to help save Iraqi civilians stranded on the mountain. As ISIL has marched across Iraq, it has waged a ruthless campaign against innocent Iraqis. And these terrorists have been especially barbaric towards religious minorities, including Christian and Yazidis, a small and ancient religious sect. Countless Iraqis have been displaced. And chilling reports describe ISIL militants rounding up families, conducting mass executions, and enslaving Yazidi women.
In recent days, Yazidi women, men and children from the area of Sinjar have fled for their lives.


“note order: "women, men and children"
Not sure why order matters here, but noted.

And thousands — perhaps tens of thousands — are now hiding high up on the

“perhaps…” Don’t we know? Sensitive

mountain, with little but the clothes on their backs. They're without food, they're without water. People are starving. And children are dying of thirst. Meanwhile, ISIL forces below have called for the systematic destruction of the entire Yazidi people, which would constitute genocide. So these innocent families are faced with a horrible choice: descend the mountain and be slaughtered, or stay and slowly die of thirst and hunger.
I've said before, the United States cannot and should not intervene every time there's a crisis in the world. So let me beclear about why we must act, and act now. When we face a situation like we do on that mountain — with innocent people facing the prospect of violence on a horrific scale, when we have a mandate to help — in this case, a request from the Iraqi government — and when we have the unique capabilities to help avert a massacre, then I believe the United States of America cannot turn a blind eye. We can act, carefully and responsibly, to prevent a potential act of genocide. That's what we're doing on that mountain.


Here, the shifts from first singular to third or first singular to first plural seem more persuasive and sensitive. The “I” notes his belief and the “we”s are what he wants us to believe. Before this paragraph, the shifts seemed more about what he ordered and what he and the people working with him “we” were doing or going to do. This “we” is trying to persuade us to the same belief that he has.

I've, therefore, authorized targeted airstrikes, if necessary, to help forces in Iraq as they fight to break the siege of Mount Sinjar and protect the civilians trapped there. Already, American aircraft have begun conducting humanitarian airdrops of food and water to help these desperate men, women and children survive. Earlier this week, one Iraqi in the area cried to the world, "There is no one coming to help." Well, today, America is coming to help. We're also consulting with other countries — and the United Nations — who have called for action to address this humanitarian crisis.
I know that many of you are rightly concerned about any American military

“I know…rightly concerned.” Sensitive to criticism.
action in Iraq, even limited strikes like these. I understand that.

Repitition (“I know” “I understand)
Not going through the rest of it, but the “I” and “we” shift continues as he persuades that Americans should be of one mind on the matter. He shifts from “I” in making decsions to “we” should make this decision.

Buckley said...

Do we commenters not have the ability to underline? If we do, what's the code?

Anonymous said...

Snowden says leader pf isis was CIA funded. interview is in Moroccan times. I don't know if that means Isis is still funded by CIA or they got out of control or what. but I know that the people who wanted us to go to war in Iraq never wanted the war to end - so maybe there is more to this than what seems apparent.

Obama sure likes to "sell" the story of people in desparation on a mountain. it may be true -- but he's "selling" it all the same. and it's manipulative, one could just as well tell the story of all the dead american soldiers and braindamaged vets or Iraq watr as reason to hold back.

Buckley said...

http://time.com/2992269/isis-is-an-american-plot-says-iran/

Anonymous said...

Christians are being killed, children are being beheaded. I don't trust Obama at all but something has to be done.

Verbal Kint said...

Can it be a true SA for President Obama when he didn't write the speech?

Peter Hyatt said...
This comment has been removed by the author.