Friday, January 1, 2016

Top Five Analyzed News Stories

What were the most popular cases analyzed in 2015?  Judging by numbers, there may be some surprises.  


The Top Five Cases by page views:


5.   Bill Cosby 

This was initially a story that interested readers and analysis done on a single victim's statement showed that she told the truth, and spoke from experiential memory.  

After this,  a cascade of allegations came forward people lost interest in the analysis as sexual abuse, rape and assault cases are complex, and there is a strong bias towards cases that have a simple, "Is he lying or not?" element to them.  

What is most interesting to analysts is not what is most interesting to the general population of readers, most of whom are interested in both crime and language.  


4.  Timothy Madden case. 

This had many page views, but less comments.  This may be due to the lack of mystery.  

This next one surprised me:  


3.   Lonzie Barton:  http://statement-analysis.blogspot.com/2015/08/missing-toddler-lonzie-barton.html

This was heavily read, though also less comments.  It may have been one in which people felt satisfaction in learning.  


2.  DeOrr 

This case produced a great deal of page views, as well as many comments.  As more information came out, interest increased with most people appear settled with this:

DeOrr met death by unintended cause and the parents entered into a panic cover-up.  

This case produced very strong opinions that showed low confidence in law enforcement. 


1.  The Murder of Amanda Blackburn produced the most page views as well as the most comments.  This case surpassed the Hailey Dunn case in the need for deleting comments.  Initially, the comments were focused upon analysis, but later became filled with personal drama, projection and of late, comments where confidence in law enforcement appears low.  

The single most viewed article was the "Davey Blackburn Transcript" analysis.  

In judging comments, most people are suspicious of the husband due to:

a.  The extreme coincidental nature of the case
b.  His language 
c.  His behavior 

It appears that most people actually feel that he is both hiding background of a sexual nature, and that he may have orchestrated, in the least, the break in, or opportunity, for the crime.  The doubts regarding law enforcement appear mixed; with some recognizing how difficult it would be to find a connection, while others continue to show a nation wide crisis in confidence in both law enforcement and in jury deliberation; since the Casey Anthony verdict.  

The coincidental nature of the case appears to be overwhelming and what is both the strongest opinion from those in law enforcement watching the case, and the cause of the lack of confidence in the actual investigators.  

The comments about Blackburn's intellect, particular, fascinate me, as these differ, almost on a straight 1:1 basis, with the opinions of law enforcement professionals who see him as a strong intellect who would need a very well trained interrogator with a good understanding of Scripture.  The professionals see him as ranging from "above average" to "well above average" intellectually, while comments, particularly those with embittered feelings towards religion, see him in a lower bracket.  


Cases that came close 

The rash of "Fake Hate" stories were popular, including

"Relentlessly Gay" where the hatred was aimed at both Gays and Christians by a thief who had raised $43,000 before having to close Go Fund Me account.  This was the simplest "anonymous author identity" case I have ever seen and even those with little experience in analysis saw the patterns.  Deeper analysis showed a very disturbed narcissist with deep hatred of Christianity, and contempt for the public at large, including the gay community, of whom she sought to exploit their hatred of Christianity.  This was very successful to the point where some even posted that she could keep their donation, even though it was a fraud as they could not conceal their hatred of Christianity. 

Julie Baker  faced many years in prison and could not keep a single penny.  She even allowed us to see that her own children were following in her criminal footsteps.  

Overall:  

Fake racism and the fake social justice warrior stories were all popular.  

Readers have a strong grasp that social justice warriors will find or create an occurrence to fulfill their 'mission' or purpose in life.  The comments show, mostly, that readers grasp the 'social justice warrior's' psychological need for relevancy, and how they must encounter a scenario to affirm their own worth.  

False allegation of rape was popular, and readers seemed to express a strong grasp of what a real rape victim sounds like, referring to Cosby's victim.  I have not found 'backlash' either against victims nor against analysis.   Readers seem to have a very strong grasp on:

"this is about truth" above all else, including politics.  

This leads me to a fascinating liar who provides me with helpful research via commenting:  

Hillary Clinton was the most generous donator of deception, as she shows not only a pathological pattern of lying but a disconnect between herself and the population, or herself and the 'rules' in life.  

Her language shows an elitism that she is incapable of masquerading, even when she uses a fake accent. While many, if not most, politicians (like actors) have strong disconnect between reality and their own lives, Hillary actually appears not only aware of it, but without the ability to counter it with substance  

 Hillary's contempt of the population was consistently noted by readers, and her statements produced the largest number of "passive aggressive" comments; those which bristle at Clinton being exposed as deceptive, but seek to conceal the resentment.  These are valuable for research.  

Making A Murderer is popular, in terms of page views, but is new to the blog, and has introduced, for the first time since Jonbenet Ramsey murder, larger scale disagreement.  This is good for analysis, though the analysis itself is not challenging. 

 Perhaps that the analysis was not challenging, itself, a positive, since it further highlights the impact of the documentary's propaganda techniques of appealing to emotion, versus Statement Analysis science which appeals more to intellect.

It has not produced Statement Analysis debate, which is interesting, regarding principle, but emotional responses.  I almost wish that there were more conflicting or difficult to discern statements that would have led to some discussion on principle, but Steven Avery is not a skilled liar.  

Hailey Dunn and Jonbenet are two victims that always bring interest.  

What is so interesting about linking these two victims is this:

In Hailey Dunn case we had a mother who could not be stopped from talking, while in the Jonbenet case, we had parents who said as little as possible.  

Both sides were and are deceptive.  

In a recent 'testing' of analysts, they had no problem with the Patsy Ramsey 911 call showing that the language was scripted (rehearse), how uncomfortable she was moving from it, and how she gave linguistic indicator that the child was dead, at the time of the call. 

Also of fascination in this case is the comments which say in effect, 'I don't think the parents were guilty but I don't have anything to back this up.'

Regarding Hailey Dunn, 

the mother, Billie Jean Dunn, has actually not only helped 'solve' the case, though it is not adjudicated, but has given a very large and valuable sample of language for analysis used in training.  

Lastly, cases that fascinated me, but did not garner interest:

Islamic supremacy.  

The use of propaganda in Europe and the United States, the deliberate fabrication of statistics, reports and the suppression of ideological truth did not catch the attention of readers according to the numbers.  The lack of interest even in the Swedish rape epidemic surprised me but the recent Islamic terrorism in California did not show high interest, either.  This may be due to the lack of mystery.  

Readers did not show much numerical interest in the federal government's removal of "Islam" from "Islamic terror", nor the dhimmitude posture that has steadily increased in the last 7 years.  Some chalked this up to partisan politics, which surprised me.  

What does this suggest?

It may be that the lack of actual 'lie detection' necessary is the source of apathy, as they can read of the murders anywhere.  Or, the apathy could be much worse:

As one person noted, "IRAN gets the bomb?  Well, I pay $2 a gallon for gas."


What did catch interest for some was the Islamic teaching of using deception and the psychology behind supremacy ideology and how it leads to conflict and violence in general. 

The Cosby saga was one in which initial interest, by the numbers, was very high, but latter stories showed little interest.  This may be explained as "Cosby fatigue" due to the overwhelming number of accusations; there was no way we were going to have 50 statements analyzed.  


Politicians 

Politicians' lies bring interesting reactions.  

"The analysis is wrong because it is one sided."

"If Peter does not analyze Donald Trump, I know he is biased" to 
"Peter only analyzes ______"

How about the goofy, "Statement Analysis only works with middle class educated people"?  

I wouldn't put my signature on this one, either.  

The desperation to defend a partisan opinion leads to the most interesting passive aggressive comments, but the concerning area for me is the apathy. 

"All politicians lie."  

My hope is that honest people are, over time, recognizing the danger of a liar and how the liar has been in training his or her entire life, and how, when push comes to shove, the liar will protect himself no matter the cost to others.

Human nature, itself, is complex, and the pattern that is evident is the exact opposite of what people expect:

They think that a person who tells lots of lies would, when the big test comes, the hand is on the Bible, and a person's entire life is at stake, will come clean and tell the truth. 

The opposite is what is consistent with human nature.  

The lie told under oath, when the big test has come, is the result of all the small lies told over decades.  

The hope of "now" the liar will come clean comes from old Hollywood "feel good" movies where the movie concludes with right.  

My hope remains, and has been realized, especially in working with businesses, that discernment of liars saves them money, time, and stress. 

The companies do experience loss, which is regrettable, but the smart ones learn the lesson.  True, some need more than a few losses before they finally understand how dangerous the liar really is, but when they do get it, they take preventive measures and have brighter days ahead.  


Blade Runner

At first, Oscar Pitorius caught much interest, he was seen as deceptive, and interest dropped.  This pattern was also seen in 2015 with:  

Jodi Arias was at first interesting by number, but once analyzed, readers cared less about her lies as her guilt was seen.  Even her sexual detail and appearance gave a 'yawn' by those more interested in lie detection than the drama.  Only Casey Anthony was capable of holding interest in drama, which may have been due to the boldness and incessant nature of her lies, and the lies of her attorneys.  

Amanda Knox still had some interest in 2015, with most people believing that she was present for the murder of her roommate, and although it has been a long time, the former FBI analyst's article still brings both traffic and ridicule.   It remains a good example of emotional obsession leading to extreme "need to persuade", including techniques of boasting of self, and ridiculing those who disagreed.  Moore's article did impact readers' opinion with those who came away from the article with new doubts:  they thought she was railroaded by Italian justice, read Moore's bizarre defense, and came away open to analysis which showed clear knowledge of a sexual homicide.  

Comments

Comments are helpful and useful in analysis.  They reveal who we are, and even those who post anonymously are able to be seen, at times, when they 'respond and agree' with their own comments, under another name.  

The level of honesty fascinates me and fascinates analysts.  

People of all stripes post.  

Those in the stories sometimes post.  

Anonymous posting is critical, as it even allows those who wish to opine, but cannot for obvious reasons (and not so obvious) may do so.  

Comments are analyzed for truth and deception. 

Patterns emerge. 

I especially enjoy the honest ones which disagree with the analysis, and state so, even saying, "I have nothing to stand upon!", which is actually to reveal honest self-awareness.  This person is asking for help. 

I enjoy those who love good but civic debate. 

I find pedantic lectures interesting and revealing.  

The passive aggressive comments are the ones I use in instruction as they are the most fascinating and the most educational.   These are the most predictable, but the ones that are most useful to compare to others. 

I have tipped my hat to those who have understood certain statements of my own in which I deliberately made, to be analyzed.  

This can be impressive. 

Comments come from all stripes, including professionals, and come from many different countries. 

Comments are educational. 

I often find new angles to add to my analysis.  

I am forever learning more about human nature from the comments.  

I am able to measure comments by length, abbreviations, and gauge emotions versus intellect.  

They are valuable insights into human nature and affirm so much about analysis principles. 

The analysis posted is challenged by professionals all over the world. 

This scrutiny is invaluable.  







109 comments:

rjb said...

Thank you, Peter, for everything you do here. I came to the site because of my interest in the Amanda Blackburn car, and was instantly hooked. For the first time in a long time I have found, in Statement Analysis, something that sparks my desire to study and learn.

Happy New Year!

tania cadogan said...

Happy new year one and all.

rjb said...

*case, not car. Autocorrect is my arch-nemesis.

Boston Lady said...

This article was excellent as it gave analysis to the analysis. I've learned so much from this blog and it continues to challenge my perception of what I see and read and interpret. It has also opened my eyes to a few family members who employ manipulation and lies. It has been a challenge and struggle for me to accept the lies because I have been fooled but also because I don't want it to be true. It means a very different interaction now. Family events are different. Anyway! I enjoy learning and growing and reading different comments. I'm looking forward to another year. Happy new year everyone !

kimisan03 said...

I didn't post on any of the Islamic supremacy articles or analyses, but I did bring up the Swedish rape epidemic in a conversation last week and used your blog to make some good points. I listen even when I don't comment, and I usually don't comment because I don't want to say anything foolish. Everyone here could see right through me! Happy New Year, Peter!

Anonymous said...

It was the Blackburn thing that got me here (I'm new). I quickly became fascinated with Statement Analysis, and early on I was stunned by some SA that revealed some very important aspects of my own psyche that were previously always hidden from me! The consciousness-raising / increasing self-awareness I experience on this website are of great value to me. It would be hard to put a price tag on it! Some of that increased self-awareness has been painful, but I'm GLAD to shine light in any dark corners of myself! Studying and learning here helps me understand others too (which helps me better understand myself). It's nice to know the owner of this blog says he appreciates and learns from our comments! That shows he has a passion for learning (a life-long process), which makes me so glad I found this place!

GeekRad said...

I love the recap.Thank you.

Trigger said...

I keep reading this blog because I like it.

It is refreshing to know that other people are interested in statement analysis as an indicator of deception by looking at what a person says and the way they say it.

It is faster than a poly.

Anonymous said...

#2 - DeOrr Kunz Jr.

New statement from Jessica Mitchell on Dec. 30, 2015...

"Happy Birthday baby DeOrr mommy and day love and miss you dearly," Jessica Mitchell said in a written statement.

"Our family is in mourning and we ask the community for prayers for our son DeOrr Jay Kunz Jr. We ask the community to pray for answers as the police and private investigators do their jobs. We ask the community to pray for strength as the answers begin to come in. We would like to thank each of you for your prayers and support during this horrific time," Mitchell said in a written statement.

Source... http://www.localnews8.com/news/candlelight-service-held-for-birthday-of-missing-toddler-deorr-kunz-jr/37200908

Sloane Berrie said...

Hi Peter, thank you for your analysis and this blog. I learn so much.

I want to ask you if you would please do ststement analysis on the foster parents of William Terryll. William is a three year old boy at the time he went missing from his grandmother's house. The bio family is not involved. However, from the little I know from statement analysis, I feel uncomfortable with the foster mother's language.

I have transcripts ready if you would please let me know whether you are willing to look at it.

This case is playing off in Sydney, Australia.

The police indicated that they have NOTHING to go on. Like in the Amanda Blackburn case, a percentage of the public frown upon the foster family.

PLEASE Peter, please say you will look into it.

Thank you and I hope you will let me know.

Anonymous said...

I got Chinese take-out tonight. I just opened my fortune cookie. The message in red ink on the small white paper inside cookie says this: "Great thoughts come from the heart." Also, here's the rest printed in red ink on the tiny paper: "Lucky # 18, 71, 4, 16, 49, 51" Finally, last thing printed in red ink on tiny slip of paper from fortune cookie: "Learn Chinese: Dictation, ting-xie"

OldPsychNurse said...

Thank you, Peter, for teaching me and others about SA. I hope 2016 is filled with many blessings for you.

John mcgowan said...

Anonymous Anonymous said...
#2 - DeOrr Kunz Jr.

New statement from Jessica Mitchell on Dec. 30, 2015...

"Happy Birthday baby DeOrr mommy and day love and miss you dearly," Jessica Mitchell said in a written statement.

"Our family is in mourning and we ask the community for prayers for our son DeOrr Jay Kunz Jr. We ask the community to pray for answers as the police and private investigators do their jobs. We ask the community to pray for strength as the answers begin to come in. We would like to thank each of you for your prayers and support during this horrific time," Mitchell said in a written statement.

Source... http://www.localnews8.com/news/candlelight-service-held-for-birthday-of-missing-toddler-deorr-kunz-jr/37200908

Please note the order:

"mourning

"Prayers"

"Answers"

"We ask the community to pray for strength"


""Our family is in mourning"


This is not good. "Mourning" is associated with death. Given the passage of time they may feel he is dead, however. Parents will cling onto any hope that their child is still alive. Even to the point were they are told he/she is found dead.

"Answers"

"The answers"

What "answers" do they want? Do they want to know whom has him? (considering they said he was abducted) Is he being looked after? Is he being loved. Is he being fed? Is he warm, etc etc..If they don't say, we are not allowed to say it for them.


"We ask the community to pray for strength"

To whom is the Strength" for?. Strength for DEorr, the family, strength for the community.

In this statement there is no concern for Deorrs safety, health, welfare. There is no plea for his safe return.

Hey Jude said...

A great read, thank you, Peter - it's good of you to take the time to give that type of feedback, especially on the comments.

'The level of honesty fascinates me and fascinates analysts.'

That's most diplomatic, taking your preceding observation into account. :) (I would've said the level of dishonesty was fascinating or equally fascinating.)

I find it interesting, too, that some people have multiple identities, conduct conversations with themselves, or will sometimes respond to their own posts as anon, but I also find it annoying - strangely transparent a times, too. I think 'insecure people who crave respect'.

---

I've been following the William Tyrell case, too - an analysis would be welcomed by half of Australia, I reckon.

Anonymous said...

Readers did not show much numerical interest in the federal government's removal of "Islam" from "Islamic terror", nor the dhimmitude posture that has steadily increased in the last 7 years. Some chalked this up to partisan politics, which surprised me.

What does this suggest?
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

It could suggest they fear politicians more than terrorists as they've been groomed to do so over the years.

Sloganism takes over: 'We Will Remember', 'Never Forget'

Much easier to swallow than ever imagining the same could happen again (and again, and again). Just kill the messenger and our ears will feel better.

I don't like the posts either, and I've seen more of it than many on here posting who like the drama of the missing or hoping to find someone to hop on and torment for 'study' or other personal reasons.

It's unnerving to stare truth down when it's easier to grab the remote control and slip off into never land.

ima.grandma said...

http://www.wfaa.com/story/news/local/2016/01/01/dpd-no-evidence-of-foul-play-in-womans-disappearance/78180070/

Uh-oh... Our words give us away every time. I suspect we will hear more...

snipped:
Faustino Valdez, her boyfriend of six years, was the last to see her Tuesday morning at the home the couple shared on Aurora Avenue.

He told News 8 that she got up just like it was any other regular day.

"She … took a shower, got ready and put her clothes on -- her work uniform -- her makeup just like a normal day," he said. "(She) gave me a kiss goodbye and she just got up and just left to work."

Valdez added, "It's not like her to just do this -- leave the kids like that."

Anonymous said...

...left TO work?"

I would have expected left FOR work. Or at least, left to go to work.

Anonymous said...

Maybe he meant to say "went to work." Not sure why he said "left to work".

"...just like a normal day."

"...took a shower, got ready, and put her clothes on."

John mcgowan said...

ima.grandma

That short statement is loaded with red flags.

At first glance.


"took a shower"

When "water", in any form, enters a statement, we should be on alert for the possibility of sexual abuse.

"got ready and put her clothes on -- her work uniform -- her makeup

This is unnecessary information, making it doubly important for the analyst. For her to go to work she would have to put her clothes on. Will she be found without any clothes on?

"just like a normal day,"

Indicating that this day was anything but normal" It is used in story telling.

"(She) gave me a kiss goodbye and she just got up and just left to work"

""(She) gave me a kiss goodbye"

This is to portray that the relation at the time was good.

"Just" is used to compare or minimize. What is he comparing it to? It is also used when something has "Just" happened. I "just" got a call, 2mins ago

""(She) gave me a kiss goodbye"

"Goodbye"

Within a statement, we note the inclusion of "Goodbye", often with a term of endearment.
This often points to a time of death.

"left to work"

We highlight the word "left in a statement as highly sensitive.

When it is used as a connecting verb, connecting one place to another, there’s always a missing story. She has to "leave" to go to work. What happened before she "left" This accompanied with the word "goodbye" is a strong possibility that something nefarious happened at that time.

Anonymous said...

sounds like he is jealous of someone she works with, alongside, or is in the place of her employment often.

Anonymous said...

Watched the video. He stutters on the kiss and can't finish the interview.

What did he do to her?

Hood up. SUV parked in apt complex.

Maybe it happened in the middle of the night?

Anonymous said...

This would be a great story to cover considering the weather related issues in the area at the time of her disappearance. Odd that under such grief, this man would act in such a manner.

Anonymous said...

To anon 10:02: Woah! I watched the video - you're right - he can't SAY it!! "...I ki - ki - ..." He's stuttering!!

Anonymous said...

The back of the SUV appears to have been bumped by something. Maybe a boat, or backed into something prior, or a trailer hitch jumping and scooting up.
Her purse in the car at an apt complex? Surprised it hadn't been broke into before it was found.

Anonymous said...

I ran across this link while Googling the above (counselor sexually assaults):

http://www.kens5.com/videos/news/3639556050001/4682640030001/

GeekRad said...

I love this site. It has taught me valuable tools for hiring and supervision of employees. And more importantly, when management is being deceptive which helps me to prepare for the shoe to drop. Sometimes I have to be that deceptive manager withholding information until an announcement so this site has helped me to choose my words carefully.

Anonymous said...

"The lack of interest even in the Swedish rape epidemic surprised me"

I tried talking to my mom about it (she's an American-born Swede). She became angry with me, and told me that the story is not true. She said it's a bunch of lies.

A few days later, she told me she had done some research, and she said "I have to take back what I said to you. I found out what you said about Sweden was true."

Sus said...

Thank you, Peter, for all you do. You're running a business, yet you take time for us amateurs. This blog is a part of my daily life. It stretches my mind.

It freaks me out a bit that you analyze our comments, though you've said it many times. Its just rather scary to think someone knows you by your words. That's my own problem.

As for Islam, I have much to say. At first I didn't feel I was qualified, but I've been reading and studying. I may join in the discussion next post and see if it stays posted. :-)

ima.grandma said...

I agree John. I was skimming and came upon the small sample and felt the need to post. Even with this: "It's not like her to just do this -- leave the kids like that." I sense the beginning of victim blaming. If this saga continues, our group will have much to discuss. As always, I enjoy hearing from you.

trustmeigetit said...

Just read an article that is clearing just another attempt to create racism where there is none. I mean these men were not bad, it's just a big conspiracy to bring the black man down? Really?

See below


Comedian Eddie Griffin lashed out at accusers of Bill Cosby and suggested there was a conspiracy in the U.S. to topple African-American cultural icons in a video interview published Wednesday on the hip-hop tabloid website VladTV.

When asked about the slew of women who have alleged sexual misconduct, including drugging and assault, at the hands of the now 78-year-old comedian, Griffin said, "There is a systematic effort to destroy every black male entertainer's image. They want us all to have an asterisk by our name."

He went on to reference the 2003 rape allegations against Kobe Bryant, child molestation accusations against the late pop star Michael Jackson and reports of excessive gambling regarding retired NBA star Michael Jordan as examples.

Sus said...

Trust me,
Griffen has that backward. If he forces us to label, then so be it, I will. The four examples he lists were men who were scorned in black society for their views, and looked highly upon in white society. All four were called "Uncle Toms" at one time or another in their careers for their views.

Hey Jude said...

Some William Tyrell links, just in case Peter might consider looking at it, and for anyone's interest. I can't find any transcripts and have not listened to the '60 Minutes' interview yet - I'll make and post a '60 Minute' transcript some time next week if the case is of interest here. I think it's interesting, as William is a foster child and I wonder if or how that might impact and be reflected in the language. Another plus, the parents can't be legally identified, so it would have to be less guilt inducing for those who sometimes regret posting negative comments.

--

Where's William? Website
'The Where’s William? Campaign is the initiative of William’s family working in partnership with Bravehearts Inc. and endorsed by NSW Police and Crime Stoppers.'

http://www.whereswilliam.org

Video excerpt from interview: Audio excerpt from 'Little Boy Lost' :William's mother's 000 call:
http://www.news.com.au/entertainment/tv/william-tyrells-famil-speak-about-their-unbearable-grief-at-losing-their-little-boy/news-story/c0ba693e4df8317cd0dc089761d6192e


More 'Little Boy Lost' audio

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/nsw/william-tyrrells-parents-tell-of-their-never-ending-pain-12-months-after-the-three-year-old-vanished/story-fni0cx12-1227522704458


'60 Minutes' Complete Interview (this one won't load for me)
http://www.9jumpin.com.au/show/60minutes/stories/2015/september/where-is-william/

Alternatively:
'60 Minutes' Interview with William's parents - three videos:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=KZ9ym2DUu-4
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=fPaFeIXLGOs
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=HxxLQ_K5ljY

Hey Jude said...

Didn't intend to bold my comment, just the link headings, sorry. :-/

Anonymous said...

Peter and SA are right about Steven Avery prosecutor having personal issues of a sexual nature.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/ex-da-ken-kratzs-law-license-suspended-in-sexting-scandal/

KM

Hey Jude said...

That Kratz guy has no shame. How is he even still in circulation? I don't understand how he hasn't self-banished.

Sloane Berrie said...

Hi Peter,

If you have time PLEASE do SA on this transcript. William Tyrrell disappeared from his grandma's house. The police say they have no clue where to go. All pedo's in the area seem to be not involved, unless they are to clever for the police.

The foster parents are under discussion since the disappearance.

Can you please please look at this, even if it is just a few sentences.

Those that have learned from SA, please you can also read and see if you could shed light.

Peter, if you want me to pay a fee, I will see if I can.

Thank you and hope to hear from you.

READ THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT BELOW:
KEY:

P = Police
D = Dad
M = Mum

P: Guys, this remains a high profile case, and it’s fair to say everyone’s feeling for you at the moment. But they can’t walk a mile in your shoes, because it’s not happening to them. In your words, how horrendous has this process been?


M: I don’t think there are words. It just, it’s the never ending nightmare. We wake up…we just relive it. I just can’t believe it’s happened. We just don’t have our boy, we just…we have no idea where he is, we don’t know who’s got him, we don’t know what’s happening to him, we know nothing about it - we just want it to be over.



P: That’s part of the battle isn’t it, one minute he’s there, next minute he’s vanished?


D: Yeah.


M: Yeah, it’s surreal…I’m living somebody’s else’s world, I’m in somebody else’s life.


D: It is like living a nightmare.


M: You wake up and it’s just, it’s just always here. You go about your normal day, it’s just always there. It’s never away from you, it’s constant.



P: Because you can’t extinguish that love for your boy, you’re caring parents - you’re wondering is he okay?


M: Never, never. And I have to watch, we have to watch his sister learn to play, and learn to be an only child, it’s heartbreaking.


Sloane Berrie said...

PART 2

P: When did you guys last see him?


M: That morning, on the 12th at Mum’s place.


D: About 10.15am.



P: Can you give a bit of background, what was he doing?


M: We’d gone up to visit Mum and Dad, well Mum because Dad had passed away, I keep calling it Mum and Dad’s, we’d gone to visit, it was a surprise visit.


D: We left early.


M: We left early the night before, surprised them [the kids], surprised Nanna.



P: Can you tell us what William was doing at his Nanna’s place?


M: He was playing, he was having fun, he was in his Spiderman outfit playing Daddy Tiger, I mean, it was fun, it was just normal.


D: He was doing what he would normally do.



P: And it was a surprise visit to Nanna’s?


M: Yeah we’d actually planned to go on the Friday, but we ended up the Thursday, leaving earlier, and it was a surprise for Mum and it was a surprise for the kids to go before, because they love going to Nanna’s, yeah it was a complete surprise.



P: So the kids had no idea either?


M: None, none, they were over the moon, we told them in the car once we picked them up.


D: They were excited.


M: And they were screaming with delight, because we get to do something special, which is stop at McDonalds on the way which we don’t normally do. It was just an adventure, a family going to see family.
P: And when you arrived the kids no doubt jumped out of the car and raced to see Nanna?


M: Yeah.


D: Absolutely, it’s just as exciting for Nanna as it was for the kids, she loves seeing the kids.



P: When did things start to go awry?


M: Well, when I realised that William was missing, I just, I think back to that moment where I just went, I can’t hear him, why, why can’t I hear him, and I walked around, seriously it was just 2, 3 metres away from where we were sitting, and I’ve just walked out, and I just see nothing. I see nothing, I hear nothing, I’m speechless. I’m walking around in a circle on the spot thinking, where is he, why can’t I see him, and I’m yelling out, “William, where are you, you need to talk to Mummy, tell me where you are, I can’t see you, I can’t hear you, where are you?”, and he was nowhere, and I’m just standing there thinking, how could he just disappear because he just disappeared and I don’t get it, I don’t get it.



P: Did you think initially that oh, kids being kids, he’s in a Spiderman uniform, he’s probably just climbing trees?


M: No it’s not William, it’s not William, he doesn’t do that. On that morning, before he went missing, I’d put him in a tree because Mum’s got some good climbing trees, and he was in it, and he said, “No Mummy it’s too high, get me down,” and I said to him “Why, why don’t you try?”, and he said “No Mummy too high, get me down,” so he wouldn’t be in a tree, it’s not in him.



P: So he’d pick a spot to play in and stay there?


D: Yeah he’d stay within distance knowing how far away he was from us at any given point in time.


M: Yeah, yeah, he always had us in earshot or eyesight.


D: Or he’d do the check in, he’d come back around from the corner or checking out a spot, and come and just check how far away he was from you, just do the check in.


M: He’s not a wanderer, not a child to run away. He’s got a really good sense of adventure, but he’s got a really good understanding of his limitations. He’s not a kid that would just run into something, he would stop and think, he would consider what he would do before he’d do anything else.

Sloane Berrie said...

PART 3

P: Not spontaneous?


M: Oh he’s spontaneous in terms of humour, and fun.



P: So in that case, when you’ve looked around the grounds for him and couldn’t find him, you would have thought, something’s not right here?


M: I thought that immediately, I had a vision in my head, I don’t know why, but I had a vision in my head – somebody - I can’t explain it, somebody reached over and I sort of feel like they’ve gone “clump” on his shoulders, picked him up and moved him on because to me that’s the only way, the only way I can explain for him not to be there. I don’t get it, I don’t - how can a little boy, how can a 3-year-old boy just vanish [clicks fingers] into nothing? Because that’s exactly what it was like.



P: I think it’s fair to say the community has asked that very question, particularly on a semi-rural property, kids don’t just disappear.


M: No they don’t, they don’t. My brothers have brought their kids up around there, they would run those streets with absolutely no fear. Every other house on that street with kids, those kids are on that street with absolutely no fear. There’s no reason for them not to be safe at Nanna’s house.



P: So you raised the alarm immediately?


M: Well I raced around for a bit, then went down and got the neighbour to help, then D came back, because he had a meeting.


D: I had a meeting and I arrived back and there was a bit of confusion if William was with me, because he’s always looking out for me and my car, and I was on my way back, and I’d arrived back and been asked if William was with me and I said no, then I immediately got out of the car and started looking around, and within 5 minutes we raised the alarm and I think I ran the perimeter of the whole street within about 10-15 minutes, and I mean, he wouldn’t, he’s not a wanderer, he wouldn’t even cross the street by himself. He wouldn’t go far.

P: Parents know their own kids, don’t they.


M: He wouldn’t do it, he just wouldn’t do it, it’s not in him, even if somebody was to entice him across the road he wouldn’t do it, he’d run back, it’s just not in his character to go blindly with people. Every mother says that about their child and I realise that kids can be tempted, I understand that completely. William’s personality was, “I’m interested but I‘m cautious”, like he didn’t trust freely. I can’t see him doing it.


Sloane Berrie said...

PART 4

D: He was cautious, he’d cower away as little children would normally do, but he had this instinct about him about doing the right and wrong thing.



P: It’s a tough question, but when did you first suspect abduction?

M: In my mind it was immediate, because there was no way in the world William would have gone into that bush, it’s too thick, there’s lantana all through it. There is no way in the world he would have gone into that bush.



P: Being a cautious boy he would have thought twice?


M: It was in my head and even Mum, while I was talking with Mum while we were waiting and I was doing the frantic thing and running through the house and opening up cupboards and all sorts of stuff, I just kept going through my head, somebody’s taken him, I can’t, in my mind it was the only logical explanation for what could have happened.


D: A child in that situation, in that circumstance, in those surrounds would not just disappear into thin air. I mean I had my doubts, I did not know what to believe at the time, especially the first hour or two I didn’t know what to believe but I guess my mind was wondering as to what could have happened to him. I just had to keep on going and have the support of the community around us that were also looking for him. The police were on the scene within minutes, which was absolutely fantastic, but I didn’t know what to believe.


M: But in that community, you don’t expect somebody to take a child. I mean seriously, it’s a tiny community, everybody knows each other around those streets, there’s complete trust. I’m astounded that there could be somebody living there or people living there that could do this, it’s just not the place. You’d expect abductions in the city, you don’t expect to hear about abductions out here in Kendall, I mean it’s just ridiculous.



P: Parents are extra cautious in Sydney, but you’d probably let your guard down and be a bit disarmed in a quiet neck of the woods like that. Do you feel betrayed that someone within that community has potentially kidnapped a child?


M: I don’t think it’s somebody from the community. I think it’s somebody who doesn’t have a history there, I think it’s…If, I mean I don’t know for sure. I can’t see, I can’t see a true local who knows my Mum, who knows us, and knows our family, choosing to take our child. I can’t see that, and if that’s the case, then I feel so sorry for that community, because that is absolutely disgraceful and nobody can trust a soul. That’s not the community of Kendall, people trust each other there.



P: Dad, do you feel the same way?


D: Absolutely, I think the community is probably going through just a tough a time as we are because there are so many families there with young children who have now changed their lives as well, and the impact that’s had on them, for I don’t know what period of time but it’s disgraceful.



Sloane Berrie said...

PART 5

P: I’d like to have a chat about William himself, because he’s such a vibrant kid, every parent like myself has seen that photo of him in the Spiderman outfit and it just tears at the heartstrings, like you not knowing, what do you see when you look at that photo?


M: I took the photo, I took three photos, I do photo books, of what we do as a family every year. So every time we go somewhere I have my camera and I just take pictures of what they’re doing, and I thought Mum’s getting old, be really good for William and his sister to have memories of being at Mum’s. And my Dad passed away in February that year so that was really the first time we’d been back since Dad passed away, and we were going to go visit Dad’s grave, they were drawing some pictures to put on his grave, they were sending messages to Opa and things like that. I just thought, I want to just take some pictures of that.

So I look at that picture and I remember what we were doing and why we were doing it. I remember William just being absolutely beside himself with happiness at being at Nanna’s house, I remember the discussion with William about putting on his Spiderman clothes because I wanted him to wear a singlet, he didn’t want to wear a singlet, so the compromise was he’d wear a Spiderman t-shirt underneath his Spiderman clothes, so he was Spidermanned out, completely.


All these little things that I just remember, it was just, a normal family, doing normal family things, with their grandmother. D had an appointment which is not unusual, he works remotely. We were going to wait for him to come home and then we were going to go and visit Dad’s grave, then we were going to go out, so we’d planned the day. And I look at that picture and I just think, minutes, minutes, and our world has changed. His sister no longer has a brother, we no longer have a son, we no longer have a child, we no longer have our boy. My Mum is coping with her own grief because it happened at her house, it’s just awful.



P: She can’t blame herself.


M: No she doesn’t, well I hope she doesn’t, no she can’t.



Sloane Berrie said...

PART 6

P: What sort of boy is William?


D: He’s vibrant, the cheeky, vibrant little boy, but you know, full of energy, but loves interacting with his sister, he loved interacting with us. I mean he’s my little boy, I mean when I see that photo it just brings me to tears.



P: They’re pretty cheeky at that age.


D: Very cheeky, but also they’ve got that love you know, and, the father and boy love that, he had, it was just…


M: He adored his dad, just absolutely, his eyes and there was a smile. I look back at some of the pictures, and I look at pictures where William was smiling for me, and I was looking at pictures where William was smiling for his Dad, and it’s different.



P: Daddy’s little boy?


M: Completely, they adored each other, absolutely adored each other, and it’s heartbreaking.



P: What were his likes? What did he like to do?


D: Anything that related to Spiderman, he loved Spiderman, he loved planes, and we’d even taken him to the airport and watched the planes take off and land, you know, I guess they pick up on the things that you like as well, but anything relating to Spiderman and superheros and those sorts of things, he loved.


M: We’d got him a bike for his birthday, so we’d all go bike riding together, and he was just in heaven. He was just…We’ve got pictures of William riding this bike, and there is just unbridled joy, just over his face, he was just free, and he was really good. Just racing, just wanted to get on that bike and just ride it.

P: What do you think has happened to William?


D: It’s a hard question. I think if I can answer it by saying, I’d trod those grounds myself for three or four days, every morning until almost nightfall, we had Pol Air, we had police, we had SES, we had the community, if he was out there in the bush, he would have been found, which you know, as I was walking through the bush with other people, it became more aware to me as time went on that this is not a normal event. This is not a child gone missing in the bush, this is heading down the path of abduction or something more sinister. That’s what I believe, what I truly believe now, and I still pray to this day that he’s alive.



P: You can’t give up hope can you? You read about those cases in America where 10 years on, they’re rescued.


M: If somebody has him, and if he is alive, I…I, want him to be safe, I want him to be feeling loved, and I want someone to be looking after him. Because to imagine that something else is going on, we can’t live a life like that, we need to know where he is, and we need to know what happened to him. We can’t live forever like this, his sister can’t grow up never knowing what happened to her brother.



P: If someone does have him, what message would you have for them right now?


M: Just give him back.


D: Do the right thing, drop him off.


M: Give him back, take him to a church, take him to a police station, take him to a school, give him to someone, give him back.



P: In the same vein, if someone knows something, what would you say to them if they haven’t come forward, for some reason, if they’re scared?


D: It’s time to do something, it’s time to say something.


M: There are too many people whose hearts are breaking here. If you don’t care about us, care about William’s sister, care about his family, care about the people who have to grow up with this, never knowing. He has a sister that’s going to be permanently identified as someone who is the sister of a little boy who is missing. That’s not fair, that’s not fair, think about the children, it’s you know, it doesn’t have to be about us, it’s about the children and it’s about William.

Sloane Berrie said...

PART 7

D: And it doesn’t have to end this way, if he’s alive, as my wife said - just, drop him off.


M: Just take him somewhere, exactly, you can’t take children, you just can’t take children, he’s three, he’s three years old, he’s only lived for three years, it’s ridiculous.

P: He hasn’t started life.


M: He hasn’t, he hasn’t started, he hasn’t gone to school, he can sort of count. He’s reached none of those milestones that we all take for granted, and we watch his sister go through all these stages, we watch her learn new skills, we watch her create more friends, we watch her grow, you want that for your children, they have a future.

P: Often people may have seen something that they don’t think is totally relevant, dismiss it as a minor part of an equation, what would you say to those people who may have the slightest bit of information but have not come forward?
D: Say something to police straight away.
M: Yeah.


D: Because what they say or what they bring is another piece to the puzzle that can at least get us closer to an outcome. As I said before we’re praying for a miracle for him to return alive, but praying for an outcome so at least we can know what’s happened, that’s the goal at the end of the day.



P: If they don’t come forward, or even the person who might be very close to whoever’s done this, if they don’t come forward….you don’t want this happening to anyone else.


Both: No.


M: You said right at the beginning, walk a mile in our shoes? You can’t walk a mile in our shoes unless it’s actually happened, and I don’t think any parent, anywhere, deserves to walk a mile in our shoes. It shouldn’t happen - it just should not happen.

Read more at http://www.9news.com.au/national/2015/04/17/12/28/read-the-full-transcript-from-william-tyrrells-parents#rIB7tsLsWe0CDjyY.99

Anonymous said...

mum did something

Hey Jude said...

Sloane Berrie - do you have a transcript of the '60 Minutes' parents' interview, by any chance? I just listened, and it's messy and not that much from the parents given the runtime, but if there is no transcript, I'd be happy to make one.

I find the 'Where's William?' website interesting - it's sentimental, merchandised and they plan events with no expectation of William's possible return in the meantime. Some past tense language in the 'About William' page, presumably written quite early on. I don't know if it's anything to do with their being foster rather than biological parents, and maybe going overboard in the attempt to persuade how rosy William's life was, etc., but I find it sickly.

Hey Jude said...

'William's Mummy' began her 000 call with 'Hi,' and didn't sound as distraught as might be expected, but as I have not lost a three year old I don't know how distraught she should sound - even if she's normally calm, I'd expect more panic in the circumstances - he's three and might have wandered into the bush.

RkBall said...

OT - FYI Peter - BBC article - http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20150906-the-best-and-worst-ways-to-spot-a-liar

Best wishes for 2016.

Anon "I" said...

Thank-you Peter and Heather for all you do. :) I am always learning something new and using it in real life. Although, I *do* worry about you analyzing my posts.

In the above transcript, some things jump out at me. The word "just" is used like its water or air. It's everywhere! Secondly, the onus of the child being careful to watch/check-in that he's within hearing distance or sight seems strange. At age three, the parents should be the ones watching out for him, not him for himself. Why would she think he was abducted before checking to see if he went into the house? I will not ever discount true intuition because of my family as well as my own personal experiences, but her describing a vision of him being lifted up by the shoulders and the clump sound is very specific. I'm looking forward to see what others share about this little boy.

Anon "I" said...

I want to add that the above was from my reading the transcribed words above. In going onto an article link, it was noticed that there were two unrecognized cars in the neighborhood and pedophiles were possible. The article, also, noted that the family was ruled out. In looking at the picture of the yard, there may not have been a door accessible on that side of the house that he might have used to go inside. The 911 tape seems calm. I hear her "hi" and her voice trembling a bit. I wonder if this is a cultural difference ie: stiff upper lip type reaction? I lost track of my young son in the house once and PANIC-ED until I found him behind a mattress that was leaning up against a wall that created a triangle shaped clearance. It looked just like a fort to a little fellow, but the mattress was only there temporarily. I was reasonably sure he was in the always locked house, but I still freaked out when I couldn't locate him in the first minute or two. The feeling was one of terror.

Sloane Berrie said...

Hey Jude, no I don't have the transcript of the 60 Minute interview.

Anon "I", they police found the one car but the public is not 100% sure if it was the actual car that police got. However, the latest news said that the car they impounded had no trace of William in it.

Also, with regards to the two cars spotted across the yard. William went missing early morning and throughout the day the f/mother never mentioned or "remembered" the cars, until late that night when she returned from the airport when she collected a family member.

NO ONE else saw these cars, not even the f/dad. He left the house shortly before William went missing...

A LOT of search warrants of nearby registered sex offenders were issued and executed, but no evidence were found that William was ever in their houses etc. It seems from the fact there are no arrests, that all these pedo's alibi's checked out.

Anon "I" said...

Sloane Berrie- Thanks, this is the first time I have heard of this case somehow. What do you make of the parents?

Hey Jude said...

For some reason, the police didn't make public for months that the mother saw two cars - that might be because she was the only person who claimed to have seen them. In one of the three 'Little Boy Lost' audio links which I posted above, the neighbours say they saw no cars, including a neighbour who thought she would have driven past round about the time William was said to have disappeared. The mother, I believe, said the cars had been parked up there for as long as two days - no-one else saw them - it is described as a cul-de-sac.

John mcgowan said...

ima.grandma said...

""It's not like her to just do this -- leave the kids like that." I sense the beginning of victim blaming."


Hi

Yes. It is very subtle.

I hope you're doing well :)

Andrew said...

Regarding "dhimmitude:"

For a long, long time now, Christians in the West have been dhimmis under the rule of militant secularists. We have been defeated and conditioned to dhimmitude by our own cultural elites.

Is it really surprising, then, that so many people in the West would adopt a similar posture toward an external threat?

I will say this: as a traditional Roman Catholic, I would be hard pressed to choose between progressive dhimmitude under Western atheists (who actively promote blasphemy, pornography, addictive behaviors, mental laziness, political correctness, and immorality of every kind) and dhimmitude under Islam.

At least the Muslims believe in something other than the gratification of their material needs. They also revere our Lord and our Lady, albeit in a false (heretical) way. In fact, I strongly suspect that the entire "conflict" between the West and the Islamic world is the result of the West's intolerance of any belief system that places authority at a level higher than the state.

Our elites sowed the wind many years ago when they declared war on the West's Christian underpinnings. They are reaping the whirlwind today. In this war, I am a conscientious objector.

Hey Jude said...

Andrew - it's interesting you term yourself a Roman Catholic rather than Catholic.

mom2many said...

I followed the William Tyrell case for a little while when it first happened, but I haven't kept up. I remember the foster family was cleared early on. There was quite a ban on the media on airing anything about the parents, so there was nothing public to either suspect or disprove their involvement. Reading this transcript throws some red flags.

“Our” - noted but not emphasized at the moment given that William was a foster child shared between two families.

M: Well, when I realised that William was missing, I just, I think back to that moment where I just went, I can’t hear him, why, why can’t I hear him, and I walked around, seriously it was just 2, 3 metres away from where we were sitting, and I’ve just walked out, and I just see nothing. I see nothing, I hear nothing, I’m speechless. I’m walking around in a circle on the spot thinking, where is he, why can’t I see him, and I’m yelling out, “William, where are you, you need to talk to Mummy, tell me where you are, I can’t see you, I can’t hear you, where are you?”, and he was nowhere, and I’m just standing there thinking, how could he just disappear because he just disappeared and I don’t get it, I don’t get it.

She switches tenses in the middle of this statement. She's telling a story.

M: I thought that immediately, I had a vision in my head, I don’t know why, but I had a vision in my head – somebody - I can’t explain it, somebody reached over and I sort of feel like they’ve gone “clump” on his shoulders, picked him up and moved him on because to me that’s the only way, the only way I can explain for him not to be there. I don’t get it, I don’t - how can a little boy, how can a 3-year-old boy just vanish [clicks fingers] into nothing? Because that’s exactly what it was like.

Note vision repeated.

M: It was in my head and even Mum, while I was talking with Mum while we were waiting and I was doing the frantic thing and running through the house and opening up cupboards and all sorts of stuff, I just kept going through my head, somebody’s taken him, I can’t, in my mind it was the only logical explanation for what could have happened.

This statement is contradictory. Was she talking and waiting, or running around frantically? Emotion in context noted, but I believe this interview is a year later.

M: I don’t think it’s somebody from the community. I think it’s somebody who doesn’t have a history there, I think it’s…If, I mean I don’t know for sure. I can’t see, I can’t see a true local who knows my Mum, who knows us, and knows our family, choosing to take our child. I can’t see that, and if that’s the case, then I feel so sorry for that community, because that is absolutely disgraceful and nobody can trust a soul. That’s not the community of Kendall, people trust each other there.

This is oddly specific. Mum is not from the community. She is not a true local. She can't “see a true local” abducting William.

cont.

mom2many said...

part two...

M: I took the photo, I took three photos, I do photo books, of what we do as a family every year. So every time we go somewhere I have my camera and I just take pictures of what they’re doing, and I thought Mum’s getting old, be really good for William and his sister to have memories of being at Mum’s. And my Dad passed away in February that year so that was really the first time we’d been back since Dad passed away, and we were going to go visit Dad’s grave, they were drawing some pictures to put on his grave, they were sending messages to Opa and things like that. I just thought, I want to just take some pictures of that.

So I look at that picture and I remember what we were doing and why we were doing it. I remember William just being absolutely beside himself with happiness at being at Nanna’s house, I remember the discussion with William about putting on his Spiderman clothes because I wanted him to wear a singlet, he didn’t want to wear a singlet, so the compromise was he’d wear a Spiderman t-shirt underneath his Spiderman clothes, so he was Spidermanned out, completely.


All these little things that I just remember, it was just, a normal family, doing normal family things, with their grandmother. D had an appointment which is not unusual, he works remotely. We were going to wait for him to come home and then we were going to go and visit Dad’s grave, then we were going to go out, so we’d planned the day. And I look at that picture and I just think, minutes, minutes, and our world has changed. His sister no longer has a brother, we no longer have a son, we no longer have a child, we no longer have our boy. My Mum is coping with her own grief because it happened at her house, it’s just awful.


Photo repeated and then changes to picture. What changed?
'Just' and 'normal' noted. Normal because this is a foster family?

Then sister no longer has brother...'we' no longer have son … becomes child … becomes boy.

Sloane Berrie said...

Do you All think the f/mum will go into elaborate answers, almost unnecessary explanations to simple questions asked?

tania cadogan said...

It doesn't look good for William, I also noted the change from past to present tense and story telling from the mother.

I don't know if they have interviewed the other children as to when they last saw William, how he was physically and emotionally.

Did she do it alone or is hubby involved as well since the children may have thought William was with his dad and not been concerned.

Dad gets to dispose of William then goes to his meeting (was it verified and times checked) or does the meeting and then disposes of William.

Thanks for the transcript Sloane Berrie

Hey Jude said...

I haven't had time to read the transcript yet - but going on the website I'd say they are trying too hard, saying a lot of irrelevant stuff about William's likes and dislikes etc, whilst also not giving the impression that they believe William to be alive.

Also, I was curious about the photo - 'William's Mummy' (barf) said she took it, and that he was looking right into her eyes at the time - he's not even looking in her direction. Weird. As is all the 'William's Mummy' nonsense - it's meant to appeal to the reader's sympathies, but it's as though they are telling a story to five year olds - utterly patronising unless five years olds are the intended readership. If my three year old were missing and I was appealling for help I wouldn't be writing about myself as 'Mummy' or making the site like a twee storybook or one of those sentimental Mummy Blogs.

mom2many said...

I'm wondering what kind of thing might make a "clump" sound. Shutting a car trunk? Something else heave and metallic?

mom2many said...

^ should read heavy.

Anonymous said...

@Jude,

what struck me odd was her stating she had put him in a tree earlier. At age three, I'd be reluctant to do so as they are swift climbers as a rule and could easily get out of reach and far from the ground only to hear a "clump" on the ground later.

I baby sitted one time and a two year old shimmied up a tree in the front yard so fast and when I saw her my heart sank. I couldn't believe one so small could do what she did! It was a horrible, horrible day. Beside the tree climbing, a man had been circling the block looking at them and when I went to the road on his way around again he stopped (asked me if they were mine) and when I looked in he had kids drawings and things. It was spooky.

The child in the tree could have easily been the child in the car headed elsewhere.

No one with good sense would put a child that small in a tree!

Hey Jude said...

I wondered if he fell out of the tree, and if the 'clump' was the sound of him hitting the ground. William's mother says she tried to make him climb the tree, she put him into the tree, and he didn't like it. Maybe the tree was on her mind, as she drew attention to it. Spider-Man wouldn't be afraid to climb trees; perhaps she was trying to encourage him in boyish pursuits (he was attached to a girl doll, Tara, and his older role model sibling was a sister). That tree looks a little too high for a three year old to scale on his own, but what say she put him in the tree, as she says,and he maybe climbed higher, out of her reach - he could have had a very unlucky fall. I'd think no, as she would have called an ambulance - unless, possibly, the other child/ren are foster children, too, and she feared they would be removed, and she would lose them all. Well, it would be obvious she had put him in the tree, as it's too high for him to have been able to climb by himself to where the branches begin.

She went in for coffee/tea and left William 'roaring around in the garden' - did she maybe leave him in the tree? She explains the roaring a lot and brings in 'Mummy Monsters' - was she roaring at him too, and maybe went inside and left him in the tree to man-up?

Their focus on the Tara doll - maybe some issue, as he was three and a half - perhaps they decided it was time for him to give up Tara and be like Spider-Man and climb trees. I think somehow, they feel bad about Tara, but I don't know why -'perhaps it's guilt, if they had been trying to make him give up his attachment to the doll.

Another thought - the 'clump' sound could be that of a closing rigid suitcase. They were visiting, they'd have suitcases. As you say, also a car trunk - maybe several clumping sounds. If William had been hoisted by his shoulders over the fence (that's quite a tall fence - it would be a difficult manoeuvre ) he surely would have screamed and struggled - someone would have heard him - I'm not sure how that would create a clumping sound. I don't think he was hauled over the fence, or abducted.

---

Other thoughts - 'the world just came to a screaming halt' - that sounds like a car accident.
On the website the car is mentioned several times. William liked the car, liked waiting for his father, liked to help park the car while standing on the driveway, etc. His mother said he was waiting for his father that day, to return in his car.

Maybe she put him in the tree, and maybe he could see the road better from there - maybe he climbed higher to see more. Maybe his mother went inside thinking he would stay put in the fork of the tree because he didn't like it, but maybe he then did climb higher. Perhaps he fell when he saw his father and tried to climb back down - perhaps the father saw him fall and his car screeched to a halt.

---
Stop it, I know. Tomorrow I will read and listen to as many of their words as I can find, I will follow the pronouns, and stop pulling ideas out of the air. :-/

Hey Jude said...

Anon - lol, I'm glad,it's not only me speculating about the tree. :)

mom2many said...

A question for those who have followed this case to the present, was William Spedding cleared of involvement? Could "clump" have been the van door closing?

I wondered about the tree, too. It's such an odd thing to do, and then admit to later.

Hey Jude said...

Mom2many - here's his video-taped denial, made around a year after William's disappearance. I think he's still a POI. And a sex offender - two female victims, aged three and six, the case is historical.

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/bill-spedding-person-of-interest-in-william-tyrell-disappearance-records-video-statement-denying-involvement/story-fni0cx4q-1227520959271

Shortened version, from the webpage:


'Hello, I’m Bill Spedding. My wife Margaret and I offer the Tyrrell family our sincere commiserations in the tragic event of William’s disappearance,”

“I wish to state that I have had no involvement whatsoever in the disappearance of William Tyrrell. I have noted in the media that some events have been reported inaccurately, I wish to clarify those details.

I first attended the Tyrrell house on Tuesday, the 9th of September, 2014 to repair a washing machine. I returned to complete the repair of the washing machine on Thursday, the 18th of September, 2014.

“I have not been in the Tyrrell house or to the Tyrrell house or to the street before, between or after these dates. The media have reported that I was supposed to attend the Tyrrell house on the 12th of September 2014, this being the day of William’s disappearance.

"I wish to make it perfectly clear that this claim is completely false.”

(They published an incomplete transcript - he says more at the end),

----

A podcasr of William's mother speaking is further down the page.

MzOpinion8d said...

Does mentioning heaven mean anything? Is it leakage?

One thing I can say for sure...they want everyone to believe they were just a normal perfect family visiting grandma. Are they sensitive about that because he's not really their child?

I really want to know why their identity has to be top secret.

Hey Jude said...

Podcast
William's mother's opening words:
'it was just any other normal day for us....'


---

I think there could be sensitivity round that - I wonder how old William was when he entered their care. If he was not a baby, and already knew someone else as grandma, that could cause problems - also if grandma viewed William as less of a grandchild than any other grandchildren.

Do we know if William was related to them - is he at the centre of a familial custody dispute? I can't think how else he was shared between two foster families, unless one was temporary, and only for occasional respite care, in which case it would hardly be worth mentioning, or describing as 'shared'. Maybe two siblings fostering the child or children of a third sibling. If that he was 'shared' is factual, that is. The 'William's Mummy' thing is laid on a bit thick - publicly staking and asserting ownership, maybe.

Anonymous said...

About the Marisol Espinosa case, interesting, I went to the facebook missing Marisol Espinosa page, not sure who runs it, but a client of hers was mentioning what a great person she IS, and the facebook page runner replied with "yes she WAS".
I think there are more than one person running it, because some is coherent, while some of it is not at all.

John mcgowan said...

M: "I thought that immediately, I had a vision in my head, I don’t know why, but I had a vision in my head – somebody - I can’t explain it, somebody reached over and I sort of feel like they’ve (a shift from singular to plural) gone “clump” on his shoulders, picked him up and moved him on because to me that’s the only way, the only way I can explain for him not to be there"

The word "clump" as some have pointed out could be the sound of someone or something hitting the floor. If it was an accident (baby Deorr, comes to mind) and he did die through falling (tree) then the highlighted, picked him up and moved him on, maybe what "somebody" They've" done, covered it up, moved the body, and this is why, she says, it is "the only way i can explain for him not to be there".

Puzzling!

John mcgowan said...

The shift from singular to plural maybe sharing of responsibility, guilt? The guilt could be that they were not more vigilant in watching him, or, that they know what happened and are covering it up?

Elizabeth Norway said...

For me, it was the Madeleine McCann case that brought me to your blog.
At that time, you did not find any lies in her parents statements, and I was one of very few who said that they were not truthful, and had knowledge of their daughter's disappearance.

I remember there was one poster, called hobnobs or something like that, who agreed with me.

Luckily, you found out later that their statements were not truthful.


I am now a regular poster at the jillhavern forum, and the fate of poor Madeleine is especially in my thoughts now, as my youngest daughter will turn four years tomorrow. How could they do it? How could they act so cold, leave Madeleine in the creche all day, and be almost indifferent to her?

Anonymous said...

Jude,
Perhaps it's a normal day to her, but in reality it wasn't. The grandpa now deceased would make that day a lot different than it had ever been before.

She stated how good the people in the community were and wouldn't abduct a child. How could she possibly know who's been naughty and who's been nice? She wouldn't. That's just her admiring the quaintness of a town she doesn't live in.

The foster child could have came from drug dealing parents and maybe moved around a lot for a reason if the parents had to testify against another person.

The recent widow could have drawn in bad people simply because now as a single, grieving woman she'd be easy to commit crimes against. (the cars seen in the area).

She could feel guilty because if suspected she may not get other foster children.

Often, those foster care providers weren't provided for themselves at an early age and would want to be the 'perfect' parent to show they've overcome...more guilt.

If her father had recently passed, she could have been easily distracted as things would have been much different at their house that day. Is there a second story? A barn with a loft? (We heard a 'clump' once when my brother fell from a second story barn loft as a child) And, it is possible to scale a tree!

mom2many said...

Thank you, Hey Jude, for the article about Spedding. It is a prepared statement, but still contains the unexpected. I'm not sure why he brings his wife into it before offering a denial. It doesn't fit the formula of a reliable denial.

Peter Hyatt said...

Hi Elizabeth,

Was it you that asked me about the European holocaust center or museum that hired only Muslims and Jews were not there?


Next,

In the initial Maddy case, I did not have interest so much and it was hobs (Tania) who pushed for it. The first statement I had from them was not indicated for deception due to the contamination by the interviewer, and it was too short. There was also the element of working from prior statements (self referencing).

Tania made quite certain that I was given a full transcript of a much more in-depth interview in which they moved from parroting to the free editing process. There, indication of deception via withheld info was evident.

I continue to think that this was another unintended death, perhaps via drugging her to keep her quiet. It has ripped up Tania to see them profit, shift blame and boldly lie and impugn others. What would they feel if someone was arrested and imprisoned wrongly?

I could not live with myself.

This is the same with the Ramsey case. I don't think Patsy could have abided seeing someone lose his life over a crime he did not commit. I do not think the same about John, however.

Lastly,

your thoughts on the documentary's persuasive techniques? Emotionalism versus science of analysis?

I am glad you have been here for so long!

Peter

maudes harold said...

Thank you Peter for all of your generosity sharing both your time and knowledge.

Unknown said...

German police hunt for group of up to 1,000 men 'of Arab and North African origin' who sexually assaulted numerous women and threw fireworks into crowds at Cologne train station on New Year's Eve

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3384423/German-police-hunt-group-1-000-men-Arab-North-African-origin-sexually-assaulted-numerous-women-threw-fireworks-crowds-Cologne-train-station-New-Year-s-Eve.html

http://www.breitbart.com/london/2016/01/04/revealed-1000-migrants-brawl-rape-sexually-assault-steal-one-german-train-station-new-years-eve/

This also happened in Hamburg and Stuttgart on the same evening.

Stuttgart (in German) http://www.stuttgarter-zeitung.de/inhalt.stuttgart-mitte-15-maenner-rauben-zwei-frauen-aus.2d81b878-6c37-4ce3-8c47-08d4f498aabd.html

Hamburg (in German) http://www.bild.de/regional/hamburg/sexuelle-belaestigung/auf-der-reeperbahn-44017940.bild.html

-Wendy

lynda said...

Interesting to know all this info Peter, thanks so much for taking the time to put it all together. Thank you for all you do here also. I find you an honest and fair person, particularly when you allow us to see your own personal struggle with only "following language" instead of being swept away by the emotions generated by a certain case.
I was interested in the Islamic columns as this was something I was unaware of and finding it here, took me to other sites where I could learn and verify what you were saying. I am finding more and more people that just do not want to talk about this which is amusing because it's just as you said..people are so AFRAID of being labeled Islamophobic that they do nothing. At the very least, I feel I can speak fairly intelligently now if the topic arises in a group setting.
Thank you for taking the time to teach and share your expertise with us.

Hey Jude said...

Transcript: 60 Minutes: Where is William Tyrrell?
[To aid clarity: Michael Usher is speaking either with the parents, or with DI Jubelin at a different location - the parents and the DI are not interviewed together.]

Presenter, Michael Usher: One year ago a little boy vanished while he was playing in his grandmother’s back yard. One moment, William Tyrrell, dressed in his favourite Spider-Man suit was playing games with his Mum and sister, the next he was gone, as if he’d disappeared into thin air. Initial panic by his family slowly turned into the darkest of despair, and a whole year later they are simply heartbroken. Who would take their vivacious, funny, innocent three year old boy? It’s a question that torments one of Australia’s toughest and most experienced detectives, who’s heading the task force into William’s disappearance, and tonight we have unprecedented access to that investigation. We also hear for the first time, the full story from William’s parents, who want us all to know about their boy and understand their agony in the hope that someone may have the courage to reveal information that will bring William home.

[video of William at keyboard, singing into microphone, holding his Little Tara doll.]
MU- narrative: A little boy, full of life. Three years old, cheeky, adorable, and most of all, loved.
Mother: Wherever we went eyes would just be drawn to him. He’s just got the most amazing smile, and the smile would just light up his entire face, and it’s just got this giggle that just follows it. It’s just amazing. It was just, everything for him was just absolute - joy.

[camera on unidentifiable parents]
Father: And this is William, you know, and I hear him – I hear his voice. Without watching a video I can hear him say things, but I see all this stuff and it just, it tears me apart.
[MU - narrative: William Tyrrell would have turned four by now, but his life is frozen in time because twelve months ago this gorgeous little boy vanished while on a family holiday to Nan’s house in the country]
Mother: William was stolen. He was abducted, he was kidnapped, he was stolen - whatever word you want to use, somebody decided to take him.

MU - narrative: -Detective Jubelin heads Taskforce Roseann, the team of detectives searching for William Tyrrell.We have unprecedented access to their investigation. Inside their command centre, and inside the mind of a twenty year homicide veteran.
DI Jubelin: Every day I wake up I think ‘This is gonna be the day, um, whenever the phone rings, I’m thinking “This might be the breakthrough that we’re looking for, so.

Hey Jude said...

Continued

MU – narrative: William’s parents also wake every day desperately hoping for that breakthrough. They walk the same beach where William loved playing and long to be hand in hand with their boy – but these toys are all they have to hold onto.
Father [takes Spider-Man toy from a holdall]: Well, there’s a little Spider-Man toy that um, he always used to play with all the time.
MU - narrative: Private family matters mean the family, and we, can’t show their full identity, but this is the first time they’ve been able to tell their story freely, so people can understand their loss and know a lot more about their boy.
[Video – William’s birthday]
MU: What are some of the other things that he…?
Father: Uh, probably the one that he, he always uh slept with most of the time, when he always went to bed he, he would always ask for it um, and th-which was little Tara
MU: They’re always funny things they get attached to, aren’t they?
Mother [cutting in]: Yeah, and I just – [becomes emotional] yeah, he yeah, he can’t sleep without little Tara - so – yeah.
MU: These are the things that were inseparable from him
Mother: Yep, so – I just need him to be sleeping with something that he loves. Looking after him, because he doesn’t have little Tara
MU: I can even see the way you’re holding it now this is the most tangible thing you have right now
Mother: It’s all we’ve got of him. We’ve got everything that he played with and he loved but that’s all we’ve got, we don’t have our boy. And we need him home

MU: There are legal complications in relation to the family, but does that have any bearing on William’s disappearance, at all?
DI Jubelin: No, it has absolutely no bearing – I know there’s speculation on behalf of the public, but it has no bearing on the uh disappearance of William, at all.
MU: For the record, can you rule out that there is any family involvement in William’s disappearance?
DI Jubelin: Yes, we’ve ruled tha – ruled that out

MU - narrative: The town of Kendall is half an hour from Port Macquarie, on the New South Wales mid-north coast. It’s a peaceful country town popular with families and retirees. William’s Nana lived here on this big, tranquil bush block just on the edge of town.
MU: And having been there, this is a happy home, a big
Mother: Yep
MU: safe back yard
Mother: Yep
MU: And a very quiet safe neighbourhood
Mother: Yep, absolutely
MU: A cul-de-sac
Mother: No reason to think otherwise. No reason at all to think otherwise – the furthest thing from our mind

Hey Jude said...

Continued..

MU - narrative: It was a last minute decision to visit Nana’s. Young William and his slightly older sister get a delightful surprise when their parents pick them up from day care early for the four hour drive north from their Sydney home. The next morning is Friday September 12th, 2014.
Mother: We wake up, um, we hear giggling and laughter and me telling everybody to be quiet and not wake up Nana, 'cause Nana was still asleep.
MU - narrative: On that morning, William dresses in his favourite Spider-Man outfit. His businessman father briefly leaves the house to get better mobile phone reception and run a few jobs in town. William, his sister, and Mum, go outside to play and explore in Nana’s expansive backyard.
Mother: I thought I’d see if he wanted to climb some trees, so I was holding him up and saying. "Do you want to a climb a tree?" and he was like, "No, Mummy, too high". And then we were playing and I was playing, ahm ‘Mummy Monsters’ and so he’s chasing me and I’m doing the whole ‘raarrgh’ thing, and you know, and I’m chasing him, and he’s giggling his head off.
[photo of William in Spider-Man suit]
MU: That great photo, of William in his Spider-Man suit - that was taken on the deck?
Mother: Yes. It was really weird ‘cause he was, he was doing ‘Raarrgh! Daddy Tiger’, and that photo I took was um, he was actually looking up at me, and I’ve - sort of crouched down in a really weird position and taken the photo, and um, it was mid-roar, which is why his mouth’s wide open.
MU: That was part of the game?
Mother: That was a ‘Raargh Daddy Tiger’ thing, and that was a ‘Raargh!’
MU: When was the last you saw him?
Mother: Playing around that patio area. Mum and I were sitting on two chairs, and then he jumped off – and he was playing on the - the grass [pause] and then what he did was, he went, um, just around to the right. I could still hear him. He was roaring, umm, and then umm, nothing.
MU: What was the very last you saw or heard of William?
Mother: That was it. So that’s, yeah, that’s my last sound, my last sound memory of William, is ‘Raarrgh!’, and then it’s nothing. And then it’s just silence and he’s just vanished.

[Michael Usher and DI Jubelin in grandmother’s garden]
DI Jubelin: We’ve literally got a situation where a child has disappeared, and as if it was just plucked, or William was just plucked from the air.
Mother: I couldn’t see him, I couldn’t hear him. It was the world, you -it’s like the world just came to a screaming halt, I just - there was no wind, there were no birds, there was no movement - there was nothing. And I’m looking out around this garden, I’m thinking, “Where are you?”, and I’ve just said “William, where are you? You need to talk to me, I can’t see you. Where are you?” And there was nothing.

Hey Jude said...

Continued

MU – narrative: Det Gary Jubelin retraces William’s last steps.
MU: He jumped down here
DI Jubelin: Yes, that’s right
MU: After that?
DI Jubelin: After that headed off around in this direction, around the uh, corner of the uh house. Um the mother still heard uh, she heard him say “Raarrgh!” again, in keeping with the game he was playing at the time.
MU: And that, we think he’s around about here?
DI Jubelin: Yeah, this general area, ‘cause it was out of sight, and she heard it, and ah that was the last time ah she heard ah, William.
MU – narrative: Detective Jubelin believes William wanders down the slope towards the tree where he’d been playing with his mother just an hour before.
DI Jubelin: I’m looking here and thinking a child’s not going to wander up in the bush.
MU: It’s a steep hill
DI Jubelin: I just – it’s a steep hill, it’s thick bush, it’s scary. For a three year old child it’’s scary. There’s a fence line there – I can’t see him going through the fence line. I can see a child wandering off uh, down, down the slope.

MU – narrative: At the time William was excitedly waiting for his father to return. He and his four year old sister would often make a game of it.
Father: They would always run to the gate
Mother: They – yeah, yeah
Father: Looking out for me and my car
Mother [cutting in]: And I remember saying “Can you see Daddy’s car?” And there was no answer. There was no answer. And then I raced back around, and I said to Mum, “He’s not there, he’s gone”, and she said “What do you mean, he’s gone?” and I said, “Dee-he’s disappeared, he’s not there.” I just, I just kept racing round the house going, “Where are you? You’ve - talk to me – where are you? [inhales deeply] – and I couldn’t see him [voice breaking], and I couldn’t hear him, huhm, I just didn’t know where he was.
MU - narrative: By now, William’s Dad arrives home. Distraught, he is joined by neighbours in the search. Both parents know their cautious boy just wouldn’t wander off.
Mother: I thought “I won’t call the police straight away just in case he’s next door, or –“
Father: Or he turns up
Mother: “Or he just turns up – just in case”
MU: You just could never have imagined that he would be taken
Mother: No, I just, I didn’t expect any of this to happen, I expected him to be back, um, and um, I, I phone the police, or the triple ‘O’ number, and I just think to myself, “keep it together, keep it together, keep it together, keep it together” because it was just becoming so real that we had no idea where he was. [Inhales] So I [?-saw him, then us-?], then I just say, -ss, um, a child’s missing
[Excerpt from 000 call is played:
Mother: Yeah, hi. My son is missing, he’s three and a half.
Operator: Okay
Mother: Um - sorry?
Operator: Your address
Mother: Um, uh, 48, Benaroon Drive, Kendall
Operator: How long has he been missing?
Mother: I, well, I think, well, we’ve been looking for him now for about fifteen or twenty minutes but
Operator: Okay
Mother: But, ah, I thought it could be five, it could be longer because he was just playing around and we heard him and then we heard nothing]

Hey Jude said...

Continued

Mother: I said right at the beginning, “Somebody has taken William". It was absolutely screaming at me.

MU - narrative: Senior Constable Chris Rowley is just four kilometres away when the call goes out to all local police cars. He lives in Kendall, has three children of his own, and knows Benaroon Drive well.
MU: What’s your first encounter when you arrive in the neighbourhood?
Con. Rowley: When I turned into Benaroon Drive I ran into Mum, in the street, she was obviously out searching, she was obviously upset
MU – narrative: The first officer on the scene, Chris gets the family back to the house to search the place inside out, just in case William is hiding. It’s here he meets his dad.
Con. Rowley: Yeah, he was a mess, um, you could just tell he was distraught.
MU: When you’re a father, what do you say to another father?
Con. Rowley: I just, you know, I just touched him on the shoulder – I said. “Mate, we won’t stop. Okay, we’ll be here tomorrow, there’ll be more of us, it’ll get bigger and bigger, and we’ll, you know, keep looking.”
MU - narrative: It did get a lot bigger – by the end of the day two hundred police, SES, and locals were searching for William. As night passes, Vanessa Partridge is the first detective sent to Benaroon Drive. Also a local, and a mother, straight away, she just knows something isn’t right
Vanessa Partridge: I got out of the car, and I just had this feeling that things weren’t right. There's, there's something wrong. William’s not missing
[Simultaneously]
MU: That’s, that’s a gut instinct
VP: William’s not missing
VP: Yep.
MU: That he’s not missing, that you’re dealing with something bigger than just a child who’s wandered off
VP: I just kept thinking if he was missing we would have found him by now

MU - narrative: And her worse fears are right, a week passes and no-one finds William - not in the bush, not in any dams or drains. He has vanished. Police make the heart-breaking decision to tell his family to pack their car and drive home to Sydney
Mother: We’ve got his bike
Father: His toys
Mother: we’ve got his suitcase,
Mother: We’ve got all his clothes. We’ve got
Father: His Spider-Man toys
Father: Little Tara
Mother: We’ve got Little Tara. We’ve got, um, we’ve got everything, but
Father: except
Mother: we don’t have him
Father: except him
MU: You don’t have William
Mother: [increasingly emotional throughout] And I walked inside, and I walked past his room, and I just, I had no legs, I just collapsed. We had to go back to our house, our family, without, without him. Just, it was heart-wrenching. When I’d go into his room and I’d say goodnight to him, and I’d lie on his bed, and I’d cuddle Little Tara, and I would just pray that he wasn’t scared, and that somebody was loving him – because it’s just, you can’t take him.
[MU breaks down and apologises. Mother laughs]
Mother: Sorry
MU: No, no, no, don’t e - you don’t say “sorry”. I don’t know, I don’t know how you’re doing it, quite frankly
Mother: You have to, there’s no other option
MU: You are so strong, though
Mother: There’s no other option. Life doesn’t stop, it keeps going.

Hey Jude said...

Continued..

[Video of William. MU: Days have become months, and months now a year, and still no William.]
MU: One year on from his disappearance, why haven’t you found William?
DI Jubelin: We’re, we’re making progress, but uh, I have to say that uh, we’re not comfortable, uh, with the fact that twelve months down the track and we still haven’t found out what’s happened to William.
MU: Just how big is this operation?
DI Jubelin: Probably, to put it in perspective, there’s over five thousand documents that have been created in regards to this investigation. Uh, we have in excess of fourteen hundred information reports – this is information that’s come from the public.
MU: Something that hasn’t been made public is the number of search warrants you’ve executed in the search for William. Can you give us more detail of that?
DI Jubelin: There’s been other searches, and search warrants that have been executed that the public are not aware of.
MU: How many people have been interviewed so far?
DI Jubelin: Ah, in excess of a thousand.
MU: Is there a single person of interest?
DI Jubelin: There’s not one single person of interest, there’s a number of persons of interest

[Video of Bill Spedding.]
MU - narrative: One of the persons of interest is this man, Bill Spedding. He’s the local repairman who was at William’s grandmother’s home just four days before he disappeared.
[News clip of Bill Spedding and his wife:
Bill Spedding: We’re co-operating with the police]
MU - narrative: His house has been searched, and septic tank drained

MU: Help me understand, please, the link between the person Bill Spedding and your mother’s house, the place where William went missing
Mother: He’s – uh, was repairing Mum’s washing machine. When we arrived on the Thursday night, Mum already had washing piling up, so I thought I would phone in the morning and just find out when that part had arrived, and when he was coming back to install the part, so I called and left a message.
MU: Can I ask, is there the possibility that he knew that you were going to be arriving and that obviously young William would be with you?
Mother: I don’t know. I mean anything’s possible, but I don’t know. [Nods head affirmatively]

MU - narrative: Since becoming a person of interest in William’s case. Spedding has been charged with child sex offences dating back to 1987. The charges are unrelated to William’s disappearance, for which he denies any involvement.
MU: Bill Spedding has been identified publicly, he’s been spoken to by investigators, it’s known that he had been to the grandmother’s house to service a washing machine, there are questions about his alibi – is Bill Spedding a person of interest in this case?
DI Jubelin: Michael, I can’t comment on specific persons of interest.
MU: Would there be pressure on Bill Spedding today, twelve months on from William’s disappearance?
DI Jubelin: I won’t speak specifically on a particular person, but what I will say is anyone that’s considered a person of interest for us should feel the pressure because we’re not giving up on this, and we’ll continue on

[MU and DI in grandmother's garden]
MU - narrative: Detective Inspector Jubelin now has a theory as to what happened to William in those short terrifying minutes one year ago. He discounts the idea an abductor ran up the yard and onto the property to take the little boy.
DI Jubelin: Look at the house up there. You don’t know who’s looking out, you don’t know who’s looking there – to do that, I think it’s very audacious, but unlikely, extremely unlikely
MU: William used to play a game where he’d run down the driveway for Dad to come home – is that likely what brought him right down to the edge of the road – he’s looking out for Dad?

Hey Jude said...

Continued..

DI Jubelin: Yeah – I can understand how a three year old might think “Dad’s coming home” – waiting for him, knowing he was due home soon, and coming down the roadway and looking for him. Then, if someone who has a propensity to commit an evil act like this decides “this is a situation I’m going to take advantage of”, and that’s what we call an opportunistic situation, an opportunist crime.
MU: Do you have to put yourself in a very dark place and look at it through the eyes of the potential perpetrator, and the possibility of a potential paedophile?
DI Jubelin: You’ve got to put those, the paedophile hat on, so to speak, and look through their eyes – what would they see, what are they doing, why would they react that way?

[MU with DI Jubelin as he drives down Benaroon Drive.]
MU: Who would be driving in here?
DI Jubelin: That’s a dead end street – that’s obviously a dead-end street. You’re coming up here for a reason here – you don’t come up here by accident or by chance.
MU: The fact that he’s in the Spider-Man suit helps your scenario, too, doesn’t it? Because it’s very easy for a stranger to say, “Hey, Spider-Man!”
Di Jubelin: Yeah, I, I think the Spider-Man suit plays a part in this - in that, exactly, any stranger could come up and you could get a rapport happening with William straight away by calling him “Spider-Man”
MU: Which absolutely gives you the chills when you stand here. To think that it’s happened that quickly
DI Jubelin: Yeah, and then that person has decided to take a three year old child, to snatch a three year old, and that said, there’s two worlds colliding, and I say it’s like evil meeting innocence.

[Photos of William]
Mother: We imagine what was going through his head when that was happening, he would have been beside himself
Father: That would be -
Mother: – he would have been petrified.
Father [distressed]: That, that, that tears my heart out
Mother: Yeah
Father: - it - it’s really,
Mother: Yeah
Father: really disturbing
Mother: Yeah. And he would’ve been desperately, desperate for us to come and get him, absolutely desperate
Father: He would’ve, would’ve, would’ve been thinking
Mother [cutting in]: And he would’ve
Father: “When are they coming for me? Where are they? Why aren’t they here? I mean –“

MU - narrative: But after William was taken, where did he go? There are only two ways out of this neighbourhood – at this T-junction one road goes through the tiny town of Kendall, the other is a quiet country road that winds through bushland. Both are very easy routes for the abductor to go unnoticed, and choosing which way right now is pure guess work, making William’s disappearance an even greater mystery.
MU: Stranger abduction is incredibly rare – how rare is it as a crime?
DI Jubelin: Ahh, it’s very rare, like we’re talking a three year old child, too, invariably when people abduct a child, that they want – say a childless couple, they’re younger children. Uh, if you look at the possible scenario of a paedophile abducting child, generally, they are older, so it’s a fairly unique crime.

Hey Jude said...

Continued..

[MU and DI at Task Force Roseanne Centre]
MU – narrative: When little William Tyrrell went missing, he was wearing the most distinctive of outfits, his Spider-Man suit, it was his favourite. Now, a year on, that outfit is a haunting reminder for William’s parents of the day he went missing. And for detectives it is a key aspect of their investigation. It’s a two-piece set, this almost identical suit was ordered by the police from the exact shop in Burleigh, where William’s parents bought his.
MU: So you’ve had a lot of sightings, or people calling in saying “I’ve found a Spider-Man suit”?
DI Jubelin: Yeah, and we get that, and we’re encouraging the public to come forward with that type of information. Just to help us sift through all the information, it’s a two-piece suit, not a jumpsuit, or whatever, and it’s this size. So if there’s something they come across which is suspicious, we are interested in it – but yes, gives you a sense of it, doesn’t it?
MU: Very sadly, it does. I think the thing that strikes me the most is just how little this fella was
DI Jubelin: Yes
MU: This is a little tiny guy
DI Jubelin: Yeah, that brings it home, doesn’t it, when you can see the size of it, and if someone – uh, William fits into that, how small he was, and to be taken in the circumstances he was taken is just horrific
MU - narrative: Then there’s the information that for the first time tonight is being made public by police. William’s mother also saw two cars earlier that morning, parked strangely, with the drivers’ windows down. The specific makes and models of the cars are not known.
DI Jubilen: Oh, we’ve got the general description of the vehicles – one’s a white ah, station wagon, another is an older style greyish coloured ah, sedan, but what ah, makes us suspicious of these particular vehicles is that they weren’t parked in a driveway, they were parked inbetween driveways. So, we’re talking, on acre lots, the driveways are about ah, a hundred metres apart.
MU: Suspicious because in that neighbourhood, even if you’re visiting a relative or doing some business there, or some work on the house, you park in the driveway or on the land because the lots are that big
DI Jubelin: Yeah, there’s no logical explanation as to why they would uh, park in the location they were, and they were very close to each other, given that’s a dead-end street, that raises our curiosity, and we’re interested in finding out who these people are, and what they were doing there at the time
.

Hey Jude said...

Continued..

[Photos of William]
MU – narrative: And the best William’s family can do, as birthdays pass and another Christmas approaches, is to appeal to anyone who may have suspicions about a loved one being involved in their boy’s disappearance.
Mother: The person who took William might have a family of their own. They’ve got friends. I don’t understand how someone who may think, even if it’s like fifty percent chance this person may have done something to this little boy
MU: Or know something
Mother: – that they can sit next to them, that they can watch TV, that they can have a meal with, they can have a coffee with – how on earth can they, in all good conscience, sit there and condone that person taking a child? Defenceless, helpless, three year old child. How on earth?
MU: Innocent little boy
Mother: Completely innocent. It’s not right. And how on earth can you sit there and say “it’s okay” with your silence. Because it’s not okay.
MU: Because somebody knows
Mother [cutting in] Absolutely!
MU: what happened to William
Mother: Absolutely somebody knows what happened to William
Father: Without doubt
Mother: Without a doubt
Father: Without doubt
Mother: They absolutely know

[Photos of William]
DI Jubilen: if you’ve got any doubts, if you look at someone and you’ve got suspicion, pass that suspicion onto police.
MU: They are evil by association now, aren’t they?
DI Jubilen: One hundred percent, no excuse – I, I, I, I can’t even fathom what an excuse would be not to pass this information on. If you’re protecting someone that you think’s involved in this, you’re as bad as the person involved in it.
MU: That person or those people’s silence is a crime.
DI Jubilen: That is a crime – that’s concealing a serious offence.
MU – narrative: This coming week it will be a year since a good boy from a good family disappeared from his grandmother’s back yard. Barely a day passes when Detective Inspector Gary Jubelin is not in contact with William’s family – he just wishes he had more to tell them.
DI Jubilen: I don’t think you’d be human, or you wouldn’t have emotion if you couldn’t be touched on uh, by what they’re going through – it’s a living nightmare.
MU: Do you feel like you’re failing them by not being able to provide them with a very clear answer about where he is?
DI Jubilen: I, it does not sit well with me, and my promise to them is that we’ll do everything humanly possible to find out what’s happened to William. I’m not giving up on this by any means
MU: I’m sorry to even have to ask this, but, I mean, do you believe William is dead or alive?
DI Jubilen: We’ve had over four hundred and seven sightings of William since his disappearance, and sometimes we get excited about the sightings, and it was only about six weeks or so ago, where – I liken, that probably the best way to describe it is that I had goosebumps, and we genuinely thought that ah, we had found William, but as that turned out, that wasn’t the case. Uh, we don’t close our minds to any possibility.

Hey Jude said...

Continued...

[video of William]
Mother: I remember being three. What was your world when you were three? Your world was your mum and dad, your world was your family – what is William’s world?
MU: A very difficult question, but after a year, do you allow yourselves to cling to hope – that William will be found, and found alive?
Father: You haveta – there’s, wh -I guess where there’s a chance there’s always a chance, and that’s, I’ve, I’ve tried to hold onto that.
Mother: There’s no evidence that says that he’s not – there’s nothing to suggest that he’s not alive
MU: Yes, but you need to, you need to bring William home
Mother: [nodding head] Yeah, yeah. He’s got nowhere else to be but home.
Father: That’s where he should be
Mother: That’s where he needs to be
Father: For all of us
Mother: Yeah. For him
__
MU: Detective Inspector Jubilen has asked that if anyone has any information on Williams’s disappearance call Crimestoppers 1800 333 000 or go to the Crimestoppers website -Crimestoppers.com.au – every piece of information helps.


[End]

mom2many said...

Wow, you've been working hard! Thank you for this! I haven't finished reading it all, but here's what grabbed me on first reading, noted in chronological order from the beginning.

He’s just got the most amazing smile, and the smile would just light up his entire face, and it’s just got this giggle that just follows it. It’s just amazing. It was just, everything for him was just absolute - joy.

The pronoun from 'he' to 'it' really jumped out at me as unexpected here.

Playing around that patio area. Mum and I were sitting on two chairs, and then he jumped off – and he was playing on the - the grass [pause] and then what he did was, he went, um, just around to the right. I could still hear him. He was roaring, umm, and then umm, nothing.

The hesitations here seem particularly sensitive. Early reports stated he was outside alone, that Mum had run into the house to make tea or something. I'm not certain which version is the truth.

[Excerpt from 000 call is played:
Mother: Yeah, hi. My son is missing, he’s three and a half.
Operator: Okay
Mother: Um - sorry?
Operator: Your address
Mother: Um, uh, 48, Benaroon Drive, Kendall
Operator: How long has he been missing?
Mother: I, well, I think, well, we’ve been looking for him now for about fifteen or twenty minutes but
Operator: Okay
Mother: But, ah, I thought it could be five, it could be longer because he was just playing around and we heard him and then we heard nothing]


The emergency call transcript. She starts with "Yeah, hi." And a "sorry" immediately follows her statement that her son is missing.

It was absolutely screaming at me.

What was screaming at her?

Also, all of what Jubilen has stated to this point in the transcript seems hesitant, sensitive, particularly the part about ruling out the family. Is this an example about a person whose job requires deception by holding back information, so he speaks carefully and watches his words?

mom2many said...

Here at the end where they are asked if they think William be found alive, it gets weird.

MU: A very difficult question, but after a year, do you allow yourselves to cling to hope – that William will be found, and found alive?
Father: You haveta – there’s, wh -I guess where there’s a chance there’s always a chance, and that’s, I’ve, I’ve tried to hold onto that.
Mother: There’s no evidence that says that he’s not – there’s nothing to suggest that he’s not alive


Dad can't answer coherently, and Mum goes completely negative.

I'd love to hear other reactions to this, particularly Peter's review. It seems the parents have guilty knowledge, but I can't really figure out how they disappeared William so thoroughly, if they did. Wasn't that photo time stamped from the camera? Didn't they report that they had security camera footage of vehicles along the main routes and the ability to see vehicles in and out of the area? They'd be able to verify that along with the cell phone call records and line up Dad's story.

Also, a last note about the sightings, I think William has a rather common look about him. I mean, a lot of little boys look similar at that age. I live half the globe away, and I swear there is a boy here in my tiny city that looks identical, but would be at least two years older than William. I did a double take when I first noticed him!

Hey Jude said...

I forgot to include links to the videos for the transcript:

Parents' Interview-three parts (this one won't load for me on iPad, fine on PC)
http://www.9jumpin.com.au/show/60minutes/stories/2015/september/where-is-william/

Alternatively:
'60 Minutes' Interview with William's parents - three videos:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=KZ9ym2DUu-4
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=fPaFeIXLGOs
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=HxxLQ_K5ljY

Yes, it took a few hours, but I like doing it, and it's a while since I did one. :) I don't have enough stamina to focus on it all now, and have yet to read right through the transcript Sloane Berrie posted of the earlier interview - it's an interesting case though - I'll bookmark and return to it. I don't think William was abducted - I wonder if he was even at the grandmother's house.

mom2many said...

If he was not there, how do you account for the photo?

Hey Jude said...

Mom2Many - A couple of thoughts on the photo. First, I would say the mother could not have taken it, if as she claims, he was looking directly at her when it was taken - he is looking at someone else, in fact she says he's going 'Raarrgh!' which is the game he plays with his father. So, if it was taken that day, and if she took it (it's on her phone so very likely so?) someone else must have been present, the person William was ''raarrghing'' towards and looking at - the father. I wonder if that would conflict with the timeline she gave the police - the nana in bed, the father out - the second child also is in the photo, so none of them could have taken it. Why would he be playing 'Raarrgh!Daddy Tiger' if Daddy is not there? - it's a game which sounds pretty specific to Daddy. 'Mummy Monsters' sounds more specific to her. IMO, something there is not quite straight. Either she said she took it and he was looking at her, as to say otherwise would conflict with her timeline, or it was taken on another occasion, when others were also present.

This is very subjective, I know - but this undated photo posted by NSW Police on Facebook shows, in my opinion, an older, more solid William:

https://www.facebook.com/nswpoliceforce/photos/a.395208846184.158543.218519706184/10152439520231185/
- this child looks closer to four years old than the fragile mite in the Spider-Man photo, who I would put at rising three to just three. It was the choice of the police to release a photo of William with a fading black eye - there are many other photos in which there is no black eye. I'm not going to speculate as to why they chose that one, neither would I assume that it was caused by abuse, as he could have fallen from his bicycle (there's video of him learning to cycle), a swing, or had any type of accident - even so, I note it was their decision to publish that particular picture - they have also distributed the Spider-Man suit picture, perhaps as one of the first available and in accordance with the parents' wishes.

If you Google (images) for William Tyrrell there are several instances in which the Spider-Man image has been Photoshopped out of the background for use in publicity banners; it could just have easily been Photoshopped into the background, though it would take skill as the shadows are good. The shadow skill of the Photoshopper who made the Spider-Man banners is evident in the downloadable publicity material on the Where's William? Website. Still, I think Photoshop conspiracies are mostly unlikely (excepting the Madeleine pool photo), so I'd guess it was an old photo, or if taken that day, William was perhaps not weighing as much as he had in other photos. Build-wise, to me, he appears a slim, active just three year old, in that photo - and others I think could have been taken later.

The photos on this timeline include one of William on his third birthday - he looks the age he is in the Spider-Man photo. Other photos on that page show a William who looks a little older, more a little boy than a tot, filling out - IMO.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-03-02/william-tyrrell-timeline-follows-disappearance-of-nsw-boy/6274088

If it's an old photo, he need not have been at the grandmother's house. She says they will 'never stop" looking for him which indicates she believes he is dead. The family says, on the website, that 'the police believe he is alive'. That might be that the family no longer, really, believes he is alive - I think that doesn't have to mean they know he is dead. I suspect someone in the family knows what happened to William.

Why does William's mother say they were 'sitting on two chairs'! ?

Hey Jude said...

^^^ Spot the logic failure ^^* first paragraph, last sentence. Meh. Of course it could have been taken that day, too, with others present. I got the impression she wanted it to appear she was alone with the children when that photo was taken. Nana was in bed, so they had to be quiet. Let's play some really noisy games, then. Or Nana was on the patio, with her, and they were sitting on two chairs. Will the police tell us how many chairs were on the patio - was there one for each of the adults who were up and about that day, and would that be two chairs, or three? These are the questions we have no answers for, and which are potentially crazy-making. :)

Hey Jude said...

No-one asked how many chairs they were sitting on, but William's mother felt the need to say 'two chairs' - the number of chairs is on her mind. She maybe feels that someone suspects her account might not add up? I can't remember a time it ever seemed necessary to say how many chairs I was sitting on with someone - it's interesting.

I haven't looked at the pronouns yet. :-/

Hey Jude said...

Did the grandmother see William? If they arrived in the evening, it would be easy enough to distract her while one or other parent supposedly carried William to his bed, already asleep. If Nana was up that morning, did she see William, or did she believe he was playing in the expansive garden?

I know the mother says they were sitting on the patio, but I don't remember if she says they both saw William jump down, or just that she saw him jump down from the patio. I suppose it would be difficult to hide that William wasn't there to his sister -that would take some doing. I need to be quiet and follow the pronouns rather than my imagination. :-/

Anonymous said...

"So that’s, yeah, that’s my last sound, my last sound memory of William, is ‘Raarrgh!’."

Oh dear.

If I thought my son had been abducted and the last sound I heard was "raaaargh", I wouldn't be talking so blithely about daddy tigers.

Maybe William was calling out for help.

Anonymous said...

The "surprise" visit bothers me. Wouldn't most grandmothers prefer a bit of notice that their 3 and 4 year old grandchildren were coming to stay? I would want time to get their beds ready and some treats in. I suppose every family is different. How did they know Grandma wasn't visiting a friend, playing bingo, going to a flower show etc.?

IIRC there was a visit scheduled. I wonder why they went early to "surprise" the children and Grandma.

PS. I am sitting on one chair.

Anonymous said...


Oddly specific Facebook post made by POI, Spedding, a few weeks after Williams disappearance.


'Today, somebody is keeping a secret. They got up this morning. Had breakfast. Realised they need to pick up some more milk.
'Wasted time on Facebook. Made some calls. All the while maintaining a poker face.All the while pretending not to know. But somebody knows what happened to three-year-old William Tyrell.
'Somebody knows if William is being treated with kindness today or with cruelty. Somebody, somewhere knows and they’re keeping it a secret. Missing from his home in Kendall , on the NSW coast, Australia since Friday, September 12. PLEASE SHARE AND HOPE HE IS FOUND.'


mom2many said...

Anon @ 8:09pm That post was originally written by someone else and then shared around. It can be found in a online magazine article, but I don't have a direct link. It is a very odd post, no matter who wrote it.

Hey Jude, Interesting thoughts. I had not seen those other photos you linked to, and you are right that he does look a little older in some of them. Hmm.

I do remember seeing a wider angle of the porch shot and you can see grandma's legs with slippers. You could be right that it was taken earlier, though. Did William come with them to the funeral when Grandpa died?

There were a lot of variance in the statements about how much of a surprise visit this really was. The parents seem to have settled on that it was a surprise because they arrived a day earlier than planned. For that matter, early reports about the sisters age varied from a younger sister to much older. That is all odd, too.

I had read somewhere that Grandma just got out of the hospital. I don't know what her ailment was, or if it could be likely she never actually saw William.

Despite all of this, to my very inexperienced eyes, the mother's statements right around the porch and then subsequent disappearance seem the most sensitive and not from experiential memory. The father seems on the whole, less sensitive.

Hey Jude said...

Anon

''PS. I am sitting on one chair.' heh. :-). First smile of the day, that. (I hope you're not feeling too tense as you sit on one chair. )

I wouldn't be terribly pleased if four of my family turned up to stay without notice, or if they arrived a day ahead of schedule, especially if it was late in the day or in the evening - I'm so lastminutedotcom, the day before people arrive is the day I do things. If I was unprepared I'd think that wasn't very welcoming, even if I wasn't expecting them yet. And with little ones especially - you need notice, they normally like to eat certain things. I agree, the idea of taking the children out of daycare to spring a surprise visit on a grandparent who was recuperating from a hospital stay doesn't sound too likely, unless they were going to care for her, but she doesn't say that. Do you have a link for where the hospital visit was mentioned?
---

Mom2Many - Well, I see William was three years and three months old when he disappeared, so my age guesstimates are wrong. His mother did say he was tall for his age though - perhaps he filled out quite a bit in the three months since his birthday - I thought he looked much the same on his third birthday as in the Spider-Man pic. Yes, perhaps the Spider-Man pic was taken at the previous visit, nine months earlier, for the grandad's funeral visit - I don't know if William was there. Maybe grandma's slippers in the photo were an oversight if it was an old photo - if first the mother had told the police that the nana was in bed, they'd ask her whose slippers were in the photo - so then nana would have to be on the patio, whether she was or not. So the nana might have some reason to say they will 'never stop looking', if she knows she was either still in bed or getting up, and that the photo had been taken nine months earlier.

I agree, not from experiential memory - aren't we meant to say why? Lol - I am not too confident on the specifics, or the correct lingo. I like to wait for someone else to explain it.

mom2many said...

Their grandfather had died and the family was there to look after their grandmother, who they called “Nana”, after she had recently got out of hospital.
http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/nsw/trying-to-dig-up-the-truth-about-william-tyrell-repairman-william-speddings-home-searched-in-the-hunt-for-missing-boy/story-fni0cx12-1227192659824

I've also read somewhere that Grandma was getting ready to move and they were there to assist, so perhaps it didn't matter so much about the house being in order.

I'm not equipped to go on with certainty about why she wasn't speaking from experiential memory. There were lots of confusing reports. Some said no one was outside with William, for however brief a time. Perhaps, in this interview a year later, she just can't bring herself to admit that, so she invents a new sequence of events. Perhaps, the explanation is more sinister. But, then there's the emergency call, which also contains flags. It's very troubling.

Hey Jude said...

I'll browse the search later for 'experiential memory' and see what I can find, but only if no-one helps out in the meantime. :)

lynda said...

OT

Talked to a friend of mine today that lives in Carmel, Indiana. Of course I brought up Crazy Davy. She was shocked. She said the media has portrayed it there in detail as a tragedy, no hint of anything untoward about CD, not a whisper. She also said that on her news, they said that the perps went up to front door and knocked and Amanda answered. Hmmmm..she was truly shocked when I started telling her about his sermons and all the coincidences. Just reaffirmed to me that LE is not going to pursue this further. One can only hope that CD never gets more than 120 followers

lynda said...

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3391678/Feminists-far-right-groups-hold-separate-rallies-Cologne-Merkel-backs-new-powers-expel-migrant-criminals-wave-sex-assaults.html

Anonymous said...

There are obviously lots of similarities between William and Deorr's disappearance - (The age and sex of the children, the remote location away from home, both disappeared on a Friday, the paucity of details around the exact moment of disappearance, conflicting details and timeline, both children were playing when they 'vanished', a grandparent involved, fathers leaving the site for better mobile reception, the description of hearing "nothing" and the list goes on and on) - but I detect in others, and feel myself, a sort of battle weariness that makes close attention to these missing children cases difficult to sustain.

Anonymous said...

Brendan Creato:

http://www.nj.com/camden/index.ssf/2016/01/father_of_boy_found_dead_last_year_taken_into_cust.html#incart_2box_nj-homepage-featured

Anonymous said...

Lonzie Barton:

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2016/01/11/police-say-may-have-found-remains-missing-florida-toddler.html

Anonymous said...


I doubted the tree story as it was reported foster mother was pregnant and the baby due soon and did not believe she would lift a child up at that age. Her father died in February and the Camden Haven Courier withdrew his death notice due to the family names in the notice. Never noticed the house closed off as a crime scene and foster granny went to stay with friends. Any normal person would never have left the house waiting for him to come home. She left her mother a long time without visiting her since the husbands death. Dad and Grannies car should have been photographed in case anyone saw the cars where they should not have been. I thought his sister should have been removed immediately if Police who seem very friendly with family do not know what happened to William.