Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Tiger Woods' Statement


Tiger Woods, professional golfer, was arrested for drunk driving and made a statement useful in analysis.  

Question:  Does he take responsibility as he claims?  Is the sentence, 

"I take full responsibility" the truth?

“I understand the severity of what I did and I take full responsibility for my actions. I want the public to know that alcohol was not involved. What happened was an unexpected reaction to prescribed medications. I didn’t realize the mix of medications had affected me so strongly. I expect more from myself, too. I will do everything in my power to ensure this never happens again,” 

This statement gives insight into his thinking. 

Several years ago, Woods was involved in a divorce scandal where it was publicly learned that he had an unimaginable number of girlfriends and trysts on a daily or weekly basis and that this was his norm. 

To maintain this, he had to commit incessant deception which, itself is stressful, in order to keep his life private from the media, but more challenging, private from his wife. 

This was kept up in a way that indicates habituation of deception as a lifestyle or norm.  

As the brain adapts to the need to deceive, the patterns can become near or at unbreakable levels. 

When his serial infidelity was public, including payouts to girlfriends around the country, Woods blamed "sex addiction" rather than take responsibility for his own behaviors.  

Note:  

Tiger Woods maintained a lifestyle that required incessant daily lying.  As this has its own habituation and desensitization process, it is almost impossible to turn off. 

We see this in his statement above.  

Media reported that Woods was driving a 2015 Mercedes-Benz “erratically, all over the road” when he was stopped, law-enforcement reported. 

Woods grew “arrogant” during the stop and refused to take a Breathalyzer test, which is grounds for an automatic arrest.

Media also reported that his representatives repeatedly called the Jupiter Police Department to find out if the cop was wearing a body camera.  This shows their priority. 

Woods spent 3 ¹/2 hours in the Palm Beach County Jail before being released at 10:50 a.m., according to online booking records.

Jupiter Police Department spokeswoman Kristin Rightler said she didn’t know if the allegations against Woods involved alcohol or drugs and said his arrest report wouldn’t be available at least until Tuesday.




From TMZ: 

Woods’ girlfriend, stylist Kristin Smith, the ex-wife of former Dallas Cowboys safety Gerald Sensabaugh, learned about Woods’ arrest during a phone call she received inside a Neiman-Marcus store in Dallas, TMZ said.
Several shoppers said Smith “went crazy,” saying, “I knew it, I knew it,” the Web site said.
Smith then reportedly began crying, bought $5,000 worth of merchandise and left the store.


Woods became the world’s first billionaire athlete and enjoyed a squeaky-clean reputation until the 2009 personal debacle sparked his fall from grace.

Woods infamously smashed his Cadillac SUV into a fire hydrant and tree in a neighbor’s yard early on the morning after Thanksgiving, sparking a spectacular scandal as it emerged that wife Nordegren had chased him out of their house with a golf club upon confirming his infidelity.

The statement:  Does Woods Take Responsibility?


“I understand the severity of what I did and I take full responsibility for my actions. I want the public to know that alcohol was not involved. What happened was an unexpected reaction to prescribed medications. I didn’t realize the mix of medications had affected me so strongly. I expect more from myself, too. I will do everything in my power to ensure this never happens again,” 

Beginning with the pronoun, "I", the subject is psychologically "in" this statement which indicates that we are likely to find reliable information within the statement, even if the subject is deceptive.  

“I understand the severity of what I did and I take full responsibility for my actions. 

The statement of "full responsibility" is one associated with the opposite.  See prior analysis on "responsibility" in a statement.  

In context we look for a subject to take responsibility rather than one to tell us he is taking responsibility.  

The unnecessary statement is made further weak by the qualifying "full."



I want the public to know that alcohol was not involved. 

This is an interesting statement.  The statement is that he "wants" the public to know something. 

He does not say "alcohol was not involved", which is passive voice, something that is closely associated contextually with deception or distancing in a mea culpa statement. 

He states what he wants the public to know.  In this sense, it is not a direct lie.  He is stating what he wants.  This is an indicator of a pathological liar who has learned, through incessant repetition, how to parse language to avoid a direct lie.  

"alcohol was not involved" avoids saying, "I did not drink alcohol."

What is the purpose of one arrested for this that he wants the public to know that alcohol was not involved? 

If he mixed alcohol and pain killers, he "wants the public to know" that the alcohol was not "involved" in his driving issues.  He may even believe that he was not impacted by alcohol, yet the passivity tells us to the contrary.  

Alcohol would be a personal failure because he would have had to:

Choose to drink it
Choose which drink to purchase
Purchase the drink
Imbibe the drink
and repeat process.  

Passivity Versus Passive Voice 

This is another "statement analysis" expression where passivity often addresses a few words, rather than a theme.  Passivity is used to conceal identity and/or responsibility.  "Rocks were thrown" is an example of the weakness of passivity. 

However, weakness does not, by itself, give us deception.  If the subject does not know who was responsible for the rock throwing, this passivity is "appropriate weakness." 

Passive voice speaks to a theme developing, and we will use this phrase when the passivity continues.  Here we see his next phase is also passive:


What happened was 

When you see this phrase (an event, or "happening") you should notice what is missing:  human activity. 

This is a subtle form of passive voice that seeks to portray the active subject as a victim of events outside of his control.  "What happened was" has no human responsibility within it.  


an unexpected reaction to prescribed medications. 

We now have "prescription medications" introduced to the topic, with "mixing" having no human responsibility.  

This is to say that the "reaction" was "not expected."  

Note:  to whom was this reaction unexpected?

In the sentence, there is no human involved.  

Next, he moves to the rule of the negative, telling us what he did not "realize" rather than "what happened":  


I didn’t realize the mix of medications had affected me so strongly. 

Here is, perhaps, where the deception about alcohol has entered.  He realized that it had affected him (the mix) but he did not realize how "strongly" the effect was. 

This is to tell us of his awareness, howbeit, elevated through the negative. 

Note also that in his mind is the element of time passing.  This is by the word "realize", which means a thought processing action that is not instantaneously.  We may consider time passing as important to him as he recognized an increase in effect ("strongly" also indicates passage of time) and, perhaps, why alcohol entered his statement. 

This is "what happened" to the subject.  He didn't do anything: things happened to him.  

Next, note the incongruence of such:  


I expect more from myself, too. 

What could he possibly expect "more" of?  This was "unexpected" and, in this sense, the fault of the doctors.  


I will do everything in my power to ensure this never happens again,” 

Will he become a chemist to make sure medications do not have this unexpected effect?

Consider the passive voice and now the entrance of "I" with first "expectation" (thought)  and then future action, to be incongruent with what mediations did to him.  

Analysis Conclusion:

Deception Indicated.  

Tiger Woods continues to deceive.  He wants "the public" to know that alcohol was not involved but avoids saying, "I did not drink alcohol", which, given the charges, is unnecessary.  The necessity of arrest comes from being impaired, no matter what caused the impairment. But this is not the area of which I am indicating deception:  it is in the statement, 

"I take full responsibility"  that deception is indicated.  

He does not take responsibility for his actions, but is a victim of chemical reaction. 

This statement is consistent with the police source who reported him as "arrogant", as this statement shows not only low self-awareness, but contempt for his audience.  

He inadvertently insults those who have maintained sobriety from alcohol, while shifting blame to the chemical reaction.  

He takes responsibility for nothing.  What does "nothing" look like?  In his statement, "nothing" is when medications have an unexpected reaction.  

The use of "unexpected", while likely to be seen as an excuse, is very important. The word "unexpected" belies that the subject had an expectation.  This is the language of "narrative building" or, as police say, "story telling." 

With "realization" and "strongly" , the subject tells us of his own intention to become intoxicated.  

Drug and alcohol counselors will, intuitively, recognize that the subject is not at all ready for treatment, even if depression is the underling cause of self medicating.  The subject has "no choice" as there is no central responsibility which means that there is no hope of change of behavioral patterns.  

The subject is a pathological liar, desensitized from a lifetime of lying, he holds, as do all liars,  the world audience in contempt.  He does not recognize how this statement makes him look even as he may seek to re enter professional golf or regain lost endorsement deals.  

This is how lives may spin out of control.  

Personal responsibility, in any situation, allows for hope as it yields control back to the subject who may not put effort into effecting change.  

This is why "victim status" is so personally dangerous and has ruined lives.  Politicians benefit by votes and by appearing "compassionate" but in context, the substance abuse professionals know that as long as it is not their client's fault, there is little hope for change.  

For training in Statement Analysis, please visit TRAINING









20 comments:

Anonymous said...

Interesting that he stated, " I want the public to know that alcohol was not involved."
It is as if he is directly telling us that all involved (his personal medical professionals, his family, pharmacists, Lawyers, etc) know the truth, but he wants us to "know" otherwise. It really speaks to how intelligent he thinks "the public" is and how easily he believes "the public" is manipulated.

-KC

Amyl Nitrite said...

He's got those "sanapaku" eyes. He needs to lay off the "mix" altogether in order to get his life back in order. As it is, he is heading downward and picking up speed as he proceeds.

LC said...

The arresting officer initially pulled him over for erratic driving, but claimed to smell alcohol on his breath. The reports of the arrest now claim the influence of either alcohol or drugs is not specified.
He likely refused the breathalizer test because he knew the results would be officially recorded as positive for alcohol.

rob said...

He refused the breathalyzer cause he knew he would fail it. If you took RX's, you wouldn't be at risk of failing.
Just looking at that picture, he was one drunk a**.
TW is (or at least WAS) a billionaire. Get a driver man. Your golf career is over, move on. Enjoy the fruits of your labor. Quit making an a** of yourself.

Anonymous said...

Remember that he liked to take Ambien and have sex.

tania cadogan said...

Police found Tiger Woods asleep at the wheel on the side of a six-lane Florida road in the dark of morning, the engine running and his right blinker flashing. His speech was slow and slurred, though there was no alcohol in his system and he didn't know how far away he was from home.

The details contained in a police affidavit released Tuesday did little to clear up the curious circumstances of his whereabouts on Memorial Day morning, only to confirm Woods' statement that he had not been drinking before being arrested for suspicion of DUI.

Police described Woods as "cooperative as much as possible," saying he had trouble keeping his eyes open.

The affidavit was released a day after Woods spent nearly four hours in the Palm Beach County jail on a DUI charge. His mug shot from the jail provided a stark illustration of how much Woods' mystique has been shattered since his decade of domination that golf had never seen.

In a statement Monday evening, Woods attributed the arrest to an "unexpected reaction" to prescription medicine.

"I understand the severity of what I did and I take full responsibility for my actions," he said.

Woods has not competed in four months, and he had fusion surgery on his lower back — his fourth back surgery since April 2014 — on April 20 that will keep him off the PGA Tour for at least the rest of the season.

He told police he had taken several prescriptions.

According to an incident report, police described fresh damage to the driver's side of the car — both tires were flat, along with minor damage to the rims. There also was minor damage to the front driver's side bumper and rear bumper, and the passenger rear tail light appeared to be out.

The affidavit said Woods failed a sobriety test on the side of the road because he couldn't keep his balance or follow instructions. At one point, police said Woods appeared to be on the verge of falling over and one officer rushed over to catch him if he had.

Breath tests, however, showed no alcohol in his system. Police said Woods agreed to a urine test.

Wearing black athletic shorts and a white T-shirt, Woods told police he had returned from playing golf in Los Angeles. Woods had said on his website last week that he would not be able to twist his back for three months because of his surgery.

The report said Woods changed his story on where he was coming from and where he was going. His car was parked in a direction headed the opposite way from his home on Jupiter Island.

The affidavit listed four medications, including Vicodin, that Woods reported taking. Vicodin is an opioid pain medication. The other three drugs appear to be misspelled. One is similar in spelling to Solax (a muscle relaxer) or Solox (for acid reflux). Another is similar in spelling to Etorix, a painkiller not currently approved in the United States.

tania cadogan said...

cont.

Painkillers are generally prescribed after such surgeries, and many carry warnings to avoid driving while taking them. Other medicines, including over-the-counter allergy medicine or anti-anxiety medicines, can also cause drowsiness and include warnings about driving.

The FDA warning for Vicodin says it "may impair the mental and/or physical abilities required for the performance of potentially hazardous tasks such as driving a car or operating machinery; patients should be cautioned accordingly."

Woods told police he was recovering from surgery. Before the four back surgeries, Woods had four surgeries on his left knee dating to his freshman year at Stanford in 1994.

The report said Woods was "extremely sleepy," and the officer observed it was hard for Woods to keep his eyes open and to walk. In the incident report filed by the four officers at the scene, Woods kept dozing off even after his initial contact with police.

"I didn't realize the mix of medications had affected me so strongly," Woods said in his statement.

Woods is scheduled to be arraigned July 5 in Palm Beach County on the DUI charge. Police also cited him for improper parking. The report said his Mercedes was parked on the right side of the road with the engine running, the brake lights on and the blinker flashing. He was alone.

Woods has not been seen at a golf tournament since he opened with a 77 at the Omega Dubai Desert Classic in February, withdrawing the next day because of back spasms. He was in Los Angeles for the Genesis Open, run by his Tiger Woods Foundation, but he did not come to the course at Riviera because of his back.

He was at the Masters, but only to attend the dinner for past champions.

Woods has 79 career victories on the PGA Tour, second only to Sam Snead. He has won 14 majors, the last one the U.S. Open in 2008 at Torrey Pines just one week before his fourth knee surgery, which sidelined him for nearly nine months.

Woods, who had been No. 1 longer than any other golfer, has not been a factor since his last victory in August 2013 as he battled through back surgeries from a week before the 2014 Masters until his most recent fusion surgery on his lower back.

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/05/30/woods-found-asleep-at-wheel-no-alcohol-in-his-system.html

Anonymous said...

I never liked Tiger Woods. He always came off as cold, arrogant and aloof and that's before he was caught engaging in extra-marital affairs on an industrial scale.

Now he seems washed up in golf of course. I remember when people were comparing his titles to Roger Federer and saying who would get more in the end. Now Federer is enjoying a renaissance in his career at 36(!) and sits at 18 majors compared to I believe 14 majors for Woods.

I think in terms of their private lives, there couldn't have been a greater contrast between Federer and Woods, but also in terms of their demeanor as well.
Now, I'll admit my bias here as I greatly admire Federer as a sportsman and a person for his seeming humility, but I think he's a good example to people on how to act humbly and how to conduct your private life compared with the cold attitude that Woods showed, even before his public fall from grace.

The best defence you can say for Woods, is that his lying at least isn't as bad as say Lance Armstrong, whose lying has caused untold damage to his critics who were simply speaking the truth. It's not the best defence, but it's the best he's got.

PS - I'm not completely naïve to think that maybe Federer could be very different in person, but I can't help but like the guy. I'm also not naïve enough to completely dismiss the notion that he, like others on the tennis circuit are completely clean of drug use, particularly given his most recent surge, HOWEVER, I would still like to think he's clean and his recent success is mostly due to his once in a lifetime talent and hard work.

Anonymous said...

Tiger Woods is just so unattractive (he looks exactly like his very unattractive Cambodian mother) & he is NOT SEXY INSIDE OR OUT. He gets shitloads of money for hitting a ball into holes. Whoopee!!!! It's amazing he can get laid by so many. There are other rich men...why go for him? He looks like his Cambodian mother.

Newbie said...

" I want the public to know that alcohol was not involved. What happened was an unexpected reaction to prescribed medications. I didn’t realize the mix of medications had affected me so strongly."

Translation: "I mixed the new Dunkin Donuts energy punch with Tylenol for my back pain."

How am I doing as far as picking up on leakage?

Anonymous said...

I wonder what he was on that he was driving the Mercedes erratically all over the road? Hmmmm. Maybe pot? Coke? He looks like he's doing some hardcore drugs in that photo...maybe qualudes?

Anonymous said...

He looks like he hasnt shaved in days, droopy eyelids, depressed look...maybe withdrawing from crack??? Looks like he's coming down off coke or crack...also the driving erratically all over road....that doesnt really sound like booze.

Anonymous said...

Wonder why it took him so long to get bailed out? Maybe he passed out and had a nap? Of girlfriend was so sick of him cheating on her with everything that moves, she said screw you you can rot in jail?

Linda Lazo said...

Habitual liars create their own karma. And here you have it.

Linda Lazo said...

Habitual liars create their own karma. And here you have it.

Linnette said...

So, he was telling the truth re alcohol, then. Strange how SA said he was lying. He is a nasty man either way.

Anonymous said...

10:30 AM PT -- Law enforcement sources tell TMZ ... cops spotted Woods "driving erratically, all over the road" when they pulled him over. We're told the officer smelled alcohol on Woods' breath and at that point Woods became "arrogant." We're told the officer asked him to blow into a breathalyzer but he refused. In Florida that means automatic arrest and license suspension.




Peter Hyatt said...

Linnette,

here is the conclusion, or you can re-read the article itself. I was specific.

Peter

Analysis Conclusion:

Deception Indicated.

Tiger Woods continues to deceive. He wants "the public" to know that alcohol was not involved but avoids saying, "I did not drink alcohol", which, given the charges, is unnecessary. The necessity of arrest comes from being impaired, no matter what caused the impairment. But this is not the area of which I am indicating deception: it is in the statement,

"I take full responsibility" that deception is indicated.

He does not take responsibility for his actions, but is a victim of chemical reaction.

Linnette said...

Thank you for answering. I misunderstood your analysis, it seems. I took it as you thought he was not denying that he had drunk alcohol. English is my third language, and I sometimes struggle with subtlety and nuances.

Trigger said...

Tiger Woods' behavior is so out of control.

Sexual addictions, drugs, a failed marriage, a failing career, excuses, lies, and a tarnished image. Where will this trail of chaos and pain take Mr. Woos next?