Thursday, October 12, 2017

Baby Caliyah 911 Call



Order speaks to priority. 

In a 911 call, it is similar to "excited utterance" where the expectation is that emotion will cause someone to speak freely to that which is most important to the subject. 

What the mother says initially is her priority.  It is what is most important to her. 

Q.  What is most important to the mother in this 911 call?

Q.  How many things can you name before the mother reports the baby missing?

Q.  Does the mother report her baby missing?

Listen to the 911 call made by Caliyah’s mother.

To be trained in Statement Analysis, visit Hyatt Analysis Services.

We train Law Enforcement, businesses, therapists, writers, and other professionals who rely upon 100% success rate in discerning deception.

Besides seminars,

You may study at home, at your own pace, with 12 months of e support.

We also instruct in Employment Analysis, Psycho-Linguistic profiling, Anonymous Author Identification and Ransom note analysis.

New courses expected in 2018.  
Audio Player

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

Here is a story with missing time and information is important.

Most Important: The caller starts with her alibi of being asleep. Asleep on the couch.

Things Before Caller Reports Baby Missing: Some of her words are unclear, she is talking too fast. No necessarily order: 1) I just woke up 2) I was sleeping on the couch 3) Something about someone else on the couch 4) My two week old is not in her sleeper. 5) Her blanket is gone and her paccy is on the floor 6) I have a 2 year old and 2 week old

Missing: Caller uses the word "gone" after listing the 5 items above first. The dispatcher does well by using the word "gone," repeating back several times the caller's terminology.
The caller never uses the word missing. Even when the dispatcher finally questions her by introducing a new word by asking "the only thing missing is the baby and the blanket?" to which the caller agrees but does not repeat the word missing, or use the word gone. The caller never uses the word missing.

She has the 2 year old check on the 2 week old and is told by the 2 year old the baby is missing.

While the mother knows nothing else, she is 100% confident there is nothing missing but the baby and the blanket.

The father is out walking around the park looking for her.

The caller calls out the baby's name as if she will get a response?

Missing info = More to this story than meets the eye. The detectives on the scene will get some good info from her if she doesn't call a lawyer first.

GetThem

Anonymous said...

She (the mother) is lucky she's not "gone."
Did you see that guy? Prior to this arrest-long beofre the tats on the neck that scream "I'll cut your throat for a quarter"-he had three teardrops around his left eye.

She might be lucky to get locked up!

Anonymous said...

Why do most missing children have names that have some cpmbination of the same letters...like Ayla, Caliyah, and there have at least 5 or 6 other cases on here with names containing the a, y, l, i h, combinations. Has anyone ever noticed that? Wasnt one of the names "Aliyah" or something like that?

Peter Hyatt said...

Anonymous said...
Why do most missing children have names that have some cpmbination of the same letters...like Ayla, Caliyah, and there have at least 5 or 6 other cases on here with names containing the a, y, l, i h, combinations. Has anyone ever noticed that? Wasnt one of the names "Aliyah" or something like that?
October 13, 2017 at 1:35 AM


Some create novelty names because the child is a novelty item in the house to show off to others.

It speaks to attitude towards the child.

This is not true in all cases, but it was first told me in 2002 and the years I spent in child abuse have affirmed it.

Peter

Peter Hyatt said...

PS:

the person who originally told me this also said that delivery room nurses would place bets, based upon the child's name, which would have social services called in for intervention.

From there, I did my own research, including asking nurses at hospitals. I found that in some way, they all embraced this, whether in conversation, or joke, or actual bet.

Peter

dadgum said...

The more I think about what this says about us as a society, the more heartbreaking it is. I hear the comments about naming children for success, and there is validity in them. I have wondered about this very 'name issue', as the names are not common, nor regional...yet over represented in abuse cases. So interesting, and so sad...