Sunday, February 11, 2018

Jordyn Dumont: 911 Call Repost



3 year old Jordyn Dumont died, according to the autopsy, of blunt

 force trauma. William Joseph McCullen was arrested 1 day after 

making this call. 

Although the call is short, it is useful.

  




The analysis is of an emergency call in which the caller's words 

are placed into a category of expectation: 

We expect the caller to facilitate the flow of information in order to 

located the "missing" child. 

Let's listen to his words: 


Operator:  911 where is your emergency?

Caller:   "Yes ma'am . My oldest daughter, I was taking a nap, I just


 woke up & I can't find her anywhere."

The question is "Where is your emergency?" which speaks to 

location. 

Callers in distress may or may not answer this immediately.  Those

who do not skip the question about location and go right into 

the priority:  Missing child.

"Excited Utterance"

Where one begins is to show priority. 

What does this short, one statement response tell us?

Listen to what he tells you. 


Consider what he has told us and what his priorities are:  



1.  "Yes, ma'am"  begins with politeness.  Politeness in a dire 

emergency is not what we "expect", formally,  as we measure our 

expectations

against what is given to us.  To be polite is "ingratiating" oneself

to whom?  To authorities.  


2.  The location is not given.  


This, itself, cannot become a conclusion as some callers will 

prioritize without listening:  let me tell you what is first and 

foremost on my mind:  my missing daughter!  We flag this as 

'avoidance' but, in context of a missing child, we do not give it 

a very high or weighty importance to it.  It could be argued that he 

is so concentrated on his daughter, that he skipped this information.  We still, however, flag the question about location as "sensitive" because he did not answer the question.  


3.  "My oldest daughter" tells us

a.  the daughter is his ("my") giving relationship.

b.  he has at least another daughter 

c.  the other daughter (s) is younger 


But here, he stops himself.  This is "self-censoring" and is an 

indication that he is not only beginning this call with the need

to be seen as favorably by the police (ingratiating) but he is 

withholding (even suppressing) critical information in the context

of a missing child.

d.  His oldest daughter does not have a name. Although the possessive pronoun is here, her name is not.  This is his initial call to the police and they do not know who she is.  


4.  "I was taking a nap" is to supplant "my daughter" from the 

priority of the call. 


"I" is now before the concern for the child. 


5.  "...taking a nap" is akin to not only shifting priority and attention

away from child and towards self, it suggests alibi building.  

Whatever happened to her, you can't think I did it because I was 

taking a nap. This priority is seen in that he chooses to yield this 
information before he reports about Jordyn. 

6.  "I just woke up"  is unnecessary information.  If he was napping

he was asleep.  

Unnecessary information is very important for us and he now gives 
us the question:

"If you were not asleep, what were you doing?"

We might not have thought to ask him what he was doing had he himself not provoked this question.  This is what deceptive people often do:  they think they are pre-empting questions when they are, in fact, teaching us what questions need to be asked. 

This caller has a need to convince ("need to persuade") police that he was asleep, suggesting that he was not asleep.  He has a need, as an alibi, to convince them that he could not be responsible because he was taking a nap.  With this additional and unnecessary information, he is said to likely be doing something other than taking a nap. 

He literally plants the seed of doubt, himself, into the audience. 

7.  "I can't find her anywhere."

Since he cannot find her "anywhere", she cannot be found.  Since she cannot be found "anywhere", why bother to search for her?  This is not a desperate father wanting his daughter found.  

His priority comes from his words:

1.  That you, the police, view me, the father,  in a positive light. 
2.  That you, the police, understand, I have to withhold information from you. (self censoring) 

3.  That you, the police know that whatever it is you find out, it wasn't me that caused it because I was napping.

4.  That you, the police, if you doubt I was napping, you must understand that I had to be napping because I just woke up.  

5.  Since I just woke up, I have not wasted any time.  

(Analysts:  this is, in a sense, a black hole or temporal lacunae of time passing by that he jumps over).  

6.  That a child is missing is only 6th in my priority.  It is very low in importance.  This is why we do not necessarily flag someone who answers/does not answer the location question.  Some innocent callers have the wherewithal to give the location immediately yet will not break off the statement and go right to the missing child.  

7.  that you, police understand that I am a 'good guy' who wasted no time and have looked for her everywhere.  This is the "Ingratiating" factor. 

We saw this with DeOrr Kunz who lavishly praised authorities for not finding his son.  


To learn Statement Analysis, contact Hyatt Analysis Services for training.  

Our training is for law enforcement and non law enforcement.  It is done in seminar form and our Complete Statement Analysis is done at your home, generally in under 12 months. 

The expectation is 100% accuracy in lie detection.  

25 comments:

General P. Malaise said...

if he just woke up how did he search everywhere?

Anonymous said...

DeOrr Kunz's missing child was a boy and as far as I can tell he has not been charged with his murder.

Anonymous said...

Peter, can you post some truthful 911 calls for comparison some day? I'm sure your analysis would be just as helpful. Great work always.

Anonymous said...

(Off topic)

Some of you may find these interesting: a couple of anonymous death threat letters received by a British politician and some campaign donors last week, one with a handwritten envelope:
https://twitter.com/andrealeadsom/status/963016238413893632/photo/1?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Forder-order.com%2F
https://order-order.com/2018/02/09/least-6-leave-donors-received-identical-death-threats-week/

Peter Hyatt said...

Start w Google search of 911 calls. Media doesn’t post a lot of them due to low interest. They post those of which they know the public is interested.

I think there is a few here on blog too.

Peter Hyatt said...

PS: The 911 call of the police murder is up.

Anonymous said...

https://www.cincinnati.com/videos/news/2018/02/10/audio-911-call-westerville-residence/110309576/

Anonymous said...

https://www.cnn.com/2018/02/10/us/ohio-police-officers-killed/index.html

ima.grandma said...

Actor Jeremy London was taken into custody by the authorities after accusations of domestic violence! The arrest took place following a frantic 911 call made by the man’s wife Juliet in which she claimed  Jeremy was yelling at her while dragging her with his car.

‘Hi, I am having a domestic at my house. My husband is going to take the car right now. He is yelling and screaming at me. He pulled out of the driveway while I was holding onto the car and I hurt my leg and arm. I need someone to come here,’ the upset sounding Juliet said on the phone.

Thoughts?

General P. Malaise said...

‘Hi, I am having a domestic at my house. My husband is going to take the car right now. He is yelling and screaming at me. He pulled out of the driveway while I was holding onto the car and I hurt my leg and arm. I need someone to come here,’ the upset sounding Juliet said on the phone.

1) the emergency is not stated.
2) the call starts with a greeting. not usually expected in an emergency.
3) she does put herself in the scene with the pronoun "I". which indicates we should find veracity in the statement.
4) vague and passive start to the call. is the "domestic" and illegal or a maid service?
5) "I am having.." we should believe her. she is having this and possibly no one else.
6) ""my" house. distancing from her husband, not "our" house..
7) "my husband" not a proper introduction. missing his name. but taking ownership of him.
8) "my husband is going to take the car right now" here she introduces the element of time with the intent of going to take. indicating that the car or her husband have not left as of this point in time.
9) "he is yelling and screaming at me" this may well be true. note this is present tense.
10) "He pulled out of the driveway while I was holding onto the car and I hurt my leg and arm." this is past tense. previously she stated he was "going to take the car" not that he "took" the car. out of sequence unless happening in real time but the tenses negate that. so appears to be deception.
"I need someone to come here." again vague and passive. who is someone she needs, ambulance/police? this is distancing language.

CONCLUSION: deception indicated, narrative building as seen in the verb tenses. (with a large caveat, one needs the entire call to be conclusive). if there is more to the call it could change the conclusion. but from these lines it looks as like a false claim. she does not say her husband was being violent and does not even use the term violent or abusive or other such language to indicate assault, it could even be her who is violent and or abusive.

Anonymous said...

Ot

http://www.13wmaz.com/mobile/article/news/local/parents-frantically-searching-for-missing-jacksonville-teen/93-517842291

PARENTS FRANTICALLY SEARCHING FOR MISSING JACKSONVILLE TEEN

13-year-old Kyleigh Koster believed to have left her home to search for her biological mother


MENU PARENTS FRANTICALLY SEARCHING FOR MISSING JACKSONVILLE TEEN

67°





LOCAL
PARENTS FRANTICALLY SEARCHING FOR MISSING JACKSONVILLE TEEN
Author:
First Coast News
Published:
12:57 PM EST February 12, 2018



The Jacksonville Sheriff's Office is currently searching for a missing teen from Jacksonville, Fla.

Police have listed 13-year-old Kyleigh Koster has a runaway.

According to police, Koster's parents reported the teen missing Sunday from their Mandarin home.

The teen's father stated he had last seen his daughter in her in bed on february 10

He told police he had found her pajamas on the bed and her pillows stuffed under her sheet to imitate her body. He also found her window opened up slightly.

Police say this is the first time she has run away, but she is an adopted child.

Koster's father stated his daughter had frequently talked about "prostitution" and asked him if they live a good life, referring to prostitutes.

He also said that he found Google searches on her computer stating "how to find a john" and "what is a pimp."

The father had said that the victims' biological mother had been referred to by the victim as being a prostitute before.

If you have any information regarding this case, please contact police immediately.



13-year-old Kyleigh Koster believed to have left her home to search for her biological mother

http://www.missingpersonsofamerica.com/2018/02/12/13-year-old-kyleigh-koster-search-for-biological-mother/

ima.grandma said...

I agree General, especially #10. Common sense tells us there had been an integral 'domestic' event leading up to the reason she now calls. "He pulled out of the driveway while I was holding onto the car and I hurt my leg and arm." Is she admitting she was actively participating in escalating the 'domestic' with her use of 'I' twice in the sentence?

I read this opinion the other day when Alex posted a link and comment re: the 911 call of a woman using her words possibly indicating she had participated in the same domestic abuse she was accusing her male partner of committing.

http://www.returnofkings.com/152886/10-things-i-learned-working-as-a-male-domestic-violence-counselor
Snip
Men are presumed guilty and almost always arrested after the accusation is made. The arrest is based upon the accusation, not on evidence. Police will still do an investigation, but an arrest for males is almost guaranteed after a complaint is made. If the female victim claims abuse in her statement, then almost always the male is going to jail.

A man must then prove himself innocent either to the prosecutor or to the judge in a trial, not usually to the police. There doesn’t need to be any evidence to arrest a man, just an accusation.

If a woman is charged with domestic violence, the police often do more of a thorough investigation or there is overwhelming evidence to support that the woman is a perpetrator. However, what often happens is the woman will claim self-defense and her accusation will cause the man to be arrested, even if the man was the one who was the victim of the assault. 

Many men charged with a domestic charge never laid hands on a woman or caused any bodily harm. A threat or act of violence such as punching your hand in the wall or destroying your own property in front of a woman is grounds to be arrested. More @link provided

ima.grandma said...

One more comment and then I'll back out of this one.

Most people (men and women) have no idea of what true and life-altering domestic abuse is. Anyone, anyone! who is involved in a physically violent abusive situation would immediately run to close and lock the door after their abuser leaves the house. Traumatized, anyone would hide in a safe place and pray the perpetrator would never return. She would certainly not run after him! The desperate need for safety is the only instinct available to the mind at that point.

General P. Malaise said...

Blogger ima.grandma said...

in effect "he left" this maybe the reason for the call.

ima.grandma said...

Famous last words 'I'll back out' But...

General, you nailed it!

Hypothetically: She abusively uses manipulative demand techniques to ensure that things go her way or no way, leaving him with no other options other than to acquiesce and leave. (he's been through this before; he knows it won't go away until he does)

But...that's not going to work for her. She needs to continue her out-of-control outburst until she gains declarative power over him. She will NOT allow him to leave her alone, stuck with her abusive maniacal thoughts cycling through her headspace with no physical target for aim.

Anonymous said...

In another 911 analysis, it is stated:

"Note he calls her "my wife" taking possessiveness with her title. A full social introduction is not expected during a rushed call."

Yet, here: His oldest daughter does not have a name. Although the possessive pronoun is here, her name is not. This is his initial call to the police and they do not know who she is.

ima.grandma said...

Anon@ 6:04 is questioning consistency in SA analysis. 

In another 911 analysis, it is stated:

Note he calls her "my wife" taking possessiveness with her title. A full social introduction is not expected during a rushed call.  

You disregarded and omitted the following sentence in the referenced article:   
"We will, however, see if he either:"

A.  Works with the operator for the flow of information or
B.  Works against the operator to hinder the flow of information 
Here, the caller chooses A. He works with the operator for the flow of information

Yet, here: His oldest daughter does not have a name. Although the possessive pronoun is here, her name is not. This is his initial call to the police and they do not know who she is.

"I" is now before the concern for the child. 

Yet, here: The caller chooses  B. and works against the operator to hinder the flow of information.

SA Principle: Context is vital. 

Anonymous said...

Yes, the 911 clearly tells the fate of the lost child within seconds. Alibi building, politeness, and no name ownership. How sad. I don't recall this one being on the blog.

OT
Ima and General must be married and actively abuse each other after reading their posts above.

One adds that the woman stated the abusive husband was taking the car and she held on was injured. another post omits that statement. Here it is:

Hi, I am having a domestic at my house. My husband is going to take the car right now. He is yelling and screaming at me. He pulled out of the driveway while I was holding onto the car and I hurt my leg and arm. I need someone to come here,’ the upset sounding Juliet said on the phone.""

I agree General, especially #10. Common sense tells us there had been an integral 'domestic' event leading up to the reason she now calls. "He pulled out of the driveway while I was holding onto the car and I hurt my leg and arm." Is she admitting she was actively participating in escalating the 'domestic' with her use of 'I' twice in the sentence?""

Neither considered the yelling and screaming may have started in the car and the man accused of abuse was taking off after who knows what threat while she was exiting the car-hence, the injuries to arm and legs.

Either way, the proof is in the puddin' as the saying goes.....he gunned down two police officers.

It would be nifty if the wife went to prison for his gunning down two police officers, eh?

It's contextual I assume.

And, all the while knowing how that saga ended.......um,um,um...OMG!

Anonymous said...

And, who in the heck would allow their spouse to aim a pistol with a laser on it at theri breasts and let them get by with it by merely calling them an idiot? another idiot, that's who.

Anonymous said...

SA principle: "Context is vital."

That's not a principle, it's a maxim, and a vague one at that.

A. Works with the operator for the flow of information or
B. Works against the operator to hinder the flow of information
Here, the caller chooses A. He works with the operator for the flow of information


I agree reaching a conclusion based on either A or B would constitute use of a principle. But saying sometimes saying the victim's name should be expected and sometimes not, it depends on extraneous things, is not a principle. Maybe there is one to be verbalized, but "context is vital" does not clarify what the distinction is.

I disagree in the first example that he is keeping the flow of information going. He keeps repeating the same exact lines over and over. "She's not breathing" is the 6th thing he tells us, well after "I found her." The caller tells us he knows CPR but dispatch has to repeatedly tell him to start doing it before he will. The analysis is rife with contradictions compared to others. It claims "the investigation did not show foul play" even though multiple medical examiners declared it a homicide as a result of a severe beating, not a fall down stairs.

Anonymous said...

There is nothing remotely objective or accurate about the use of SA in these disgusting discussions which make outrageous conjectures against people. These aren’t just characters in a mystery game, and check out Peter’s “accuracy” stats.

Comical.

General P. Malaise said...

Anonymous Anonymous said...
There is nothing remotely ..



yet here you are.

Lucia D said...

My thought is, what fool holds onto a car that is in motion? One who wants to be injured, that's who. One who is trying to create domestic violence.

Peter Hyatt said...

Anonymous said...
In another 911 analysis, it is stated:

"Note he calls her "my wife" taking possessiveness with her title. A full social introduction is not expected during a rushed call."

Yet, here: His oldest daughter does not have a name. Although the possessive pronoun is here, her name is not. This is his initial call to the police and they do not know who she is.
February 12, 2018 at 6:04 PM


Answer: context.

Peter

Volley said...

Anonymous Anonymous said...
DeOrr Kunz's missing child was a boy and as far as I can tell he has not been charged with his murder.

February 11, 2018 at 2:16 PM Delete



Casey Anthony was innocent of killing Caylee.

Lefty anger at something else?