Wednesday, May 29, 2019

911: Police Officer Shoots Male in 'Wrong Apartment'

Dallas police officer Officer Amber Guyger returning home from work shot and killed her neighbor, Botham Jean, after she said she mistook his apartment for her own, in September of 2018. 

 He was taken to a hospital and pronounced dead.

The following is her 911 call with specific Analytical Questions seeking answers within the words used.

Analytical Questions:

    Is the subject reliably reporting what happened?  
    Did the subject  shoot the victim believing he was an intruder in her own apartment?     
   
Within this case, there are questions to be answered but we restrict our analysis to the issue of whether or not the subject is truthful about the wrong apartment. 
Below is the 911 call, with analysis to follow. 


C: get up, man.  



D: Dallas 911. This is Carla. What is your emergency?

C: Hi. This is an off duty officer. . .um. . . can I get. . .I need EMS. . .um… um I’m in number. . 
.um



D: What’s your address?
C: um

D: Do you need police as well or just EMS
C: Yes. Ineed both.

D: Okay, what’s the address?

C: Fuck. I’m at apartment number 1478. I’m in1478


D: And what’s the address there?
C: Um.. .it’s 1210 South Lamar. . . 1478. . .yes

D: What’s going on?



C: I’m an off duty officer. I thought I was in my apartment and I shot a guy thinking that he was. . . thinking it was my apartment.





D: You shot someone?

C: Yes, I thought it was my apartment. I’m fucked. Oh my god. I’m sorry.


D: Okay and where are you at right now?

C: I’m in uh. . .What do you mean? I’m inside the apartment with him. Hey, come on, man.


D: What’s your name?

C: I’m Amber Guyger. I need . . get me. . .I’m . . I’m in



D: Okay we havehelp on the way.


C: I know, but I’m. .I’m gonna lose my job.I thought it was my apartment. Hey, man. Fuck





D: Okay stay with me, okay?

C: I am. I am. I need. I know I needa supervisor. Hey, bud. Hey, bud. Come on. Fuck. I thought it was my apartment.



D: I understand. We have help on the way, okay?

C: I thought it was my apartment. Hurry, please.

D: They are on their way.

C: I need. . .I. . .Ithought it was my apartment. I thoughtit was my apartment. I could have sworn I parked on the third floor.



D: Okay I understand.

C: No. I thought it was my apartment. I thought it was my apartment. I thought it was my apartment. I thought it was my apartment.




D: What’s the gate code there?
C: I don’t know. I don’t know.
D: You don’t know? Okay
C: [Unintelligible.] I thought it was my apartment.

D: They’re trying to get in there. We have an officer there. You don’t know the gate code?
C: No. I thought it was my apartment. I thought it was my apartment.

D: Okay and what floor are you in right now?
C: On the fourth floor. Fourth.Hey, bud. Hey, bud. They’re coming. 
They’re coming. I’m sorry man.




D: Okay, where was he shot?
C: He’s on the top, top left.

(Long pause)

D: Okay you’re with Dallas PD, right?

C: Yes. . . . Oh, my god. I’m done. I didn’t mean to. . I didn’t mean to. . I didn’t mean to. . I’m so sorry. Hey, bud.

D: They’re trying to get to you, okay.

C: I know. Stay with me bud.. . Oh, my god.

D: Okay they’re almost there. They’re already there, they tried to get to you.

C: I thought it was my apartment. I thought it was my apartment. Holy fuck. I thought it was my apartment. Oh my god. I thought it was my apartment. I’m so sorry. I’m so sorry. [unintelligible] Oh my god.

D: Okay, they’re trying to get there to you. Do you hear them? Do you see them? 

C: No. . .no. . I . . I. . how the fuck did I put the. . how did I . . I’m so tired. Hurry. Hey! Over here, over here.

D: Go ahead and talk to them.

C: No, it’s me. I’m off duty. I’m off duty. I fucked. I thought they were in my apartment. I thought this was my floor.  


Did the subject reliably report what happened?
Did she shoot him believing she was in her own apartment? 


Statement Analysis to follow...

For information on training, please visit Hyatt Analysis Services, as well as examples on You Tube and here at the Statement Analysis blog. 

49 comments:

Marianne said...

She is fucked, I'll give her that.
She is not telling the truth.

General P. Malaise said...

Marianne said...
She is fucked, I'll give her that.
She is not telling the truth.


I agree with your first line. regarding your second line, can you point out where she is not telling the truth?

Mike Dammann said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Mike Dammann said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
General P. Malaise said...

Blogger Mike Dammann said...
DECEPTION INDICATED
Deception indicated in reason given to the operator.

will you hang your hat on that? do you think she was in the incorrect apartment by mistake or not?

CQuinn said...

This was really difficult to listen to, so I'm glad Statement Analysis relies on just the words and not the audio. Agree with the above commenter in that she is much more concerned about herself than the victim, and she repeatedly asks for help for herself with little help asked for the victim. I'm not sure I can totally connect that to saying that she's being deceptive in her reason for shooting him. I wonder if she just has no regard for him as a person, but still thought she was in the wrong apartment. The repetition of "I thought it was my apartment" definitely makes it sensitive.
I probably contaminated myself by listening to the audio.

General P. Malaise said...

being self centered and solely concerned with the consequences to oneself does not make a person deceptive.

"I thought I was in my apartment" is super sensitive to her. the question is is sensitivity always deception? no it is not and can be appropriate. context is always important.

Marianne said...

She didn't think she was in the wrong appartement. That is the lie.

General P. Malaise said...

Anonymous Marianne said...
She didn't think she was in the wrong appartement. That is the lie.

please explain how you get to that conclusion.

Hootie said...

Is the subject reliably reporting what happened?

Yes.


Did the subject shoot the victim believing he was an intruder in her own apartment?

Yes.

RDB said...

Is the last quote a mistype or did she really say, "I thought they were in my apartment"? Who is "they"? Was there a witness? Or would this be her distancing herself from the victim?

General P. Malaise said...

Anonymous RDB said...

she is most likely responding to a question we do not hear, it appears she is talking to the police officer who responded to the call.

Tania Cadogan said...

off topic

Investigators found a body Wednesday in the search for a missing 5-year-old Utah girl after her uncle, who is charged in her murder, provided a map to her remains, police said Wednesday.

The body turned up less than a block from her home, Logan Police Chief Gary Jensen said, adding that investigators were working to confirm the remains were Elizabeth "Lizzy" Shelley.

Hours earlier, Alex Whipple, 21, was charged in her death. He and revealed her location after prosecutors agreed not to seek the death penalty against him, Logan Police Chief Gary Jensen said.

Shelley was reported missing Saturday from her home in Logan, a city about 80 north of Salt Lake City. She was found under trees and brush.

"There are not words to express the sadness and heartbreak we feel today," a statement read by a victim's advocate on behalf of the girl's mother, Jessica Whipple, said. "This did not end the way we wanted to do but in the sadness we are comforted by the effort people put in to find Lizzy. We would never have expected this outpouring of love and support. It was beautiful."

Jensen said the discovery at least would give "closure and helps us be able to now deal with the investigation and help the family through their grief."

Investigators said they connected Whipple to the murder from blood found on his sweatshirt, wristwatch and handprint on a PVC pipe.

A broken knife that was taken from the Shelley family's kitchen also was found and a teal skirt the girl was last seen wearing had been buried nearby, police added.

Whipple "knows he did something that's inexcusable," defense attorney Shannon Demler said. "He wanted at least the family to know ... she had passed away so that they could get some kind of closure."

Demler led police to the body.

Prosecutors have charged Whipple with aggravated murder, child kidnapping, obstruction of justice and desecration of a human body, a charge related to steps taken to hide the remains.

Investigators began searching for the girl after her mother reported her bed empty and the front door open Saturday morning. Whipple, who slept on the couch after drinking at night with his sister and her boyfriend, also had been missing.

"I would never, ever in a million years have thought he was capable of harming such a cute little girl," said Bill Whipple, Alex Whipple's grandfather. "I knew he was a thief, but I never labeled him as a murderer."

Officers scoured the area looking for the girl, combing through garbage, while dive teams searched various bodies of water.

The younger Whipple was found in a rural area about 10 miles from the family's home. He was combative and had a baseball bat and drug paraphernalia on him, police said. During questioning, he told police alcohol made him "black out" and initially denied having gone to his sister's house the night before his niece disappeared.

Police said they have not discovered a potential motive for the killing.

“We don’t understand at this point where that might be," Jensen said.

Whipple has a criminal record for a 2016 assault, possession of a stolen car and drug-related arrests.

He is scheduled to appear in court Monday.

https://www.foxnews.com/us/utah-girl-elizabeth-shelley-body-uncle-map

Olivia said...

Yes, she is telling the truth.

Her linguistics indicate veracity.

Unknown said...

I agree. "They" is staying with me.
She never expressed "they" to the operator but when the officers show up she stated "they" to the officers.

Hey Jude said...

C: I’m an off duty officer. I thought I was in my apartment and I shot a guy thinking that he was. . . thinking it was my apartment.

The change from past to present tense may indicate that the caller is not using experiential memory, or that she is traumatised because she somehow accidentally shot an innocent man in his own home. She does not complete what she was thinking about the man, which may be due to reluctance to tell a direct lie about him. When she changes what she says she was thinking, to make it about her apartment rather than the man, she is able to complete the sentence.

She does not say she thought he was in her apartment.

D: You shot someone?

C: Yes, I thought it was my apartment. I’m fucked. Oh my god. I’m sorry.

Again she avoids saying she thought the man she shot was in her apartment. She calls upon divinity, and apologises, which in a 911 call is sensitive. It would be very sensitive to a police officer, if
she had accidentally shot someone off duty, in their own home, so I don’t know if, or by how much, it might be necessary to reduce the sensitivity?

D: Okay and where are you at right now?

C: I’m in uh. . .What do you mean? I’m inside the apartment with him. Hey, come on, man.

The caller is reluctant to say where she is, and answers a question with a question, which heightens the sensitivity of the question to her. Again though, it would be extremely sensitive if it was a genuine mistake.

“The apartment”, is neither his nor hers - why does she not say it is his apartment, as she knows it is not hers? Is it because she was genuinely confused as to whose apartment it was, or is it because it is now just “the apartment” rather than his apartment, as she knows he’ll no longer be living there?

D: Okay I understand.

C: No. I thought it was my apartment. I thought it was my apartment. I thought it was my apartment. I thought it was my apartment.

“No” is to contradict the operator - the caller is not satisfied that the operator, who has twice said, “I understand” really understands. The need to persuade is strong, and the continual repetition makes the question of whether she thought the apartment was hers, highly sensitive.

C: I thought it was my apartment. I thought it was my apartment. Holy fuck. I thought it was my apartment. Oh my god. I thought it was my apartment. I’m so sorry. I’m so sorry. [unintelligible] Oh my god.

The caller uses irreverent language whilst also calling upon divinity. She may be fearing of a godlike power, but one other than God? “Sorry” is repeated, and may indicate guilt, yet guilt would not be unexpected in an accidental shooting.

C: I need. . .I. . .Ithought it was my apartment. I thoughtit was my apartment. I could have sworn I parked on the third floor.

“I could have sworn” is not to say, “I parked on the third floor - I know I parked on the third floor”, which, if one believed they
had parked on the third floor, they would be more likely say?

“I could have sworn” is past tense, but as the event is current, “I swear I parked on the third floor” might be more expected. “Swearing” is sensitive, too, as swearing belies a need for outside reinforcement of one’s words.

C: No, it’s me. I’m off duty. I’m off duty. I fucked. I thought they were in my apartment. I thought this was my floor.  

Elsewhere the caller has referred to the victim as “he”, but here she avoids saying “he” - yet there was no “they” to have thought about. She avoids telling a direct lie about the man, yet nowhere does she say she thought HE was in HER apartment.

Hey Jude said...

The caller doesn’t report what happened, except that she shot a guy. The rest is about what she was thinking - yet it should be she had no time to think anything if she managed to shoot someone so fast as to have not even had time to notice the door and furnishings were not hers, despite stepping inside.

Hey Jude said...

Come to think of it, she never says it was accidental, or a mistake. She shot him because “I thought it was my apartment” - she doesn’t say she thought HE was IN her apartment. If she can’t say it....

Olivia said...

Amateurs...

Recall Peter’s very instrumental teaching.

How would YOU say it?

If I accidentally shot someone because I thought it was my apartment they were in, (notice I wrote “they” even though I am only referring to one person), you are damn right I would say “I thought it was my apartment, I thought it was my apartment” over and over again.

Hopefully someday you people will heed Peter’s guidance well enough to be able to analyze critical statements.

Right now, you people cannot recognize a truthful denial.

Sad.

Leigh said...

If I enter into her linguistic reality, I am a police officer. I am a police officer even when I'm off duty. After ending my shift, I exit the elevator on the wrong floor, open my door and there is an intruder. I react as an armed officer with deadly force. Realizing I'm in the wrong apartment sends me into a tailspin. I call 911-a coworker-and vacillate between on duty police officer who shot someone (I need my supervisor), and civilian who realizes "I'm f*cked." She shows guilty caller status with the "I'm sorry's" , repetition of "I thought I was in my apartment" , and calling upon deity. She shows that because she is a guilty caller--or, her civilian self is. When she sounds colder towards the victim, that may be due to her training as an officer. Most police officers keep their cool in stressful situations and distance themselves emotionally for self preservation. I don't expect her to sound out of control in her 911 call. I believe her that the shooting was accidental.

Leigh

Willow said...

She avoids lying.
She keeps her recount in only a few points to keep the stress under her control.

The expected is that she would say something more of the man, if it were true that she unexpectedly, thinking she's in her own apartment found a stranger.

Now she does too good a job avoiding telling lies. She omits what's expected which is why deception can be assumed.
She has a big hole in her recount in the place where she'd be expected to say something (however little, but something) more on how it happened.
Now that she says almost nothing more, is not what's expected.

Is the fact that she basically only repeats one sentence ("I thought I was in my apartment") a sign of premeditation?
Is it a scripted concept she has had time to compile, think through and double-check in her mind to be plausible?
She hangs on to this sentence adding almost nothing more, as she avoids lying more. Lying is stressful. One lie necessitates more lies, unless, the liar makes a conscious effort not to do so. Paradoxically the conscious control of words, that she delivers sparingly, is one reason to suspect deception.

She doesn't say anything of what preceded her shooting him.
She doesn't say things like, he moved towards her. Was it dark?. Did she switch the lights on? Was the situation threatening? Did she see a weapon in his hand, did he assault her. Did she say something to him?

She avoids saying practically anything of him before and after shooting him.

TimA said...

If she had shot an unarmed burglar without warning in her own apartment it would still be murder.

She repeatedly refers to the victim as "hey man", and "hey bud"; familiar terms, maybe she knew the guy.

frommindtomatter said...

The problem I have with this 911 call is that there are a lot of omissions and self- censorship contained within it. We have to ask the important question of was lethal force needed in the situation?

“I’m an off duty officer. I thought I was in my apartment and I shot a guy [thinking that he was]. . . thinking it was my apartment.”

She self-censors on the reason she shot him. What could he have been doing that justified her to shoot him? She does not tell us and is sensitive to it. She doesn’t tell us that he posed a threat to her and we would expect that from her as a strong reason and justification for her actions. It is not there.

Most people’s homes are personal to them, from the number on the door to the carpets, wallpaper, decorations etc.. If I walked into the wrong house I would realise immediately and I believe most people would. There is a big question here of how she came to park on the wrong floor and then enter the wrong apartment.

D: Okay and where are you at right now?

C: I’m in uh. . .[What do you mean?] I’m inside the apartment with him. Hey, come on, man.

The caller is sensitive to being asked their location why? It is a simple question that requires a simple answer which she gives, but only after showing sensitivity to it by questioning the question she was asked. Is she sensitive to her location before or during what has occurred, has she been somewhere else and perhaps done something?

The majority of the callers language shows only concern for their situation and not the victims which is out of place. The important thing at the moment would be the wellbeing of the victim and priority to getting medical assistance for them.

C: Hi. This is an off duty officer. . .um. . . can I get. . .I need EMS. . .um… um I’m in number. . .um

We see a greeting followed by the need to ingratiate/build rapport with the operator. All before the crucial “I need EMS”, this tells us where the priorities of the caller are.

At the moment I need to look at the statement more before I could make a decision on whether the caller is genuine in her plea that it was an accident. I believe she did not mean to shoot the victim, but at the moment I am not certain about how she came to be in the wrong apartment and use lethal force on someone. I suspect there may be a bigger connection between her and the victim other than just an accidental meeting and shooting.

Adrian.

General P. Malaise said...

Anonymous said...
There are a host of sensitivity indicators already mentioned. Would you say, General, that context allows for all of them?

sensitivity does not equal deception. it is sensitivity. context helps us determine if it is appropriate.

shooting someone will create sensitivity. her language is reliable.

as to what she was going to say that is speculation.

John said...

D: What’s going on?

C: I’m an off duty officer. I thought I was in my apartment and I shot a guy thinking that he was. . . thinking it was my apartment.

On it's form the beginning of this sentence is likely true (strong pronoun (+I) use placing herself in the sentence until we get to the pause (....) "thinking it was my apartment" She does not say "I’m an off duty officer. I thought I was in my apartment and I shot a guy thinking that (he was in my apartment). This would be a very strong statement, howver, She omits the latter and says "thinking it was my apartment. Why does she pause and add this, it sounds disjointed.

C: Yes. . . . Oh, my god. I’m done. I didn’t mean to. . I didn’t mean to. . I didn’t mean to. . I’m so sorry. Hey, bud." What didn't she mean to"?

Could it be she was going to issue a denial? If so, she has three opportunities to issue a Reliable denial if this what she was going to, or try to say. She starts of well.
"I didn't". First person, past tense, but then can not bring herself to say shoot / kill him....

D: What’s the gate code there?
C: I don’t know. I don’t know.

How did she get in?


Lots of pauses self censoring missing information (possibly in the negative) and sensitivities (Apartment) which is acceptable i believe. Not enough to go on in my opinion to make a judgement call either way.


CQuinn said...

I agree with the comments above about her salutation ("Hi") establishing an ingratiating factor. I additionally think that by immediately introducing herself as an off duty police officer, she's demanding some respect - moreso than just ingratiating. She gives her title before she says what happened. It's important to her that they know they're dealing with a police officer.
Regarding not knowing the gate code, I believe that residents of places with gates have something like a garage door opener in their car to open the gate, so she may not ever use the code to get in herself.

MizzMarple said...

My apologies for the off topic below:

Any thoughts on Amanda Eller's statement after her rescue? She was lost in the Hawaiian forest for 17 days.

Below is a transcript from a CNN interview with Eller, and others, after her rescue. This transcript is not enough to do a complete analysis, but JMO, I see some deception.

I will have put the Transcript in a separate post due to character count.


MizzMarple said...

Amanda Eller - Part 1:

CNN NEWSROOM

Hiker Found Alive after 17 Days

Aired May 27, 2019 - 09:30 ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


[09:30:00] AMANDA ELLER, RESCUED HIKER: Take the easy way out.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

POPPY HARLOW, CNN ANCHOR: All right, so this was a miracle in Maui. A Hawaiian woman is found alive after getting lost in the forest for 17 days. This morning, her rescuers are describing the moment that they spotted her.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

TROY HELMER, RESCUER: All of a sudden you said, there's -- there's a hiker down there. I said, there's nobody hiking up here. And, sure enough, he said, that's Amanda. That's Amanda.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We got her! We got her!

HELMER: We started --

(END VIDEO CLIP)

HARLOW: Oh, so excited. Our Paul Vercammen has been following this story.

Good morning, Paul.

Those -- those are the folks that were up, as I understand it, in this helicopter that had been funded by donations on a GoFundMe page, when the other official helicopters couldn't find her.

[09:35:01] PAUL VERCAMMEN, CNN CORRESPONDENT: That's exactly right. And, Poppy, they have an extensive background in search and rescue. One of them, a former Army Ranger. And the friends of Amanda Eller are telling me this morning that she is in very good spirit. She was in the Maui wilderness for 17 days and lived to tell about it.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

AMANDA ELLER, RESCUED HIKER: The last 17 days of my life have been the toughest days of my life. And it's been a really significant, spiritual journey that I was guided on.

VERCAMMEN (voice over): A voyage Amanda Eller described with her ecstatic boyfriend in her hospital bed.

A. ELLER: And there were times of total fear and loss and wanting to give up. And it did come down to life and death. And I had to choose. And I chose life. I wasn't going to take the easy way out. Even though that meant more suffering and pain for myself.

VERCAMMEN: Eller got spotted by rescuers in a helicopter and hoisted out of peril in this lush Maui paradise Friday.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Oh, my God. We (EXPLETIVE DELETED).

MizzMarple said...

Amanda Eller - Part 2

CNN Transcript:


VERCAMMEN: Eller lost her shoes, set out to dry in a flash flood, lost her ability to walk properly when she broke a bone in her leg, but hope was not lost.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: That was not expected, that was not expected.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Who-hoo.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: (INAUDIBLE).

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: You can cry now. It's awesome, man.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: You did it.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: That's like the best --

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: You took it pretty well, I have to say.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: You've got a good Memorial Day now.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Oh, no, I was balling like a baby.

A. ELLER: Seeing the way that the community, Maui, came together, people that know me, people that don't know me, all came together, just under the idea of helping one person make it out of the woods alive. It just warms my heart.

VERCAMMEN: This yoga instructor and physical therapist shed almost a pound a day for each day she went missing, 15 pounds total. Her doctor expressed surprise and relief at how well she looked.

DR. ZORA BULATOVIC, AMANDA ELLER'S PHYSICIAN: Tears came down because, you know, that's -- we all have been following her story.

VERCAMMEN: This physician explained how this model patient survived on river water and what food she could pick.

BULATOVIC: Eating fresh fruits from the trees, trying to keep, yes, her nutrition up. So she was very well educated in that and she knew exactly what to take and managed to stay well hydrated.

JULIA ELLER, AMANDA ELLER'S MOM: She's a trooper. Man, she's a real warrior. And I had no doubt if anybody could make it through it, it was her.

VERCAMMEN: Amanda Eller fought for her life and won, armed with undying spirit and true grit.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

VERCAMMEN: And a little more about those rescuers. They say they were in the helicopter. The helicopter was running low on fuel and then they made this one last pass down a gulch and there she was, Amanda.

HARLOW: Wow.

VERCAMMEN: And they were so euphoric. They were told to stop shaking the helicopter for fear that they would take it down, Poppy.

HARLOW: Oh, it's remarkable. I can't wait for one of those who rescued her to join us next hour.

And, Paul, her mother is so right when she calls Amanda a warrior. She certainly is. Thank you for that good news story this Monday.

Jane said...

C: get up, man
She wants him to get up, she wants him to be ok

C: Hi. This is an off duty officer. . .um. . . can I get. . .I need EMS. . .um… um I’m in number. . 
She says ‘Hi’ as she is speaking to one of her own. I would expect her to identify herself as an off duty police officer, in fact this may be correct procedure.
I would expect her to ask for emergency services and give the address


C: Yes. Ineed both.
She needs medical and police assistance

C: Fuck. I’m at apartment number 1478. I’m in1478
The word ‘fuck’ is an expression of her knowing she has made a big mistake.
She gives the correct apartment number

C: Um.. .it’s 1210 South Lamar. . . 1478. . .yes
Yes She gives the correct address and repeats the apartment number

D: What’s going on?

C: I’m an off duty officer. I thought I was in my apartment and I shot a guy thinking that he was. . . thinking it was my apartment.
She repeats that she is an off duty police officer. She owns and commits to The first part of the next sentence ‘I thought I was in my apartment and I shot a guy....’ I have cannot find any deception in these words. But she then does not complete the sentence. She changes the end of the sentence from ‘......thinking that he was...’ to ‘thinking it was my apartment.’ There is something she does not want to tell the operator here about what she was thinking at the time of the shooting with regard to the victim

C: Yes, I thought it was my apartment. I’m fucked. Oh my god. I’m sorry.
Again she is owning her reply. ‘I’m fucked’ She admits she has made a mistake and will have to answer for the consequences.
She invokes deity which is a red flag for deception.
She is sorry for something but does not say what

C: I’m in uh. . .What do you mean? I’m inside the apartment with him. Hey, come on, man.
She has already stated that she is in the apartment. I would expect her to ask what the operator meant. She confirms that she is in the apartment with the victim. ‘Hey come on, man’ I am nor clear here whether she is speaking to the victim or admonishing the operator for not paying attention,


C: I know, but I’m. .I’m gonna lose my job.I thought it was my apartment. Hey, man. Fuck
She is focused on her self and her own predicament, she believes her actions will result in her losing her job. She repeats yet again ‘I thought it was my apartment’ repetition means sensitivity and may indicate deception but not necessarily

C: I am. I am. I need. I know I needa supervisor. Hey, bud. Hey, bud. Come on. Fuck. I thought it was my apartment.
She is staying with the operator. She is still focused on herself and her own predicament. She speaks to the victim, trying to rouse him. She again uses the word ‘fuck’ acknowledging that she has made a mistake

C: I thought it was my apartment. Hurry, please.
Another repetition of ‘I thought it was my apartment ‘

C: I need. . .I. . .Ithought it was my apartment. I thoughtit was my apartment. I could have sworn I parked on the third floor.
She has a need for something but does not say what
More repetition ‘ I thought it was my apartment’
‘I could have sworn I parked on the third floor’ when she parked her car she thought she was on the third floor when in reality she was on the fourth

Jane said...


C: No. I thought it was my apartment. I thought it was my apartment. I thought it was my apartment. I thought it was my apartment.
She tells the operator that they don’t understand.
More repetition ‘I thought it was my apartment ‘

C: [Unintelligible.] I thought it was my apartment.
More repetition ‘I thought it was my apartment ‘

C: No. I thought it was my apartment. I thought it was my apartment.
More repetition ‘I thought it was my apartment’

C: On the fourth floor. Fourth.Hey, bud. Hey, bud. They’re coming. 
She answers correctly and speaks to the victim. She reassures him that ‘they’re coming’
They’re coming. I’m sorry man.
She repeats that help is coming and tells the victim she is sorry.

D: Okay, where was he shot?

C: He’s on the top, top left.
She reports the location of the apartment and does not give details of where the victims injuries are. This response may be expected as she is focused on help arriving or she may be avoiding revealing the extent of injury knowing he is fatally shot.

C: Yes. . . . Oh, my god. I’m done. I didn’t mean to. . I didn’t mean to. . I didn’t mean to. . I’m so sorry. Hey, bud.
She confirms that she is with Dallas P.D.
She again invokes deity and expresses knowledge that she has made a grave mistake.
‘I didn’t mean to...’ is said in the negative indicating possible deception with regards to what comes after, it is repeated three times indicating sensitivity and she does not tell us what it was that she didn’t mean to do, she is concealing information.
She is ‘so sorry’ ....for what?

C: I know. Stay with me bud.. . Oh, my god.
She wants the victim to survive but realises he may be slipping away. She invokes deity

C: I thought it was my apartment. I thought it was my apartment. Holy fuck. I thought it was my apartment. Oh my god. I thought it was my apartment. I’m so sorry. I’m so sorry. [unintelligible] Oh my god.
She again repeats ‘I thought it was my apartment’
She invokes deity.
She is ‘so sorry’ which is repeated

C: No. . .no. . I . . I. . how the fuck did I put the. . how did I . . I’m so tired. Hurry. Hey! Over here, over here.
She question how she did something but does not tell the operator what.
She is ‘...so tired’ The use of the extra word ‘so’ may be an attempt to convince of her tiredness or it may be that she feels beyond tired ie exhausted

C: No, it’s me. I’m off duty. I’m off duty. I fucked. I thought they were in my apartment. I thought this was my floor.  
She informs police that she is ‘off duty’
She informs them that she ‘..fucked’ admitting to them that she made a mistake
She informs them that ‘I thought they were in my apartment’ this is a change in wording from ‘I thought it was my apartment’
She informs them ‘I thought this was my floor’ explaining why she thought it was her apartment that they were in.

Did the subject reliably report what happened?

The subject omits information about the actual shooting, the victims injuries and what she was thinking about the victim at the time of the shooting. She is deceptive with regards to the actual shooting.
(She may have believed he was in her apartment to cause her harm and in a split second decision she may have decided to shoot to kill. Depending on all the circumstances of the case, this may have been against police procedures, (do not shoot/shoot to disable and/or disarm) and she believes this could result in her losing her job)

Did she shoot him believing she was in her own apartment? 

She did shoot him believing she was in her own apartment.

Anonymous said...

Mizz,
Thanks for posting this transcript! From what I've seen of her interviews on the news, she seems incredibly self centered (which may not be totally unexpected given what she's claimed to have endured) and loves the attention but there's something sketchy about the whole thing. Definitely going to drill down on her comments

Violet said...

Could someone analyze this statement, please? Also, the statement included 3 pics..one normal pic of the victim and then two of her in the hospital bed, swollen, bruised, etc. I seen it on FB.

(for context, the victim was on vacation in the Dominican at an all inclusive resort when this happened):

"My story...please no negative comments, this is my truth as I lived it.

How do you explain to your kids you were almost killed by some random stranger and that ‘Mommy is coming home, but I don’t look like myself’? How do you look into your parents eyes as they gaze upon your battered face telling them, ‘I’m okay, I’ll be okay’. Seeing friends break down in tears as they look at you. Everyone asking, ‘why?’, ‘how?’ You tell them a story. You recount every detail very matter of fact so that you don’t break down, that you stay strong… so they don’t see how you are crumbling inside with fear, disappointment, and weakness.

Now that I’ve had some time to heal, it’s time to tell my story, in the hopes that women will be more aware, and hopefully prevent what happened to me. I also want people to understand that the resorts will claim NO liability or responsibility and you will have no recourse for any reimbursement of expenses.

I went on vacation at the end of January with my husband and our best friends, Diane and James. We went to an all-inclusive resort, Majestic Elegance, in the Dominican Republic. We arrived on a Monday night. After checking out the resort, we went to bed relatively early (10ish), because let’s face it… it was a long day and we aren’t so young anymore!
Tuesday brought sunshine and beach-time! That night we met up with our friends for the theatre show. It was all about 80's music…right up our alley.
The show ended somewhere around 10:30pm and we went back to our rooms. I had worked up an appetite dancing so I called down to room service. I received a ‘busy’ message so I tried calling again. At that time I got a message that they were no longer serving (I can’t remember the exact message). I told my husband I was going to run downstairs to the lounge in our building for a snack and I’d be back in 5 minutes. I ended up bypassing the lounge in our building, and opted to go to the lounge in the next building. which was on the beach. I thought I could get some pictures of the moon on the water, but I never made it to the beach.

As I went through the rotunda between buildings, I noticed there wasn’t anyone in the hallway. Not majorly odd, but still eerily quiet. I took about 10 or so steps just swinging my wristlet back and forth, not a care in the world. That's when I heard it. Heavy footsteps... one, two, three, four, then they sped up, and then before I could react I was plowed into from behind and immediately immobilized. His arms wrapped around me and he started pulling me immediately into an unlocked maintenance room...

I’m not going to go into the gory details of everything, however, please know that I fought with everything I had at that moment. He was too strong. The next 8 hours brought me pain and fear. I was strangled multiple times to unconsciousness. My lifeless body was drug down concrete stairs to an underground waste water area. I was kicked in the head, I was beaten with a club. And then strangled again for the kill; at which time he disposed of my body into an area I refer to as the ‘hole’. I was unconscious multiple times during this savage attack, so I have no idea what else was done to me during that time. Somehow I survived. Again, I won't go into all of the hell that I went through being basically 'buried' in that hell hole for so many hours. (cont'd)..

Violet said...

I spent 5 days in the medical clinic (an offsite hospital) and had surgery to repair my injuries. I am still dealing with several issues, including nerve damage, as well as, all of the medical expenses since being home. Majestic Elegance claims no responsibility for the attack since I couldn't identify the attacker (even though he was wearing a uniform WITH the resort logo and hit me directly in front of the unlocked maintenance room and dragged me down concrete stairs to a basement so that no one could hear or find me.) Police did find evidence of the blood smeared mop handle and a maintenance hat in the area I was found, but this means nothing in these countries.
There are no cameras, no bright lighting, etc. My husband and friends went to the front desk at least 3 times throughout the night before security even agreed to look for me. This consisted of them taking a quad to the beach and looking on the beach. The security at Majestic Elegance thought I was drunk somewhere. I went missing at 10:30 and was found over 8 hrs later. It was hell.

This man thought he killed me, but he failed. He is still out there, a predator, waiting for his next victim. Only the next woman may not be so fortunate. Please, please do not walk alone. These attacks are happening too frequently and the criminals are NOT being prosecuted even though evidence is found. Victims are not being compensated for medical or pain and suffering, and the resorts are not held liable. Majestic Elegance didn't offer to reimburse us for our vacation, let alone my current medical bills. Litigation went nowhere. Stories are being squashed.
When you are in unfamiliar places, or even in familiar places, please remember…be smart, be safe.

Pictures are from prior and at the hospital after they cleaned me up."

Leigh said...

I agree that her reaction was unnecessary. She could've retreated and called for backup. That may be one of the "other issues" when discussing this case. Keeping to the question if she was deceptive about unknowingly entering the wrong apartment, my conclusion is no. The red flags we see in the transcript are flagged for a guilty caller. This is someone who calls and feigns not knowing what happened. She is verbalizing she knows what happened and displaying red flags for a guilty caller. A perpetrator is a perpetrator whether they admit it or not. They will both have red flags. Her language does show her primary focus is on self with little regard towards her victim. It would be interesting to know if she is former military because the "get up man" and "hey bud" sound like something said to a fallen comrade waiting for medical help. I am looking forward to reading Peter's analysis.

Leigh

Violet said...

I'm kind of wondering if he was already dead, and that is why she showed no concern for his injuries. Maybe she had a few minutes to think about what she would say during the call before she called?

Tania Cadogan said...

Off topic

One week after an Illinois judge ordered "Empire" actor Jussie Smollett's criminal case file to be unsealed, the Chicago Police Department has released the documents.

The file includes more than 460 pages of case reports, arrest files and supplementary files, Chicago police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi said in a statement to Fox News on Thursday.

Guglielmi said 300-plus pages of supplementary materials -- including handwritten detective notes, subpoena records and ancillary material -- will also be delivered, hopefully by this time next week.

"The final release will be pertinent video files that require a heavy amount of digital redaction for things like license plates of unrelated vehicles and the blurring of faces of individuals not involved in the criminal investigation," Guglielmi said. "We hope to have that completed by the week after next."

Earlier this month, Cook County Judge Steven Watkins, who presided over a March hearing where prosecutors dismissed the charges with little explanation, ordered records in the controversial case be made public.

Smollett made national headlines in January when he filed a police report alleging that two masked men attacked him, put a rope around his neck and poured bleach on him. Smollett, who is black and openly gay, claimed the men made racist and homophobic comments and yelled “This is MAGA country," a pointed reference to President Trump’s “Make America Great Again” campaign slogan.

After an intense investigation, police said Smollett staged the entire episode to drum up publicity for his career. Smollett has strongly denied the accusations.

After the charges were dropped, the court approved a request by his lawyer to seal the case. Several news organizations, including The Associated Press and The New York Times, asked the judge to reverse the decision, arguing there was a need for more transparency as to why prosecutors suddenly decided to abandon charges. Smollett’s lawyers had argued that since the case was dropped, Smollett had “the right to be left alone.”

But Judge Watkins disagreed.

Smollett “voluntarily appeared on national television for an interview speaking about the incident in detail,” the judge wrote. “After the March 26 dismissal, he voluntarily stood in front of cameras from numerous news organizations in the courthouse lobby and spoke about the case. On several occasions, attorneys for defendant, presumably with his authorization, appeared on various media outlets speaking about the case.”

Watkins added, “These are not the actions of a person seeking to maintain his privacy or simply to be let alone.”

Natalie Spears, an attorney representing the media organizations that wanted the file unsealed, applauded Watkins’ May 23 decision.

“This is about transparency and trust in the system and we believe the public has a right to know what the government did and why,” she said after the hearing.

At the time, there was no immediate comment from Cook County State’s Attorney Kim Foxx. Though Foxx has publicly said she’d welcome an independent probe into her office’s decision, she has fought an effort by a retired Illinois appeals court judge to force the appointment of a special prosecutor.

https://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/chicago-police-release-a-batch-of-jussie-smollett-case-documents

CQuinn said...

Violet - I saw that statement of the attack in the Dominican Republic on facebook as well, and her account raises some red flags. I would love for Peter to analyze her statement.

frommindtomatter said...

Violet said... Could someone analyze this statement, please?

Just a few things from it and there are a lot more.

“His arms [wrapped] around me and he started [pulling] me immediately into an [unlocked] maintenance room...”

Two uses of soft tone language - “wrapped around me” is not expected to describe being grabbed by an attacker, we would wrap our arms around someone to give them a hug. “Pulling me” – we expect pushed or forced or other stronger word to describe the actions of the attacker.

She also tells us she was pulled into an “unlocked maintenance” room. The fact she tells us it unlocked is unexpected, to be able to enter the room it must be unlocked so we see her mentioning the fact as extra information which is sensitive to her. Did she witness the door being unlocked? I believe so.

She initially told us she went down for food and gave the location as in the same building she was already in. At the end of the paragraph we see her say “but I never made it to the beach” which suggests that was the reason for her going down and that was the destination she had in mind.

“so I called down to room service. I received a ‘busy’ message so I tried calling again. At that time I got a message that they were no longer serving (I can’t remember the exact message)”

Notice she needs to tell us “I can’t remember the exact message”. It is not needed and is sensitive to her. One she did not need to tell us that, and two she says she “can’t remember” not that she doesn’t remember.

The whole statement read like a story and she even tells us that – “You tell them [a story]. You recount every detail very matter of fact so that you don’t break down
She tells them “a” story.

Also at the introduction – “"My story...please no negative comments, this is [my truth] as I lived it.”

She tells us this is not “the” truth but “my truth” and “my story”.

The whole statement is full of extra information, sensitivity and deceptive language in my opinion. I beleive she arranged to meet someone and it all went wrong.

Adrian.

John said...

How do [you] explain to [your] kids [you] were almost killed by some random stranger and that ‘Mommy is coming home, but [I] don’t look like [myself]’? How do [you] look into [your] parents eyes as they gaze upon [your] battered face telling them, ‘[I’m] okay, I’ll be okay’. Seeing friends break down in tears as they look at [you.] Everyone asking, ‘why?’, ‘how?’ [You] tell them a story. [You ]recount every detail very matter of fact so that [you] don’t break down, that [you] stay strong… so they don’t see how [you] are crumbling inside with fear, disappointment, and weakness.


This is up close and personal, it is not universal. It doesn't happen to everyone. It is a violent invasion and should be in the first person. Why does she in the second person (distancing language)?

Unless the passage of time would cause this type of language. If not, i would be concerned all is not well.

CQuinn said...

Adrian - I had the same thought about an arranged meeting. The passive language in her attack "I was strangled" "I was beaten" instead of "He strangled me" "He beat me" seeks to suppress the identity of the attacker. Note also the way she speaks of her husband. The percentage is also off - the attack should be about 50% of the statement, while the intro and what happens after the attack should each take up about 25% of the statement. The intro is far longer and the description of the attack - which she actively avoids describing saying she'll spare us the details - is the shortest part of the statement. I believe she was beaten, but there's something else going on.

Bobcat said...

Before I read the newest post...


"Is the subject reliably reporting what happened?"

No. The dispatcher asks five questions before she relays that the injured person is not herself!


"Did the subject shoot the victim believing he was an intruder in her own apartment?"

No. Her avoidance of answering the questions about the address and her EXTREME need to persuade in the repeated "I thought it was my apartment" give her away.


Amber is not conveying, she is convincing.

Bobcat said...

Another thought before I read the answer:

Does the introduction of parking and repeated "I didn't mean to" indicate premeditation?

Violet said...

@frommindtomatter-- someone posted on FB that they had went by that maintenance room and the door was propped open. So that may be why she said it was unlocked. I also read the building she decided to go to for food is on the beach so that is why she referenced it as such. Something about the room service call does not add up at all. Not only in her wording, but it is served 24 hours a day so she shouldn't have been told it was closed. Perhaps that was her excuse to leave the room? I also noticed she said "My Story" right off the bat. "My truth" sounds very different than "THE truth".

@john, about the passage of time, if I remember correctly this happened in January.

Perhaps she did lie about why she went out. That would explain some deception.

I really wish Peter would analyze this.

Thank you for the comments. This story just doesn't sit right and it has turned into a disaster for people now scared of traveling.

General P. Malaise said...

Bobcat said...
Another thought before I read the answer:

Does the introduction of parking and repeated "I didn't mean to" indicate premeditation?


maybe it means "I didn't mean to". it is stated reliably, believe it.

Statement Analysis Blog said...

her priority was self preservation and she is not an endearing character.

Often those we do not like Indicate veracity just as often those we like indicate deception.

We work to be disinterested.

Peter

Mike Dammann said...

What everyone seems to overlook here is the following:
"C: No, it’s me. I’m off duty. I’m off duty. I fucked. I thought they were in my apartment. I thought this was my floor. "

Plural: "I thought THEY were in my apartment."

Willow said...

Mike,
what if C. was using 'they' in the singular?

Even if C. did that, meaning singular with 'they', there is room to ask, why she did it.
She could have said 'he'. Couldn't she?

What's your educated guess, why did she choose to say 'they'? To create distance? To imply that she thought there were more persons, therefore, to make the murder look less overkill?

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/grammar/using-they-and-them-in-the-singular

Mike Dammann said...

It could mean she had previous contact with the victim and his friends. She thought she was in her own apartment. She complained about the victim before because of noise. She could have thought she was in her own apartment and that the victim alongside his friends broke into her apartment to confront her. She felt threatened and shot him.