Friday, February 26, 2021

Guest Submission: Brad Dunlap Missing Wife by Luke Kukovica




Brad Dunlap’s wife is missing. Her car is found in a Kmart parking lot. The following is the transcript then transcript with analysis from this you tube video. This is a cold case. Anne Dunlap was reported missing Dec. 30 1995. 

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QCLoFLNKg34

 

BRAD DUNLAP’S INTERVIEW AND 911 CALL


911 call: The first of four 911 calls, came from at approximately 9:00 p.m. on December 30, 1995, the day Anne went missing.

“911? Hi, I was hoping you could tell me the procedure of who I might call.

My wife left to go shopping about seven hours ago and I have not heard from her since, and I was expecting her back a long time ago.

  1. He did not report her missing, nor use the word “missing.”

  2. He is withholding information about what took place just prior to her leaving. 

  3. He did not commit to reporting her missing (“hoping”, “could”, “procedure” and “might”) but gave weak commitment. This may indicate that he was committed to urgency in reporting her missing. 

  4. Possible ingratiation (if audio bears out that he could hear her) with “hi” and politeness. (lack of urgency)

  5. She is not named nor does he give his name: both are anonymous at this point. 

  6. He does not offer concern for her, nor information such as who he called prior to calling 911 emergency. He did not offer where she went shopping; information of importance given the context. 

  7. Was this a perfunctory call of “record” rather than to report his wife missing? 

  8. He calls the emergency police line to ask how he might  report a non-emergency--- the non emergency is his perception.  

  9. We cannot say that he reported her missing because he did not; nor can we say he perceived her as missing. 

  10. The subject is communicating with us in the 911 call. What is he saying? He is not telling us his wife is missing, yet he expects us to understand what he is communicating. He wants us to come to a conclusion(s) he is unable or unwilling to state himself. 



INTERVIEW

In a Kmart parking lot, where Anne’s car has been found. The car is still in the parking lot and the police, reporters and BD are there.


BD: you know, we’ve got to do whatever we can to…to find her, uh…

R: I know you’ve been through it a million times, I’m going to ask you to go through it one more time.

BD: That’s, that’s fine. I don’t mind telling the story because the important thing is that people hear it and so we can have a chance to find her. Um…

R: (interrupting). Exactly. Tell me what happened yesterday.

BD: Um…Actually…it was Saturday. On Saturday at 2.30 she left our house to go to the Mall of America just to do some shopping. It was going to be a quick trip to look for some shoes at Nordstrom’s, um, um, …where she buys all of her shoes. Um…she was to be home at 4.30…she…uh…didn’t show up…it was starting to snow thou and rain and I, and we had to run an errand, this tropical fish and had to get some salt water, to make a water change, …so, anyway, I know we’re gonna go to dinner, so I decided I would run out and, and get the water…uh…because I figured ... you know … the snow and everything … she probably … you know … busy at the mall and just running late … you know (….)

I called her from the fish place and she s…she wasn’t there and it concerned me a little bit, but, nah, you know…maybe she’s even in the bathroom or something…so, I just left her a message. Came home and she still wasn’t home. Then I started to get real concerned. Cause it was after 6 o’clock by that time and uh, very unlike her. If, uh, she’s gonna be even 15 minutes late, she’s a person that would call, and just like, she’s not, she’s a very detailed, organized person and so, being prompt and having things going in order is very important to her…uh…so I started to get real worried, uh…her parents, her in laws, we’re actually living with them because we are building a house in Medina right now, yeah, and we are living with her parents for a couple of months till our house is finished…uh…they were up at their lake home and I called them, they’d left that morning and they came back into town and as I called, I called the police, they said just call hospitals, that’s all we can do at this point…so, as I called hospitals, they went down to Mall of America, drove around the parking lot, checked for the car, couldn’t find it anywhere. Um…we, uh…uh…oh, what am I trying to say?

R: Her parents didn’t hear from her?

BD: No. No, she never called, never seen her since, and she just virtually disappeared. Then, yesterday, we were calling, your station, and I appreciate it…you know…the…the pieces that you ran on Ann and ah…you know, newspapers and the Star Tribune everybody, you know…being real helpful getting information out there, and working with the police. Calling people, trying to get people involved, and let people know about Ann, we put a flyer together, uh…with the help of Missing Children Association, they helped us put that together, and then this morning we were … called, we called all our friends yesterday, and we’re having them all meet and hand out flyers, pass out flyers. And…

R: Anything going on in her life that might make her want to drop out of sight, or…

BD: No. Just, just the opposite. Uh, everything in our life is like the best that’s ever been. She’s…uh…she just got promoted at work and things are just going fabulously for her, (…) Marketing manager there, uh…hum, she, we are building a brand-new home in Medina, it’s her dream home, we’re planning a family…uh…just everything that, that is, that you want out of in life is happening for us, so, it’s very unusual.

R: How long have you been married?

BD: We’re married for a little over 8 years ah; we dated for 3 years though before that, you know…

R: How concerned does this make you to see the car here and,

BD: (looking at the car) Well, um…I, I’m happy, I’m happy that we found it because I’m hoping that it’ll give us some clues on where she might be…um, I don’t know what to think. I mean…it’s just uh…First it scares me, because… (sobbing) it’s here…hah…you know…I didn’t know if we’d find it, because I thought the police would find it yesterday…umm, then I talked to a guy at the FBI and he said that, generally they find the car after an all-points bulletin is put out in a few hours and he thought that maybe the car was out of town, she was out of the Twin Cities area, so…when we found it today I was really surprised. I mean after…

R: (…)to realize the car is here?

BD: I just, thinking about it, thinking about her being gone is very hard for me. I mean (sobs)…you know…it’s tough (sobs) I’m sorry. It’s just, it’s…it’s a…you know, we just, you know, we just wanna find her and uh, you know, bring her home. There … you know, we just, we focus on the positives, you know, the good exposure we got from the media to help us, and hopefully getting these flyers out will get, we’ll find somebody that, that’s seen Ann and, and, you know, we’ll get a clue. And, uh…

R: Anything about the car, anything in the car

BD: It, it looks, uh…

R: I know we can’t touch it, let’s go…

BD: It looks…it looks uh…(walking towards the car). It looks totally normal to me…and…the detective, we kinda peered through the windows in there, you know, just like I said, there seem to be just a Hollywood Video bag and uh…a drugstore bag, and…it’s a bottle of water in the seat in there, umm which wouldn’t be unusual because she drinks the bottled water being a runner and an athlete, she…she does that but…

R: It doesn’t seem damaged, and there’s been no accident

BD: No, it looks like normal…it’s an older car…uh…but, you know…it…

R: Have the police told you anything that, that is going on…

BD: No, they just want us to stay away from the car until they get a blood hound here, because um…they’re hoping that, uh, we brought some clothes that Ann had worn recently…and they’re hoping that a blood hound can maybe lead them a trail, and…give them a direction from here, um…and I guess if they get into the car that’ll (long pause) cause a problem.

R: ruin the scent

BD: Yeah, so…so we’re just…you know…

R: It’s a..

BD: we’re kind of at an impasse see … and I don’t know what the…I’m happy we found the car because, it might be a source of clues. That’s, that’s all. Um…but…um…

R: This isn’t an area of the town she’d have come

BD: No, um…aye she…the thing is, she, when she goes to discount department stores, she’d always shop at Target, she’s very Target loyal, she’d never go to Kmart just in general, and she’d never come to this part of town. Um, never alone, and never, never this part of town. She’s, she’s a very careful person in that respect, uh…you know, she carries a mace with her in her keychain, uh…she’s, very careful.

R: (interrupting) Nothing of hers is in the car?

BD: No, there’s a pair of glasses that we saw in the car, um…and there’s uh…the keys are in the car, in the ignition, which is…I don’t know.

R: I don’t know either.

BD: I don’t know if that’s odd or not.

R: I don’t know either. Can we just leave it on you for a few minutes?

BD: sure 

R: How you interact with your friends and the police and you don’t want to interfere, but we sort of like to…

BD: It’s….no, it’s, just. It’s…you know, uh…things that give us hope are like that story about the little girl, you know, that, you know, after three months being gone, you know, she came back, and I’m sure she’s gonna have problems, you know, she has to go through, but, at least she’s home, you know, and that’s all we want, it’s to get Ann back in one piece and, uh, you know, and just ( sobbing) continue on, you know…so…

R: You hang in there. They’re gonna find her.

BD: Thank you. (sobbing) It’s just uh…it’s hard. You know, it’s just hard.

----

R: That’s OK

BD: These are pictures, uh…that’s actually after, uh…this is Twin Cities marathon, uh…that’s uh…after we finished the marathon, I believe that was the year before last, that’s Ann and me and her brother David at her parents’ home. And this is uh, Ann and me…in uh, Mexico, that’s Puerta Vallarta with Ann’s mother, and uh…that’s actually on my birthday…um…I just remember the band and the place we were at on my birthday so …

R: It looks beautiful, it looks that you had a great time.

BD: Yeah, yeah it was, it was very very wonderful, so…

R2: Can you show me the other two?

BD: Yeah.

R2: There she is.

BD: There she is, uh…that’s when she just finished, came across the finish line at Twin Cities marathon…and uh…that is her at her parents’ home with her brother and me, so…

R: You’re a handsome couple.

BD: Well thank you
R: she’s lovely.

BD: well thank you very much.

R: Those are good pictures.

BD: Yeah. So…one thing that…uh…one of my friends said that uh…the security here at the parking lot, they came through and the car wasn’t here at 12.30 at night, so…um, that’s uh…I don’t know what that means, but, maybe that means that the trail will be fresh enough for the dogs and that, we’ll be able that, if they left here on foot, that we’ll be able to get a dog trail, and a friend of mine said that there might be a local business that they might have like a, a security camera or something, that might have picked up something too.

R: Well, it gives us a timeline …

BD: right

R: that’s important.






BRAD DUNLAP’S INTERVIEW AND 911 CALL


911 call: The first of four 911 calls, came from at approximately 9:00 p.m. on December 30, 1995, the day Anne went missing.

“911? Hi, I was hoping you could tell me the procedure of who I might call.

My wife left to go shopping about seven hours ago and I have not heard from her since, and I was expecting her back a long time ago.


INTERVIEW

In a Kmart parking lot, where Anne’s car has been found. The car is still in the parking lot and the police, reporters and BD are there.


BD: you know, we’ve got to do whatever we can to…to find her, uh…

  1. Unknown question where the interview starts.

  2. The subject starts withyou know”, indicating he may want time to formulate an answer as well as an awareness of an audience. It should be noted how much he uses the term “you know” as he uses it 30 times in this interview. Also noting if it increases with questions. 

  3. “you know” can indicate many things, 

  1.  it can be a verbal pause, stalling for time.

  2. An acute awareness of the audience.

  3. a need to be heard, 

  4. a way to illicit support from the audience, 

  5. to gauge how ones words are being accepted

  6. to persuade that what is said is factual, to bolster affirmation.

  1. The subject uses the pronoun “we” where “I” is expected since it is his wife who is missing. 


R: I know you’ve been through it a million times, I’m going to ask you to go through it one more time.

BD: That’s, that’s fine. I don’t mind telling the story because the important thing is that people hear it and so we can have a chance to find her. Um…

  1. The subject repeats “that’s, that’s fine.” This gives him time to think and formulate an answer. This may be appropriate or it may indicate concern about what he says. He should have no concern if he has nothing to do with her disappearance. 

  2. This bolster the point above about the subject’s need to take care on what he says is now doubled with “I don’t mind telling the story …”, this is unnecessary language and presented in the negative making it more sensitive to him. NOTE, “telling the story” may indicate he is deceptive as a story can mean fiction. We would need to know what his definition of “story” is. 

  3. “I don’t mind telling the story …”, After using the word “fine” the subject says “I don’t mind …” this doubling up on affirmation may be an indication that the subject need to persuade he is ok with the questioning. Consider the opposite to be possible. 

  4. The subject continues to offer sensitive language with because the important thing is that people hear it and so we can have a chance to find her. Um…” Note, the blue indicates the subject telling the “reason why” which should be unnecessary and one of the highest indicators of sensitivity. 

  5. because the important thing is that people hear it and so we can have a chance to find her. Um…” Note, the priority in his language, it is more important to the subject that “people need to hear it” and then his wife, “so we can have a chance to find her …” Note that he uses the pronoun “we”. Is his wife more important to the collective than to himself?

  6. “… and so we can have a chance to find her. Um…” Note, the subject uses the word “chance”, this is unexpected for a husband who wants to find his wife.



R: (interrupting). Exactly. Tell me what happened that day.

BD: Um…Actually…it was Saturday. On Saturday at 2.30 she left our house to go to the Mall of America just to do some shopping. It was going to be a quick trip to look for some shoes at Nordstrom’s, um, um,…where she buys all of her shoes.


  1. Here are many heightened indicators of sensitivity highlighted in blue. “left” when used a connecting verb and there is no indication of rushing is one of the highest indicators of sensitivity. It often indicates the subject’s mind is still in the location “left”. Then there are two reasons why given, regarding the “why” for an action. The investigators want to know “what” happened, when a subject goes to “why” it is often a need to explain or pre-empt a question that is often only in the mind of the subject. It is expected that when someone goes to a mall it is to buy something. It is the subject’s need to give the reason why that heightens the sensitivity. 

  2. “On Saturday at 2.30 she left our house to go to the Mall of America just to do some shopping.” The addition of “just” which is a comparative word means that the speaker is thinking of at least one other thing in context to going to the “Mall of America”. 

  3. “It was going to be a quick trip to look for some shoes at Nordstrom’s, um, um,…where she buys all of her shoes.” The need to explain his wife’s trip to the mall continues, bringing more focus on the subjects need to explain why she went there. This becomes a need to persuade (NTP) which often indicates the opposite. Why does the subject add, “It was going to be a quick trip.”? He doesn’t reference his wife telling him it was going to be a “quick trip” or that she said she was going to buy “shoes”. Note, the subject does not say she went to buy shoes but that, to look for some shoes…” and  “um, um,…where she buys all of her shoes.”, this type of passive language is often employed in deception. Note, his wife is missing almost two days at this point. This is given without context. Did he go to Nordstrom to question the clerks or tell the police this? Or is this a need to persuade (NTP) she went to the mall? 

  4. Repeated words and phrases indicate heightened sensitivity to those words. Here “shoes” is repeated and in context of a missing person is unexpected. Note, it is important to the subject even if not to the audience.


Um…she was to be home at 4.30…she…uh…didn’t show up…it was starting to snow thou and rain and I, we had to run an errand, this tropical fish and had to get some salt water, to make a water change, …so, anyway, I know we’re gonna go to dinner, so I decided I would run out in the end, get the water…uh…because I figured … you know … the snow and everything … she probably … you know … busy at the mall and just running late … you know(….)


  1. “Um…she was to be home at 4.30…she…uh…didn’t show up…” the pauses and broken language are indications of a need to be careful about what is said. When one is honestly recalling an account there isn’t a need to be careful about what is said and it should flow easily, when it doesn’t it is an indication that the words are not from experiential memory.

  2. “Um…she was to be home at 4.30…she…uh…didn’t show up…” Here again the subject does not attribute who said she “was to be home at 4:30”. This passivity is unexpected. 

  3. “it was starting to snow thou and rain and I, we had to run an errand, …”, note the pronoun change, the subject goes from the expected “I” to the unexpected “we”. Who is included here to use the term “we”? Was there someone with him? Was his wife with him?

  4. “…it was starting to snow thou and rain and …” This appears to be a need to add urgency and therefore a need to persuade where no need exists. 

  5. The subject brings “water” into his language. Here it is used twice. While “water” or referencing to “water” such as washing etc. is not an indicator of guilt it is often referenced by guilty people in an unconscious need to cleanse or clean themselves. Therefore, in statement analysis it is always flagged and studied for context. Note, the subject also mentioned “rain”, “and rain” which also cleanses. 

I called her from the fish place and she s…she wasn’t there and it concerned me a little bit, but, nah, you know…maybe she’s even in the bathroom or somethingso, I just left her a message

  1. “I called her from the fish place …” The subject uses passive language, “the fish place”. Why? His wife is missing and he can not or will not name the location he is at. Note, the subject has not used her name yet in this interview. 

  2. “… and she s…she wasn’t there …” Again, the subject uses passivity. Passivity is used to conceal identity and or responsibility. He does not say where “there” is. This is often seen in deception where the speaker leaves the information as passive, having the audience assume it means what the speaker can not or will not state. Note, the subject stumbles on the pronoun “she” repeating it. This could be self-censoring and/or sensitivity about his wife in context to his words. 

  3. “… and it concerned me a little bit …” Why does the subject tell us he is concerned at this point? Did he have a reason to be concerned? He had a need to tell us he was, something he directly downplays with the qualifier “a little bit”. What is his concern? This could be linguistic manipulation. 

  4. “… but, nah, you know…maybe she’s even in the bathroom or somethingso, I just left her a message.After stating he was “a little bit concerned” he dismisses it with “but” which refutes or minimizes what came before.  “… but, nah, you know…maybe she’s even in the bathroom or something …” Note, the dismissal with “nah you know” to portray himself as a concerned husband who is being overly worried, the good guy principal. The need to be portrayed as a good guy often indicates the opposite.   

  5. “…maybe she’s even in the bathroom or something …” Why does the subject add the word “even”, this goes against the law of economy where it is expected that a person will convey a though that is expected to be understood by the recipient in the least amount of words. It is also an unnecessary word for the intent to be conveyed. Unnecessary words to the recipient but not unnecessary to the speaker. “even” indicates a comparative process meaning the subject is thinking of another location as he is speaking.  

  6. “…maybe she’s even in the bathroom or something …” This sentence is flagged as was “water” earlier for the connection to cleansing/cleaning not only from an aspect of guilt but of a physical need to clean, as cleaning up a crime scene. This is not to impart that mentioning a “bathroom” somehow indicates guilt. It is noted that the subject mentioned it while it is unnecessary to the audience, it is necessary for the subject. Why was “bathroom” in the front of the subject’s thoughts? 

  7. “… but, nah, you know…maybe she’s even in the bathroom or somethingso, I just left her a message.” The subject again needs to give the reasons “why”, moving beyond the necessary “what” indicating the topic is very sensitive. Again, this is highlighted in blue to show it as one of the highest sensitivity indicators found in statement analysis. 

  8. “…so, I just left her a message.” The inclusion of the word “just” tells us the subject is thinking of at least one other thing in context of “left her a message”. Note, how the word “just” changes the sentence. It diminishes the message. 


Came home and she still wasn’t home. 

  1. Note, the missing or ejected pronoun “I”, who “came home”? When a subject leaves out an expected personal pronoun it is often due to a lack of commitment to the words and possibly deception.

  2. The subject adds the word “still”, which is unnecessary and breaks the rule of economy. To say “she still wasn’t home” is to presuppose that she wasn’t home in the time he was out. How would he know she didn’t come home and leave again? 


Then I started to get real concerned cause it was after 6 o’clock by that time and uh, very unlike her

  1. “Then …”  there is likely a jump over time and missing information indicated by the word “then”. Note, we do not have a time frame from the subject. We do not know when he got home.

  2. “Then I started to get real concerned …” The word “started” indicates an incomplete and on-going action. Generally, it is expected that one becomes concerned or is not concerned. It seems that the subject is manipulating the audience with a narrative of happenstance. Why would someone need to manipulate the narrative? The subject then bolsters this with the additional and unnecessary word “real”. The subjects need to double down on his “concern” is possibly a need to persuade the audience. If his wife was missing there should be no such need.

  3. The subject then gives one of the highest indicators of sensitivity by telling the audience “why”.  “… cause it was after 6 o’clock by that time …”, followed by a second reason “why”, “… and uh, very unlike her.” elevating the sensitivity. 

If, uh, she’s gonna be 15 minutes late, she’s a person that would call, and just like, she’s not, … she’s a very detailed, organized person and so, being prompt and having things going in order is very important to her

  1. The subject continues to add to the sensitivity. He emphasizes her “normal” behavior. 

  2. Note, “If, uh, she’s gonna be 15 minutes late, she’s a person that would call …” Here the subject distances himself from his wife and the behavior he has indicated as “normal”. He could have said “if she’s gonna be late she would call”, this would be short, reliable and lack sensitivity and distancing. The subject refers to her as “a person” where “she” or “my wife” is expected.  

  3. “… and just like, she’s not, …” The subject self-censors or changes his mind as to what to say. In truthful accounts there is no need to be careful about what is said so self-censoring or a change track on what to say is an indication of sensitivity and is often seen in deceptive accounts. 

  4. “… she’s a very detailed, organized person and so, being prompt and having things going in order is very important to her …”. The addition of “to her” may indicate a separation between them, this may not be important to him and could be a backhanded “compliment”. It is an unnecessary addition to the sentence.  


…uh…so I started to get real worried, 

  1. The word,sois to tell thewhyindicating heightened sensitivity. The subject has a need to explain why he was “real worried”.

  2. The subject earlier stated, “… I started to get real concerned …” and now without any other changes, states, “… so I started to get real worried …”. Again, one doesn’t “start” to get worried, one is or is not. The subject adds the qualifier “real”. The words “started” and “real”, which are repeated from a couple of lines previous, make the language a need to persuade where no persuasion is expected or needed. 

uh…her parents, her in laws, we’re actually living with them because we are building a house in Medina right now,  and we are living with her parents for a couple of months till our house is finished…uh…they were up at their lake home when I called them, they’d left that morning and they came back into town 

  1. “uh…her parents, her in laws, we’re actually living with them …” Why did he say “her in laws”?  They are his in laws, her parents. 

  2. “… we’re actually living with them because we are building a house in Medina right now,  and we are living with her parents for a couple of months till our house is finished…uh…” The subject adds “actually”, an unnecessary word bringing sensitivity to the living arrangement. This is then followed by the subject giving the reason why which is one of the highest forms of sensitivity. The subject then doubles down on the heightened sensitivity by repeating the reason why. Note, “living” is also repeated.  

  3. “…uh…they were up at their lake home when I called them, they’d left that morning and they came back into town …” This is unexpected language. If one doesn’t pay attention to the wording it may appear normal. Note how the element of time is important to the subject, “when”. The subject has a need to tell they weren’t home. Note, they left the morning of the day the victim disappeared. The word “left” when used a a connecting verb without the indication of rushing is one of the highest indicators of sensitivity. 

  4. “…uh…they were up at their lake home when I called them, they’d left that morning and they came back into town …” The additional and unnecessary words, “into town” show the subject is sensitive to his in-laws. The sensitivity around the “in-laws” should be considered important.  

and as I called, I called the police, they said just call hospitals, that’s all we can do at this point…so, as I called hospitals, they went down to Mall of America, drove around the parking lot, checked for the car, couldn’t find it anywhere. Um…we, uh…uh…oh, what am I trying to say?

  1. The subject is getting his sequence and narrative twisted in these lines. First, he is seeming to refer to the call he made to his in-laws, then abruptly goes to calling the police concurrent to being on the phone with his in-laws, “and as I called, I called the police …”. When this type of language is observed consider narrative building or storytelling or hidden agenda. Note, I believe he did call the in-laws and he did call the police.

  2. Note, “as I called” is presented in continuous present tense, elongating time. This is then repeated with “…so, as I called hospitals …” This could be the subject not wanting to get to the issue of “the car”?  Linguistical avoidance? 

  3. “… they said just call hospitals, that’s all we can do at this point…” The subject uses the pronoun “we” where the expected is the personal pronoun “I”. This is to crowd source and not be alone in the event. This is distancing language and unexpected. 

  4. “…so, as I called hospitals, they went down to Mall of America, drove around the parking lot, checked for the car, couldn’t find it anywhere. Um…we, uh…uh…oh, what am I trying to say?” The subject uses continuous present tense, “as I called …”, is this to avoid looking for or finding the car himself while looking like he is helping in the search?

  5. “… they went down to Mall of America, drove around the parking lot, checked for the car, couldn’t find it anywhere.” Why didn’t the subject do this while his in-laws drove back? Does he know he doesn’t need to? 

  6. “… checked for the car, couldn’t find it anywhere.” Note the use of the article “the car” and not “my car”. This is distancing language

  7. “… couldn’t find it anywhere.” The addition of the word “anywhere” is hyperbolic language to increase the efforts of the searchers. To not find it “anywhere” requires looking “everywhere”. This becomes a need to persuade doing a thorough search. Who needs to portray doing everything? One who isn’t. 

  8. “Um…we, uh…uh…oh, what am I trying to say?” the subject has a need to talk while giving the indication he needs to be careful what he says. The pauses and self-censoring indicate he can not speak freely. 


R: Her parents didn’t hear from her?

BD: No. No, she never called, never seen her since, and she just virtually disappeared. 

  1. “No” is a complete answer to the reporter’s question. The more words that follow indicate increasing sensitivity. The subject goes beyond answering and injects his own knowledge, “she never called …” How would he know she never called? The reporter didn’t ask if she called them. 

  2. After negating his wife calling, he goes to the visual, “never seen her since, and she just virtually disappeared.” Why does the subject add “virtually” to qualify “disappeared”

Then, yesterday, we were calling, your station, and I appreciate it…you know…the…the pieces that you ran on Ann and…you know, newspapers and the Star
Tribune everybody, you know…being real helpful getting information out there, and working with the police. 

  1. The subject then skips over time indicated by his use of “then”. He goes from the day she went missing to the next day, “yesterday”

  2. “Then, yesterday, we were calling, your station …” The subject again uses the pronoun “we” where the expected is “I”. Distancing/hiding in a crowd? 

  3. “Then, yesterday, we were calling, your station, and I appreciate it …” Note, the subject goes to the pronoun “I” in ingratiating language. 

  4. “… you know…the…the pieces that you ran on Ann and…you know, newspapers and the Star Tribune everybody, you know…being real helpful getting information out there, and working with the police.” The subject repeats “you know” three time in these few lines. It shows acute awareness of the audience. The subject is overtly ingratiating with his audience, the reporter.  

  5. “… everybody, you know…being real helpful getting information out there, and working with the police.” The subject refers to “helpful” as relating to “information and working with police”, it is not for searching or finding his wife. 


Calling people, trying to get people involved, people know about Ann, we put a flyer together, uh…with the help of Missing Children Association, they helped us put that together, 

  1. “Calling people, trying to get people involved, people know about Ann, we put a flyer together, …” The subject refers to “calling people” and “trying to get people involved”. This is unexpected language and distances the subject from the expected asking for people to search for his missing wife. Does he know there is no need to search? Note this is the first time in this interview her name is mentioned, note also that he does not say “my wife Ann”

and then this morning we were call, we were … called all our friends yesterday, and we’re having them all meet and hand out flyers, pass out flyers. And…

  1. The subject jumps over time, this is indicated by the use of “and then”. Consider that he is excluding pertinent information between his last words and those coming. Note, “and then” he goes to “this morning” but self-sensors and returns to “yesterday”. The subject gives no reason for the change. 

  2. “… and then this morning we were call, we were … called all our friends yesterday …” The subject stumbles on his words, repeating “we were call, we were” and then self-censors changing what was planned to something else. Again, this is an indication he needs to be careful what he says. 

  3. The subject remains linguistically in a group of people with the pronoun “we”. 

  4. “… called all our friends yesterday, and we’re having them all meet and hand out flyers, pass out flyers. And…” The subject is talking about “meeting” and “hand out flyers”, “pass out flyers”. As previously this can be possible distancing from “looking” or “searching” for his wife. The repeating of the word “flyers” is sensitive as is the change in language from hand out” to pass out”

R: Anything going on in her life that might make her want to drop out of sight, or…

BD: No. Just, just the opposite. Uh, everything in our life is like the best that’s ever been. She’s…uh…she just got promoted at work and things are just going fabulously for her, (…) Marketing manager there, uh…hum, she, we are building a brand-new home in Medina, it’s her dream home, we’re planning a family…uh…just everything that, that is, that you want out of in life is happening for us, so, it’s very unusual.


  1. “No. Just, just the opposite.” The word “no” is an appropriate and complete answer to the reporter’s question. Extra words lower the reliability of a yes or no answer in a need to persuade. Here the subject gives approximately 70 words. What follows is a need to explain why, one of the highest forms of sensitivity. 

  2. “No. Just, just the opposite.” The subject stutters, repeating the word “just” which indicates he is thinking about at least one other thing in context. The repetition elevates the other thought.  

  3. “Uh, everything in our life is like the best that’s ever been.” The subject uses the singular “life” but plural “our”. Is this leakage? Is there only one “life”

  4. Note, the subject does not say “everything is the best that’s ever been” by adding the words “is like” he allows the audience to conclude while not actually saying it himself. Is this to avoid an out right lie? 

  5. “She’s…uh…she just got promoted at work and things are just going fabulously for her, (…) Marketing manager there, uh…hum, she, we are building a brand-new home in Medina, it’s her dream home, we’re planning a family …” Here the subject presents three reasons why “everything is like”. Note, the stuttering on “she” and the addition of “just” twice. The subject is indicating sensitivity especially on the second “just”, “just going fabulously for her”. Is the subject resentful of her success? 

  6. “… she, we are building a brand-new home in Medina, it’s her dream home, …”. The subject changes what he was going to say or self-censored as noted by the pronoun change from “she” to “we”. Also note the “brand new home” is “her dream home” there is unity, “we” with “brand new home” but no unity with “her dream home”. This is a change in language. Changes in language are usually a result of emotion. 

  7. Unity returns in the next part with “we’re planning a family”.

R: How long have you been married?

BD: We’re married for a little over 8 years; we dated for 3 years though before that, you know…

  1. The element of time is emphasized and expanded more than the question asked making time sensitive, “a little over”, “8 years” 3 years before that”

R: How concerned does this make you to see the car here and,

BD: (looking at the car) Well, um…I, I’m happy, I’m happy that we found it because I’m hoping that it’ll give us some clues on where she might be…um, I don’t know what to think. I mean…it’s just uh…First it scares me, because… (sobbing) it’s here…hah…you know…I didn’t know if we’d find it, because I thought the police would find it yesterdayumm, then I talked to a guy at the FBI and he said that, generally they find the car after an all-points bulletin is put out in a few hours and he thought that maybe the car was out of town, she was out of the Twin Cities area, so…when we found it today I was really surprised. I mean after…

  1. (looking at the car) “Well, um…I, I’m happy, I’m happy that we found it …” The subject looks at the car which gives him time to process an answer, then he begins with a verbal pause and then another pause. This indicates a need to be careful where no need should exist if the subject’s intent is innocent.

  2. “… I, I’m happy, I’m happy that we found it …” The subject stutters on the personal pronoun “I” indicating that his stress is elevated then repeats “I’m happy …” making it sensitive. “happy” why “happy”? This is unexpected language, to find the car but not her is concerning. 

  3. “… because I’m hoping that it’ll give us some clues on where she might be…um, I don’t know what to think. I mean…it’s just uh …” The subject goes to give the reason why, possibly understanding “happy” is not the expected response. The subject’s need to explain continues for approximately 100 words with multiple reasons. 

  4. “… um, I don’t know what to think. I mean…it’s just uh …” The subject uses broken language, possibly due to self-censoring and or needing time to formulate an answer. The words, “I mean …” is an indication of a need to clarify something that was or could bemisinterpretedor spoken in error, similar to taking back something said. An innocent party would not be concerned with one’s own words as much as finding ones missing wife and this would be expected to be seen in the subject’s words. “I don’t know what to think …” is a way of inoculating himself for spoken errors and garner sympathy for himself.  

  5. First it scares me, because… (sobbing) it’s here…hah…you know…I didn’t know if we’d find it, because I thought the police would find it yesterdayumm, then I talked to a guy at the FBI and he said that, generally they find the car after an all-points bulletin is put out in a few hours and he thought that maybe the car was out of town, she was out of the Twin Cities area …” The subject uses the word “first”, “First it scares me, because…” When someone uses a numeric it indicates there is a logical thought process going on and that there is more than one thought regarding the context of the statement. If there is a “first” there must be at least a second or more.

  6. First it scares me, because… (sobbing) it’s here…hah…you know…I didn’t know if we’d find it, because I thought the police would find it yesterdayumm, then I talked to a guy at the FBI and he said that, generally they find the car after an all-points bulletin is put out in a few hours and he thought that maybe the car was out of town, she was out of the Twin Cities area …” The subject gives the reason why, high sensitivity, followed by a second reason why, doubling down on the first reason why. This makes not only finding the car sensitive but the time it took to find the car produces acute sensitivity to the subject. The second reason why,  “because I thought the police would find it yesterdayumm, then I talked to a guy at the FBI and he said that, generally they find the car after an all-points bulletin is put out in a few hours …” is unexpected and unnecessary to the question he is responding to, “How concerned does this make you to see the car here and, …?”, making it very sensitive and provides insight into the subject’s thinking. No one is questioning the police taking 2 days to find the car yet it is prominent in the mind of the subject. because I thought the police would find it yesterday …”  What reason did the subject have for the car not to be found “yesterday”? We don’t need to wait long, as he proceeds to give his reason why adding even more sensitivity. Note, there is no expectation for the police finding the car earlier unless the car was positioned for them to find. The subject then has a need to explain “why”, “…umm, then I talked to a guy at the FBI and he said that, generally they find the car after an all-points bulletin is put out in a few hours …”. The subject uses passive language “a guy at the FBI”. Passivity is used to conceal identity and or responsibility. 

  7. “…so…when we found it today, I was really surprised. I mean after…” The context of the car has brought points of the highest sensitivity out in the language of the subject. Unfortunately, the reporter interrupts as he may provide more information as he continued to try to explain away his, “Well, um…I, I’m happy …”.

R: (…)to realize the car is here?

BD: I just, thinking about it, thinking about her being gone is very hard for me. I mean (sobs)…you know…it’s tough (sobs) I’m sorry. It’s just, it’s…it’s a…you know, we just, you know, we just wanna find her and uh, you know, bring her home. You know, we just, we focus on the positives, you know, the good exposure we got from the media to help us, and hopefully getting these flyers out will get, we’ll find somebody that, that’s seen Ann and, and, you know, we’ll get a clue. And, uh…

  1. “I just, thinking about it, thinking about her being gone is very hard for me.” The subject begins with “I just …” then changes what he was about to say, self-censoring. “… thinking about it, thinking about it, thinking about her being gone What is “it”? Does he self-censor again? “… thinking about it, thinking about her being gone …” Why does he say “gone”, has he moved past her being “missing”? 

  2. “… is very hard for me.” The subject is concerned about himself and has not spoken to what his wife is going through nor has he shown empathy towards her. Does he know she is beyond concern?

  3. “I mean (sobs)…you know…it’s tough (sobs) I’m sorry. It’s just, it’s…it’s a…you know, we just, you know, we just wanna find her and uh, you know, bring her home. You know, we just, we focus on the positives, you know,” SIX “you know”, THREE “just”, pauses and broken language and ONE “I’m sorry”. This resembles a need to persuade something that should not require a need to persuade. The language indicates increasing stress for the subject, is this due to the questions about the car?

  4. “I’m sorry …” is always flagged as sensitive. It often indicates a guilt or remorse driven by the context. While guilt or remorse is not concluded by the words, “I’m sorry” it is a commonly seen in the language of guilty people.  

  5. “… we just wanna find her and uh, you know, bring her home. You know, we just, we focus on the positives, you know, the good exposure we got from the media to help us, and hopefully getting these flyers out will get, we’ll find somebody that, that’s seen Ann and, and, you know, we’ll get a clue. And, uh…” The subject again refers to “we” regarding his wife. Note, the subject says “hopefully” to find someone who has “seen Ann” and “we’ll get a clue”, this is unexpected and distancing from finding Ann. 

R: Anything about the car, anything in the car

BD: It, it looks, uh

R: I know we can’t touch it, let’s go…

BD: It looks…it looks uh…(walking towards the car). It looks totally normal to me…and…the detective, we kinda peered through the windows in there, you know, just like I said, there seem to be just a Hollywood Video bag and uh…a drugstore bag, and…there’s a bottle of water, being a runner and an athlete, she…she does that but…

  1. “it looks” is repeated four times with pauses and physically moving closer to the car. Repeated words and phrases are indications of sensitivity. On the last he completes the thought, “it looks totally normal to me …” The word “totally” qualifies “normal” and is unnecessary language as is “to me”. The word “normal” is often in the language of deceptive people as a need to persuade. 

  2. “… and…the detective, we kinda peered through the windows in there, you know, …”. The subject aligns with “the detective” with “we”, this is to not be alone in the statement. The subject then adds the qualifier, “kinda” which serves to minimize and distance himself from looking in the car. The word “peered” also minimizes and distances the subject from looking in the car. 

  3. “and…there’s a bottle of water, being a runner and an athlete, she…she does that but…The subject gives special attention to the “bottle of water”, by giving the reason “why” it is visible in the car. There is no need for the subject to give a reason “why” to the audience. It is very important to the subject. 

  4. “and…there’s a bottle of water, …” Again, the mentioning of “water” is flagged. The sensitivity to the bottle is elevated and unexpected.

R: It doesn’t seem damaged, and there’s been no accident

BD: No, it looks like normalit’s an older car…uh…but, you know…it…

  1. The subject repeats again “it looks” and also repeats “normal” making both sensitive to him.

  2. “… it’s an older car …”. Why does he say it’s an “older car”? This is followed by the word “but” a word which negates or minimizes what came before. It is unfortunate that the reporter interrupted the subject as he may have given us an understanding of why he had the need to say “it’s an older car”. Does having an “older car” bother the subject view in relation to one’s status?

R: Have the police told you anything that, that is going on…

BD: No, they just want to stay away from the car until they get a blood hound here, because um…they’re hoping that, uh, we brought some clothes that Ann had worn recently…and they’re hoping that a blood hound can maybe lead them a trail, and…give them a direction from here, um…and I guess if they get into the car that’ll (long pause) cause a problem.

  1. “No, they just want to stay away from the car until they get a blood hound here, because um…they’re hoping that, uh, we brought some clothes that Ann had worn recently…and they’re hoping that a blood hound can maybe lead them a trail, …” The subject adds the comparative word “just” indicating he is thinking of at least one other thing in context to the car. 

  2. “… until they get a blood hound here …” The word “blood” when used in context of a missing person is concerning. It would be of interest to know if he came to the word from his own internal dictionary or if the law enforcement used the term “blood hound” to the subject. 

  3. “because um…they’re hoping that, uh, we brought some clothes that Ann had worn recently…and they’re hoping that a blood hound can maybe lead them a trail, …” The subject provides the reason why, in this case the reason why is appropriate if explaining what law enforcement told him to the reporter. 

  4. “… uh, we brought some clothes that Ann had worn recently…” The subject uses the pronoun “we” which is unexpected. Expected is “I” or “they”, her parents bringing the clothes. Guilty parties often exchange the personal pronoun “I’ for “we” when wanting to hide in a group, it is often a means of avoiding responsibility. 

  5. “… and they’re hoping that a blood hound can maybe lead them a trail, …    and … give them a direction from here” NOTE, the subject uses “they’re” and “them”, does he not want them to lead them to Ann, his wife? The subject does not connect the trail to his missing wife. Linguistically he is not searching for her. “maybe lead them a trail, …    and … give them a direction from here” Note, “lead them” and “give them a direction from here”. Does he want them to move away from the car? He does not say “lead them to Ann”

  6. “a blood houndthis phrase is repeated. The article is expected to change to “the” from “a” after the initial introduction. 

R: ruin the scent

BD: Yeah, so…so we’re just…you know…

R: It’s a..

BD:  we’re kind of at an impasse see … and I don’t know what the…I’m happy we found the car because, it might be a source of clues. That’s, that’s all. Um…but…um…

  1. “… we’re kind of at an impasse see … and I don’t know what the…” What would make the subject call it “an impasse”? The word “impasse” denotes a difference of opinion resulting in a stalled progress. 

  2. “… and I don’t know what the…” The subject is using halting language and self-censoring which indicates an inability to speak freely.

  3. “… I’m happy we found the car because, it might be a source of clues. That’s, that’s all. Um…but…um…” The subject repeats “I’m happy …” This is unexpected and incongruent as mentioned earlier it is a concerning development and his wife is still missing with no positive information given.  

  4. “…I’m happy we found the car because, it might be a source of clues. That’s, that’s all. Um…but…um…” Again, the subject has a need to give a reason “why”,because, it might be a source of clues.elevating the sensitivity.

  5. “That’s, that’s all. Um…but…um…” The subject indicates he wants to shut off discussion with “that’s, that’s all”, this maybe in context to the car or other aspects of the discussion. It could be his own fear of saying too much or the wrong thing. This is supported by his pauses and self-censoring. Note, he says “Um…but…um…”, this is where the reporter should have let him carry on, by interrupting we lose information. The subject has the information and should be left to talk. 


R: This isn’t an area of the town she’d have come 

BD: No, um…she…the thing is, she, when she goes to discount department stores, she’d always shop at Target, she’s very Target loyal, she’d never go to Kmart just in general, and she’d never come to this part of town. Um, never alone, and never, never this part of town. She’s, she’s a very careful person in that respect, uh…you know, she carries a mace with her in her keychain, uh…she’s, very careful.

  1. “No, um…she…” Another yes or no question. “No”, is an appropriate answer. Words after the yes or no, diminish the reliability of the answer in a need to persuade. Here the subject gives reasons why elevating the sensitivity of the question to the subject.  

  2. “… she…the thing is, she, when she goes to discount department stores, she’d always shop at Target, she’s very Target loyal, she’d never go to Kmart just in general, and she’d never come to this part of town.” The subject goes on at length to explain “why” which wasn’t the question. He struggles to form a coherent thought. He struggles with the pronoun, “she”, referring to his missing wife, pausing and self-censoring. Note, “the thing is” is to focus the audience and is likely a manipulation, these are unnecessary words meant to provide a benchmark as if this is general knowledge and fact. 

  3. “… she’d never go to Kmart just in general, and she’d never come to this part of town. Um, never alone, and never, never this part of town.The subject tells the audience what she would “never” do. This is negation and an indicator of sensitivity. The audience expects to hear what she does or did not what she doesn’t or didn’t. The subject repeats “never” 5 times in two lines making this part of the statement very sensitive to himself. 

  4. In these 5 lines we have a series of sensitivity indicators, pausing, self-censoring, stumbling/repeating or stuttering on the pronoun “she”, giving the reasons why (blue highlight) to unasked questions and repeating the word “never”. WHY? What has caused this language? Why the sensitivity to the car sitting in a “Kmart” parking lot and his non-sensical reference to “Target”? THIS LOCATION IS VERY IMPORTANT TO THE SUBJECT. 

  5. “She’s, she’s a very careful person in that respect …” Note, the subject has for a second time referred to his wife as “a person”, this is distancing language. The subject is linguistically distancing himself from her. 

  6. “She’s, she’s a very careful person in that respect …” The addition of “in that respect” tell us that there are possibly other “respects” where she is not careful. Is this a backhanded compliment and a dismissive comment? Note the passivity of “in that respect”, what “respect” is not defined.

  7. She’s, she’s a very careful person in that respect, uh…you know, she carries a mace with her in her keychain, uh…she’s, very careful. The subject again gives the reason “why” making this very sensitive. The words “very careful” are also repeated adding to the sensitivity. Note, the wording is non-sensical. Consider this to be narrative building. “… she carries a mace with her …”, the mentioning of “mace” it to convince the audience that she was “careful” similar to mentioning “never” innever come to this part of town.”, is to intone the area was unsafe. Why would the subject need to make these points?


R: ( interrupting) Nothing of hers is in the car?

BD: No, there’s a pair of glasses that we saw in the car, um…and there’s uh…the keys are in the car, in the ignition, which is…I don’t know.

  1. Another yes or no question with an extended reply. 

  2. “there’s a pair of glasses that we saw in the car, um…” The subject said “no” to there being anything of hers in the car then mentions glasses but not whose they are, this is unexpected. Yet more unexpected is the repeated use of the pronoun “we” instead of “I”.

  3. “… and there’s uh…the keys are in the car, in the ignition, which is…I don’t know …” The “keys” would be hers? This is also unexpected since it should raise concerns about the safety of his wife as he has already given several reason that this is not normal, including that everything was normal,It looks…it looks uh…(walking towards the car). It looks totally normal to me…about the car earlier. The keys being “in the car, in the ignition”, in an area she “never” went to and is a person who, “She’s, she’s a very careful person in that respect …”, this in incongruent with his earlier language. NOW we see that the “keys in the ignition” does not produce the expected response or language in context to the situation, his wife is missing several days. This in context to the importance of the location of the car to the subject requires exploration. Did he position the car in the “Kmart” parking lot? 


R: I  don’t know either.

BD: I don’t know if that’s odd or not.

  1. Earlier the subject said his wife was “She’s, she’s a very careful person in that respect …” This is not in keeping with this earlier statement, keys left “in the ignition” is “odd” for a  “very careful person”

R: I don’t know either. Can we just leave it on you for a few minutes?

BD: sure 

R: How you interact with your friends and the police and you don’t want to interfere, but we sort of like to…

BD: It’s….no, it’s, just. It’s…you know, uh…things that give us hope are like that story about the little girl, you know, that, you know, after three months being gone, you know, she came back, and I’m sure she’s gonna have problems, you know, she has to go through, but, at least she’s home, you know, and that’s all we want, it’s to get Ann back in one piece and, uh, you know, and just ( sobbing) continue on, you know…so…

  1. “It’s….no, it’s, just. It’s…you know, uh…things that give us hope are like that story about the little girl, you know, that, you know, after three months being gone, you know, she came back, …” The subject struggles to make a coherent sentence. He pauses and self-censors and uses “you know” 8 times. He continues to distance himself from involvement in his wife and the search with the use of the plural pronoun “us” where “I” is expected. 

  2. “… and I’m sure she’s gonna have problems, you know, she has to go through, but, at least she’s home, you know, and that’s all we want, it’s to get Ann back in one piece and, uh, you know …” Again, the subject uses an unexpected plural pronoun, “all we want”.

  3. “… and I’m sure she’s gonna have problems, you know, she has to go through, but, at least she’s home, you know, and that’s all we want, it’s to get Ann back in one piece and, uh, you know …” Note, “that’s” and “back in one piece”, when viewed together why is there a qualifying, “that” and “in one piece” in his language. Expected is “I want Ann back”. The words, “that” and in one piece” is distancing from and not the same as “safe and sound”

  4. “… and, uh, you know, and just (sobbing) continue on, you know…so…” The subject adds the comparative word “just” to “just continue on”, this should be unnecessary but it means the subject is thinking of at least one other thing in context of “continue on”. The words, “continue on” is the language one would expect when speaking of someone who has died and the others, “continuing on” or “moving on”. 

  5. The argument that the subject is in distress for his missing wife does not sync with the qualified language and multiple sensitivity indicators. The pauses, self-censoring, qualified language, “you know” repeated eight times and unexpected use of the plural pronouns. 


R: You hang in there. They’re gonna find her.

BD: Thank you. (sobbing) It’s just uh…it’s hard. You know, it’s just hard.

  1. The subject repeats himself, “It’s just uh…it’s hard. You know, it’s just hard.” again, adding the comparative word “just” which should be unnecessary. Due to the subject having at least one other thought in context to “it’s hard” makes it enter his language. 

----

R: That’s OK

BD: These are pictures, uh…that’s actually after, uh…this is Twin Cities marathon, uh…that’s uh…after we finished the marathon, I believe that was the year before last, that’s Ann and me and her brother David at her parents’ home. And this is uh, Ann and me…in uh, Mexico, that’s where we are with Ann’s mother, and uh…that’s actually on my birthdayum…I just remember the band and the party we threw around on my birthday, so…

  1. The subject shows several small 4X6 pictures, none of which were suitable to assist the public in a search for his missing wife. Why did the subject not provide the poster he had commissioned for handing out? Why did the subject spend this opportunity to help search for his wife talking about himself?

R: It looks beautiful, it looks that you had a great time.

BD: Yeah, yeah it was, it was very very wonderful, so…

  1. This is incongruent language given the context of the subject’s missing wife’s car found abandoned with the keys “in the ignition”

R2: Can you show me the other two?

BD: Yeah.

R2: There she is.

BD: There she is, uh…that’s when she just finished, came across the finish line at (….) marathon…and uh…that is her at her parents’ home with her brother and me, so…

R: You’re a handsome couple.

BD: Well thank you
R: she’s lovely.

BD: well thank you very much.

R: Those are good pictures.

BD: Yeah. So…one thing that…uh…one of my friends said that uh…the security here at the parking lot, they came through and the car wasn’t here at 12.30 at night, so…um, that’s uh…I don’t know what that means, but, maybe that means that the trail will be fresh enough for the dogs and that, we’ll be able that, if they left here on foot, that we’ll be able to get a dog trail, and a friend of mine said that there might be a local business that they might have like a, a security camera or something, that might have picked up something too.


  1. The subject returns his attention to the parking lot? Why? 

  2. “Yeah. So…one thing that…uh…one of my friends said that uh…the security here at the parking lot …” The subject uses passivity “one of my friends” not “someone told me” or “the security” told me. This is distancing and possibly concealing language

  3. “… they came through and the car wasn’t here at 12.30 at night, …”. Note, the subject may be ejecting the pronoun, “they” for, “(  ) and the car wasn’t here at 12:30 at night”. It could be the security came through but the subject doesn’t say they said the car wasn’t there at 12:30. 

  4. “so…um, that’s uh…I don’t know what that means, …” The subject self-censors or changes what he planned to say as noted by the broken language and pauses. When he does form a sentence, it is similar to an earlier line, “I don’t know if that’s odd or not” regarding the keys being “in the ignition”, “…I don’t know what that means, …”. Is the subject intentionally planting thoughts in the mind of the audience? Is the subject manipulating the audience and feigning not knowing what it means? Given the sensitivity about the location it should be considered that the subject may have stagged the car in this location. The points he brings up could be a need to persuade that which doesn’t need persuasion, rather questions in his mind that he needs to pre-empt. Had the subject not added, “…I don’t know what that means, …”, then the question of his knowing would not be in question.

  5. “… but, maybe that means that the trail will be fresh enough for the dogs and that, we’ll be able that …”. The subject then says “but” which refutes or minimizes by comparison what came before, “…I don’t know what that means, …”.

  6. “… if they left here on foot, that we’ll be able to get a dog trail …” The word “trail” is repeated making it sensitive to the subject. Note, the subject goes to “if they …” which is unexpected, it is to presupposes that there is more than one person and does not tie them to his wife. 

  7. “… if they left here on foot, that we’ll be able to get a dog trail …” The subject uses the word “left” which when used as a connecting verb and rushing or haste is not the motivation for the use of the word indicates one of the highest indicators of sensitivity. Note, that the subject includes the unnecessary word “here” adding to the sensitivity of “left” and bringing the car and its location close and sensitive to the subject.  

  8. “… and a friend of mine said that there might be a local business that they might have like a, a security camera or something, that might have picked up something too.” The passive “friend” returns to add information. Is this a way for the subject to manipulate the audience and distance himself from the person producing the information? Has the subject stagged the car in the parking lot?



R: Well, it gives us a timeline …

BD: right

  1. The subject gives a reliable response. Short and no qualifiers. Since the location of the car produced a large amount of sensitivity was this a planned manipulation of the audience to build and portray a narrative? 

R: that’s important.


CONCLUSIONS:

Deception indicated. 

The subject does not show empathy or concern to what his missing wife might be going through while standing in front of just located car.

The subject does not appear to be motived in finding his wife and he linguistically lacks commitment to finding her. 

The subject uses the plural pronouns, “we” and “us” where the personal pronoun “I” is the expected pronoun. This is distancing and linguistically hiding in a group.

When offered the camera to make a plea or show pictures he does not utilize the opportunity and shows pictures that one can not make his wife out and speaks as much of himself in the pictures, which is unexpected.  He does not present a flyer which he said he had made up for him and his friends to post and that he referenced during the interview. 

The subject uses passivity and doesn’t provide times when he was at locations he mentioned.

The subject uses passivity in “a friend of mine” telling him things. This may be himself and using “a friend” in a manner or manipulating the audience presenting information he wants in the public domain while not being the source of the information. 

The subject gives numerous indicators of heightened sensitivity telling the audience “why” things occurred when the expected is to tell “what” occurred. This is often deployed by deceptive people to manipulate the thoughts of the audience by providing answers to what are often unasked question. Questions that might be in the mind of the subject only. 

Some of the highest sensitivity centers around the car and specifically the location of the car. The sensitivity is not linguistically connected to finding the missing wife, rather centered on the location.

There are several references to “water” and to “bathroom” which are often seen in guilty parties in a need to cleanse. 

In the video it appears he is trying to suppress laughter and his sobbing seems contrived.

The subject makes references to things which are directly relatable to money/monetary concerns. Money, wealth and status are indicated in the subject’s linguistic reality, in his language. 

  1. Living with her parents.

  2. Building a new home / house, mentioned twice and once referenced as “her dream home”

  3. Discount stores. 

  4. Nordstrom, a luxury department store chan.  “where she buys all of her shoes”

  5. Mentions vacation in Mexico with her mother on his birthday. Did his mother-in-law pay for the vacation? 

  6. He refers to his wife’s car as “it’s an older car”.

  7. The in-laws had a “lake house”

  8. “she just got promoted”


please now see; 


https://www.documentcloud.org/documents/6774219-4-Dunlap-McCrary-Analysis-for-Chubb.html