Wednesday, January 7, 2015

Carolina Adkins, 26, Missing



On New Year's Eve, 26 year old Carolina Adkins left her house (approximately 1am New Years Day) and has not been seen since.  

In the news articles about the case, we have various quotes from her husband, but none of the articles are written with consistency; that is, letting us know if he is making open statements, or if he is answering questions directly.  

Please note that there is not enough information  to draw a conclusion.  

Carolina Adkins, 26, was last seen at the Mariner's Pointe Apartments where she lived with her husband and two small children. 

Here is what one article wrote:

"Her distraught husband, Joseph Shepherd, recounted one of their final interactions.
"She gave me a hug and a kiss and told me it was a new year," he said. "I said 'yeah baby, it's a new year.'"

We do not know if the subject was asked to recount their final interaction, as worded above.  
If not:  this becomes important. "Hug" and "kiss" would then appear to be an attempt to portray the relationship in a positive manner. 
If it is a response to a question, the above analysis does not apply.  
Next:  we note the word "told", rather than "said", which is authoritative and more indicative of a verbal argument than a loving statement.  Did they argue before she left?
"Baby" could be a term of endearment, used to impress the listener that this is a good relationship when it is actually an argument, or a troubled one.  The context is not clear.  If he was answering the direct question and quoting himself, it is appropriate.  
This is something interesting:  
"It's a new year" could be the same as a new beginning.  We often feel a need for a new beginning when we have problems and want to change things.  Was this a signal of trying to reconcile something between them?  Or, was it about the daily stresses of child raising and surviving, including the fact that they have a special needs child?
Shepherd said at around 1 a.m. New Year's Day, Adkins put on a beige hooded jacket.
"I said, 'Where are you going,'" he said. "She said, "I'm going to the living room and its been cold in there,"
"cold" is an interesting word.  It could be about the living room and it could refer to the relationship.  

In context, we do not know where they were.  Let's consider that they may have been in the bedroom.  She is leaving the bedroom to go into the living room at 1am? The quests that were in the home earlier have left and she is physically separating herself from her husband.  This should be explored.  
Shepherd said he went to sleep. The next morning, he woke up and his wife was gone. He said their front door was unlocked and her keys, purse and cell phone were still in the apartment.
"I woke up and saw my kids sitting next to me. I didn't see my wife," Shepherd cried.
This is oddly worded.  The body posture of the kids indicates an increase of tension.  "I didn't see my wife" is not to say that she left or she was gone. 
In this short, choppy article, we did not hear her name used.  "My wife", although incomplete, still takes ownership of her (possessive pronoun) and she still has the title, "wife."  Compare this with Chief McCollum's utter avoidance of the two elements.  
"I just find it hard to believe she strayed too far away without her car, her keys and her purse," said Myron McCarthur, Adkins older brother.  

This brother spoke on television and was articulate, honest and showed appropriate concern for his sister. 
Adkins mother, siblings, nieces and nephews recently filled her living room. At times they fought back tears as they shared sadness and anger over her disappearance.
They said she was known to be responsible, earning her the nickname "Mother Carol," and that she would never leave her husband and two children behind, especially since her 6-year-old daughter Autumn suffers from a serious heart condition.

Please note this paragraph about "Mother Carol" never leaving her children behind, with the statement about her leaving for a few days.  

“I’ve known her since I was in the seventh grade. She never does this and if she was to be gone for a day or two, she’ll have her phone with her.” her husband said.  

Another article said he stopped her from having another drink, which may explain the argumentative language of "told" rather than "said."
Next, her mother spoke:  
"We just want her home," said Myra Adkins. "She has a beautiful family. We want her home and I can't understand it," she said.
This may indicate that her mother does not know of something wrong in the marriage, or any problems with work, or other relationships. 

Here, another quote from the husband:  
"I just want my wife back," Shepherd said, "That is the missing piece to my puzzle. That is my heart. She is my baby and if anybody got her, just bring her back to me please."
It would be important to learn what he means by "puzzle" ; it may be a simple poetic look at life.

"That" is distance.  It is repeated.  There is distancing language, not towards her, but towards his puzzle and his heart.  This may indicate an argument before she left, and highlight the need for a "new" year.  
He allows for the possibility of kidnapping with "if" as it is helpful to learn the opinions of those closest to her.  Do they think she ran off?  Or, do they believe that she was kidnapped?
Sometimes a guilty person will try to convince his audience that she was kidnapped.  This is not the case here.  He only allows for it with "if"...He is not attempting to make it sound like a kidnapping.  
"I'm having nightmares about people taking my wife. I wake up and look at the sun and I see it's another day," Shepherd sobbed.
I like to hear concern for the missing person more than those left behind.  It is understandable that the family suffers, but it is expected that a husband who is no longer able to love, protect and help her, will express concern for her well being.  
Married for three years, Shepherd and Adkins have a love story that began in the seventh grade.
"I loved her since I was in middle school," he said. "She is beautiful, gorgeous, the most beautiful thing in the planet to me."
The past tense "loved" is appropriate since he is going back to middle school in his sentence.  This is not a red flag.  

From other articles : 
"We didn’t argue at all. Everything was bliss. It was very peaceful. And that’s why it’s so weird,"
We do not know if this was in an open statement, making it concerning, or if the journalist asked, "Were you arguing?" but I do not like the word "bliss" or "very peaceful."
No marriage is "bliss" because no life is bliss.  Not only do they have the struggles that all human relationships have, but they have a special needs child and a mother who is sick.  

Recall Scott Peterson's description of his marriage to Lacy:
"glorious."

"That's why it's so weird":  why would her happiness and bliss have something to do with a kidnapping?  Or is this in relation to her taking off on her own accord?  He made a plea for people to return her.  It is difficult to know if this was in response to a question, or just him speaking freely.  This is why journalist must have Statement Analysis training. 

“I’ve been sitting on the couch waiting and waiting, looking through the window, waiting for her to come home and she has not come back. I’m just really worried about her,” 

Here he gives his body posture, another signal of tension.  He does not say he has been out searching for her, but this may be due to the children's needs, where he has to watch them.  We do not know.

I like to see pro-active statements about organizing searches, posters, alerting others, etc.  It may be that these activities are covered by the family and not the husband.
I do like that he is really worried "about her" in this sentence.  When someone shows only concern for himself, and not for the victim, it is alarming.  

There is not enough here to draw a conclusion.  Readers know that I do not 'hedge' my bets in analysis.  
The husband has not cleared himself and it is important to ask him questions about his language.  
There is not enough here to make a conclusion.  The writing of the articles did not help the flow of information.  
Inconclusive.  

23 comments:

john said...

Stockton Husband Pleads For Woman’s Safe Return After ‘Suspicious’ Disappearance

STOCKTON (CBS13) — A Stockton husband is making a desperate plea for his missing wife and the mother of his children to come home as police investigate her suspicious disappearance.
There was no warning or hint of trouble when Carolina Adkins left in the middle of the night on Thursday after celebrating the new year.
“She told me she was going to the living room. I didn’t pay no attention to it, so I went back to sleep,” said Joe Shepard.
When he woke up, his wife of three years and someone he’s known since the seventh grade was gone.
At 1 a.m., just one hour after celebrating the new year with her family, Adkins told her brother Marcellus that she was going for a quick walk. She gave him a hug and said she’d be back.
“She didn’t come home, and I’ve been waiting for the longest but she hasn’t been back,” Marcellus Adkins said.
Stockton Police say it’s puzzling that Carolina Adkins disappeared after leaving her cellphone, keys and wallet at the family apartment. They don’t know where she was walking in the middle of the night.
Officer Joe Silva says the 26-year-old has never done anything like this before, and says her disappearance is suspicious.
“If anyone has information please do the right thing and call us,” he said.
Carolina’s family insists she would never just up and leave without calling or checking in for days, because too many people depend on her.
“That’s why they call her Mother Carol, because she runs everything she takes care of everybody,” Marcellus Adkins said. “It’s hard to be without my sister”
Carolina’s husband pleads that if someone has her to bring his wife back safe and sound.
“If she blindfolded or anything, just drop her off and then call us with a private number and tell us where she at, so she can come home,” Joe Shepard said.

http://sacramento.cbslocal.com/2015/01/05/stockton-husband-pleads-for-womans-safe-return-after-suspicious-disappearance/

john said...

Update:

Gun expert calls Glock 17 accidental discharge 'impossible'


It is one of the most reliable handguns you can shoot. The Glock 17 is the same type of gun Peachtree City Police Chief William McCollom fired the night he shot his wife, Margaret.

McCollom told a 911 operator it was an accident.

"(The) gun was in the bed. I went to move it. I put it to the side and it went off," McCollom said during the call.

Christopher Robinson, a court certified expert witness on firearms, said with that type of gun, there are no accidental discharges.

Robinson said he has fired more than 10,000 Glocks, he has never seen one discharge accidentally.

"It's one it the safest guns in the world... It's impossible to fire the gun without pulling the trigger," Robinson said. "A gun can't just go off by you moving it, especially not the Glock 17."

Robinson, a former firearms examiner with the GBI and a former director of the Atlanta Police crime lab, demonstrated at the Atlanta Range and Ordnance gun shop how tough it is to unintentionally fire the gun.

The Glock 17 has three safeties, including a separate lever built into the trigger. It is unlikely a shooter could pull the trigger without depressing the safety lever.

"I have to squeeze the trigger with enough force to fire the weapon," Robinson said, adding that it takes at least five pounds of force to pull the trigger after depressing the safety.

To generate that type of force, Robinson said a shooter would have to intend to pull the trigger.

"He had to pull the trigger in some way, shape or form to fire the weapon," Robinson said.

http://www.cbs46.com/story/27777638/gun-expert-calls-glock-17-accidental-discharge-impossible#ixzz3O9WmURiW

Anonymous said...

I believe him, enough to say I do not think he is "guilty". I wonder if she ran off with somebody intentionally. If she put on her coat - it's enough to make me think she meant to go outside. but not taking her cell of purse - it's enough to make me think she meant to make herself untraceable and her disappearance a mystery.

the moments after new year can carry a lot of significance, IF somebody is thinking if leaving their husband/family/ etc --- it's believable that they would wait until after new years --- give them the holidays -- and then go.

I suspect some part of him realizes she may have left him intentionally and this is why some parts of his language are slightly off. and in truth he doesn't know. and neither do I.

Anonymous said...

Maybe she was a smoker, and went outside to have a cigarette?

trustmeigetit said...

Thanks for sharing that about guns John. I was curious as I know nothing about guns.

Add in the fact that he's trained on gun use and safety... How would an accident then happen?

That convinces me that was on purpose, not that I was not already there with Peters analysis.

What amazes me is that as a cop, you would think he would know this would be information others would know. That he would look bad. And if she was asleep, this is more planned and wasn't in the heat of the moment. Not a smart man!

The simple fact he has been allowed to see her concerns me. What if she was unconscious, would they allow him to be alone with her?

I hope they are protecting her! She is in danger and I really think next time she may just be reported missing and possibly never found.

Especially at this age. They can just divorce and move on. No kids to have to support. I don't like this at all and concerned he may be protected by his fellow officers if he worked for the same station that came to the scene.. Which since he called one by name directly when they walked in (while on the phone with 911) I think he does know them.

trustmeigetit said...

I had another thought...

I have not seen anything more about why the gun was in the bed. I mean why, that is very dangerous.

My questions to wifey would be

"Did u take the gun to bed with you"

Or

"Did u know the gun was in your bed"

I can't imagine just laying down in bed next to a loaded gun.

My Sew Imperfect Life said...

OT: http://m.cnn.com/crime/2014/06/29/cops-mom-also-used-web-on-car-heat-deaths

Leanna Harris also researched car deaths. Your instincts were right Peter. Love,
A daily reader/lurker
Ps my 16 yr old HATES statement analysis ;-)

GetThem said...

I'll look forward to reading the rest of his statement.

GetThem said...

I just read your post John. From that article, it sounds like the brother may have knowledge too. Who lets their sister go for a walk at 1AM? And hugged him first too? I don't give people a hug before a walk, does anyone?

"...blindfolded." ---- Hmmm. Who is this "us" he references. The bro?

We need more info.

Peter Hyatt said...

Thank you Sew.

I don't blame your 16 year old.

I found Leanna Harris to be deceptive. She should have been charged, but was not.

Peter

trustmeigetit said...

I agree Leanna Harris should be charged. No normal person researches that.

I can see if she searched ways to make sure it didn't happen, but the way they did it looks like planning and I don't get how they both were not charged.

Peter Hyatt said...

I always question the passing of a polygraph unless the questions asked are released.

The reason:

Guilty people can pass them if their subject's own language is not used.

This is why the pre-screening interview must be from the training of statement analysis. The interviewer learns what language the subject uses first, and then tells the subject, "Here are your words. Here are the questions I am going to ask you" and then hook them up to the machine and ask them.

No surprises.

No new language.

No introduced language.

Q. Did you research how long a child would survive in a hot vehicle?

Find out by asking questions, what language Leanna Harris uses, and then ask.

A pedophile passed a polygraph when asked, "Did you molest her?"

He did not believe what he did was molestation. It was, in his personal, subjective, internal dictionary,
"tickling."

Had he been asked, "Did you tickle her?"
he would have failed.

Peter

Peter Hyatt said...

I always question the passing of a polygraph unless the questions asked are released.

The reason:

Guilty people can pass them if their subject's own language is not used.

This is why the pre-screening interview must be from the training of statement analysis. The interviewer learns what language the subject uses first, and then tells the subject, "Here are your words. Here are the questions I am going to ask you" and then hook them up to the machine and ask them.

No surprises.

No new language.

No introduced language.

Q. Did you research how long a child would survive in a hot vehicle?

Find out by asking questions, what language Leanna Harris uses, and then ask.

A pedophile passed a polygraph when asked, "Did you molest her?"

He did not believe what he did was molestation. It was, in his personal, subjective, internal dictionary,
"tickling."

Had he been asked, "Did you tickle her?"
he would have failed.

Peter

Buckley said...

I don't give people a hug before a walk, does anyone?

New Years Eve? My spouse heading to bed for the night? I've been drinking? Yes, I'd have given a hug.

Lemon said...

PH said: "...personal, subjective, internal dictionary,..."
This reminds me of Bill Clinton :)

Buckley said...

Ok found her facebook page under Carolina Shepherd. Why reported missing as Adkins? Two interesting things: under relationships: "It's complicated." Also, coincidentally, only read through December but last month she posted 2 missing person "shares."

tania cadogan said...

a hug is often used at goodbyes, why would she put on a coat if the lounge was chilly?

Why did he not question where she was going?
I would ask why do you need a coat, why not a sweater or cardigan?

A quick walk where?

If she told her huuby she was going to the living room and he went back to sleep, where was he?

At 1am she allegedly told her brother she was going for a quick walk, what happened after that time?

Who else was in the house at the time and where?

how much alcohols was drunk that hubby was sleeping>

She told him (strong) she was going to the living room and he WENT BACK TO SLEEP. indicating he had previously been asleep/

Were drugs involved?

Buckley said...

It seems clear she lied to hubby about where she was going with coat but told brother. Why? He didn't want her to drink more so if she was going for a drink, it makes sense she'd lie about where she was going and and why she needed a coat.

Anonymous said...

Obama: “The Future Must Not Belong to Those Who Would Slander the Prophet of Islam”

Anonymous said...

"There is no slander that provides an excuse for people to burn a restaurant in Lebanon, or destroy a school in Tunis, or cause death and destruction in Pakistan...The future must not belong to those who slander the prophet of Islam. Yet to be credible, those who condemn that slander must also condemn the hate we see when the image of Jesus Christ is desecrated, churches are destroyed, or the Holocaust is denied. Let us condemn incitement against Sufi Muslims, and Shiite pilgrims.

Lemon said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Linda said...

It sounds like he cut her off drinking and she wanted more. She told him she was putting on her coat to go into the living room but was actually going out to a bar or friend's house to drink more. I'm guessing she was probably intoxicated when she left and I bet it's going to turn out to be a situation where she died to due to an accident while drunk, falling, passing out in a bad place, etc.

GetThem said...

Knowing what we know now, that makes sense to me Linda. Wanting to continue the party. I think she may have told her brother tho and he covered for her.