Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Law Enforcement's Deceptive Statement of the Day


When I receive a great quote from law enforcement, I will post it as the "Deceptive Statement of the Day."

LEO:  please submit your favorite Deceptive Statement of the Day via www.hyattanalysis.com "contact."

This one comes from the Southeast US via a well experienced investigator and analyst:  




“I can say I know for like a fact that he ain’t go nowhere and do nothing.”


9 comments:

Peter Hyatt said...

Great article on the means of deception:

http://canadafreepress.com/article/trump-vs.-obama1

Peter

Anonymous said...

The subject lost me at "know for like a fact"

-KC

happyuk said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Ode said...

“I can say I know for like a fact that he ain’t go nowhere and do nothing.”

STUDENT:
Who me?

TEACHER:
Yes. Read your essay, please!

STUDENT:
Uh, I don`t have it finished yet.

TEACHER:
Well then, read what you have, young man!

STUDENT:
Okay. The first day on my vacation, what I did on my summer vacation, the first day on my vacation, I woke up. Then, I went downtown to look for job. Then I hung out in front of the drugstore. The second day on my summer vacation, I woke up, then I went downtown to look for a job. Then I hung out in front of the drugstore. The third day on my summer vacation, I woke up...


ah, I plead the 5th

you don't say said...

Orwellian Colleges Socially Engineering Students with Fake Pronouns

' how to use pronouns * which pronouns do you identify with ?' College edumacation

https://youtu.be/T79dSYrjMQ0

Foolsfeedonfolly said...


“I can say I know for like a fact that he ain’t go nowhere and do nothing.”- 17 words, 6 qualifiers before the subject gets to the "denial".

"I can say..."- So what can't this subject say? If there's a "can", there's a "can't" and the "can't" has a reason. So far he's truthful, he does have the ability to speak.

"I can say I know..."- Why does the subject feel the need to bolster his statement before he even makes it?

"I can say I know like...- Like is a comparative term and he wants us to believe him because he "can" say this and because he knows (self-referencing). How truthful is this subject normally?

"I can say I know for like a fact..."- He cannot say that whatever follows is a fact or even that he know it. It's interesting that he chooses the word fact and that he "knows it like a fact". Short, sweet, and truthful would be "I know he didn't _______" or "He didn't _________". (With the investigator follow-up question being, "How do you know?")

"I can say I know for like a fact that he ain't go nowhere and do nothing."- Both "nowhere" and "nothing" are not situation and accusation specific. Everyone goes places and everyone does things. According to this subject, the other person ["he"] does neither. Unbelievable.

It kind of fascinates me that this subject uses both "ain't" and "do". Depending on education level and region, I would expect "he ain't gone nowhere" and/or done nothing"or even just "he ain't done nothing". I was surprised by the present tense verbs "do" and "go", as well.

Trigger said...

This is a very awkward statement.

"like a fact" He is not saying that it "is a fact", so we cannot say it for him.

"He ain't go no where and do nothing" say what? No past tense verbs or specific accusation.

Deception indicated

New England Water Blog said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
New England Water Blog said...

New England Water Blog said...
It brings to mind the Jim Kweskin version of Stagger Lee:

"Stagger Lee said to the Sheriff, these are the very words he said
The man I ran away from ain't been born and his mammies' dead..